Tea (rec.drink.tea) Discussion relating to tea, the world's second most consumed beverage (after water), made by infusing or boiling the leaves of the tea plant (C. sinensis or close relatives) in water.

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Old 02-02-2004, 06:10 PM
Ole Kvaal
 
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Default tea and sandwiches?

Hi.
Any suggestions what sort of tea I could drink along with a couple of
sandwiches in my lunch break? Until now, I've been drinking orange juice to
my lunch, but I'd much rather find a tea that would go nicely with - and
after - my meal.
Thanks in advance

--

regards,
ole k,
trondheim



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Old 02-02-2004, 06:27 PM
Michael Plant
 
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Default tea and sandwiches?

Ole /2/04

Hi.
Any suggestions what sort of tea I could drink along with a couple of
sandwiches in my lunch break? Until now, I've been drinking orange juice to
my lunch, but I'd much rather find a tea that would go nicely with - and
after - my meal.
Thanks in advance


A green tea or a white tea would undoubtedly be overwhelmed by your
sandwich. The fruit and flower of most oolongs (and most likely Darjeelings
too) would clash and compete. A black tea would do nicely. Since most
"common" teabag teas are some combination of Assam and/or Ceylon tea, why
not try a Keemun, a Yunnan, or another Chinese black tea? That's my
suggestion....

.....which reminds me of my Trondhjem story....

I left my rucksack, tent, and sleeping bag tied to the back of the motor
scooter (friend's motor scooter) parked on the street, and when we returned
to it three days later the stuff was safe and sound and untouched, as
expected. Try to do that in the middle of New York City, and see what
happens.

Michael

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Old 02-02-2004, 06:30 PM
Ole Kvaal
 
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Default tea and sandwiches?

Michael Plant wrote:
....which reminds me of my Trondhjem story....

!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! !!!!!!!!!??!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

--

mvh,
ole k,
trondheim


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Old 02-02-2004, 06:33 PM
Ole Kvaal
 
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Default tea and sandwiches?

Ole Kvaal wrote:
Michael Plant wrote:
....which reminds me of my Trondhjem story....


!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! !!!!!!!!!??!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


Sorry, I was too surprised to remember to say thanks for your reply :-)
I didn't even imagine someone abroad (I suppose) would know the name
Trondhjem for Trondheim. . . . . .

--

regards,
ole k,
trondheim


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Old 02-02-2004, 06:45 PM
Michael Plant
 
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Default tea and sandwiches?

Ole /2/04

Ole Kvaal wrote:
Michael Plant wrote:
....which reminds me of my Trondhjem story....


!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! !!!!!!!!!??!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


Sorry, I was too surprised to remember to say thanks for your reply :-)
I didn't even imagine someone abroad (I suppose) would know the name
Trondhjem for Trondheim. . . . . .



Wow. Thanks for your second response. I actually thought you were mad with
me. I wonder if my story could be told today. (It was from the 1960's.) BTW,
I'm drinking Bamboo Fragrance Green Pu-erh. (Some might say, "uncooked
pu-erh.") Very very nice. From Silk Road Tea. There, that's for relevance.

Michael



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Old 02-02-2004, 07:05 PM
Ole Kvaal
 
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Default tea and sandwiches?

Michael Plant wrote:

Wow. Thanks for your second response. I actually thought you were mad
with me. I wonder if my story could be told today. (It was from the
1960's.)


I very much doubt so. The railway station area is probably one of the least
thinkable places to leave your stuff. I mean, now you even have to watch
your pockets (now THAT'S a bit more like New York City, I suppose). Glad to
hear you've got those happy memories, though.


BTW, I'm drinking Bamboo Fragrance Green Pu-erh. (Some might
say, "uncooked pu-erh.") Very very nice. From Silk Road Tea. There,
that's for relevance.

Did Pu-erh just once, and it was - eh - very special. Don't expect much
from the local teastore anyway. Later this month I'll start online shopping,
so perhaps I'll find something out there.

--

regards,
ole k,
trondheim


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Old 03-02-2004, 04:55 AM
Leif Thorvaldson
 
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Default tea and sandwiches?


"Ole Kvaal" wrote in message
...
Ole Kvaal wrote:
Michael Plant wrote:
....which reminds me of my Trondhjem story....



!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! !!!!!!!!!??!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


Sorry, I was too surprised to remember to say thanks for your reply :-)
I didn't even imagine someone abroad (I suppose) would know the name
Trondhjem for Trondheim. . . . . .

--

regards,
ole k,
trondheim


From Michael's story about the "unstolen" gear on the motorbike and his use
of "Trondhjem," it was apparent to me that Michael's experience was quite
some time in the past. Crime has come to Norway with a vengeance principally
from all the immigrants that have been allowed in the country. The
Norwegians are never satisfied with their language and have had about five
shifts in "approved" spellings and grammar. Ny Norsk (New Norwegian) is an
attempt to resurrect the earlier Norwegian language prior to the Danish and
Swedish influences. School children are expected to be accomplished in
both. Sort of like learning Spanglish or Ebonics along with a test in
English.Reminds me a bit about the French and their efforts to retain
linguistic purity!

mhv,

Leif Thorvaldson
Eatonville, Washington, USA


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Old 03-02-2004, 09:13 AM
Dieter Folz
 
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Default tea and sandwiches?

"Ole Kvaal" wrote in message ...
Hi.
Any suggestions what sort of tea I could drink along with a couple of
sandwiches in my lunch break? Until now, I've been drinking orange juice to
my lunch, but I'd much rather find a tea that would go nicely with - and
after - my meal.
Thanks in advance


Hi,

With sandwiches you should drink a tea, which taste and flavour isn't
to fragile. So, every high qualitiy tea would be too good for it. In
the contrast, all every day quality but tasty tea (black or green) you
like will go well with sandwiches, although the tea has some edges,
which will be a nice thing, going with a meal. You have to find out
for yourself. If your sandwiches are a bit stronger (maybe a hearty
bred with a dark crust and / or with a good cheese or a nice (Italian)
salami) try to make the tea a dash stronger too ;-). BTW, after lunch
I would prefer an Earl Grey. In the early afternoon you can enjoy a
cup of a high quality tea of your choice, just to relax and to explore
the taste, but with a meal, a standard quality with some edges is IMHO
the best.


Dieter
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Old 03-02-2004, 10:26 AM
Ripon
 
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Default tea and sandwiches?

"Ole Kvaal" wrote in message news:uwvTb.1171$rj4.16915 Any suggestions what sort of tea I could drink along with a couple of
sandwiches in my lunch break? Until now, I've been drinking orange juice to
my lunch, but I'd much rather find a tea that would go nicely with - and
after - my meal.

Thanks in advance

Hello Ole:

It's all depending on, what is inside your sandwiches. I think black
tea is always best. My suggestions a-

Chicken or turkey sandwiches- Lapsang Souchong or any sweet, smokey
keemun, Russian Caravan blend
Egg Sandwiches- Darjeeling, Keemun Mao Feng, Golden monkey or red
peony
Beef or Pork sandwiches-Yunnan, any afternoon blend( Assam, Kenya,
Ceylon or Bangladeshi blend)
Vegetable Sandwiches-Gunpowder green or Darjeeling silver tips
Sea food sandwiches- any good Oolong or peppery Keemun
Custard sandwiches- a strong malty assam or Bangladeshi orthodox tea
or Keemun Hao Ya A or B not delicate Keemun Mao Feng

Without milk and sugar. That's my way to enjoy my sandwiches with tea.

Ripon
(Dhaka, Bangladesh)
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Old 03-02-2004, 10:35 AM
cc
 
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Default tea and sandwiches?

Hi Ole,

Any suggestions what sort of tea I could drink along with a couple of
sandwiches in my lunch break?


Depends on your tastes and habits...

A personnal choice :
Ti Kuan Ying Oolong teas (average quality, light brew, hot or cold) goes
well with about all sort of food. Except maybe smelly cheese, but I don't
think any tea would.
For the rest, that depends what you put in your sandwiches, and of course
your tastes. In general, if it's rich (fat), Jasmine tea and Puer tea,
during or after, they favor digestion, but I don't think that's so pleasant
with a cold meal. If it's lighter, and contains few dairy or meat, simple
green teas are a good match.
Black teas, fruit flavored teas, etc, especially if you add something
(sugar, milk, lemon, spices...) go better with sweet stuff, or after the
meal as a dessert.

Don't forget to drink at least as much water as tea, or you can feel tired
when you're
deshydrated (bread is dry + cafeinated drinks accelerate deshydratation). To
avoid that, I often pack water or cafeineless cold cereal decoctions
(barley, buckwheat or corn) to drink during the meal, for hydratation and as
nutty taste goes well with sandwiches. Later, back at work, I have a cup of
hot green or fragrant oolong.

Kuri



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Old 03-02-2004, 12:10 PM
Michael Plant
 
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Default Eventually, It's All Pu-Erh (was: tea and sandwiches?)

Ole /2/04

BTW, I'm drinking Bamboo Fragrance Green Pu-erh. (Some might
say, "uncooked pu-erh.") Very very nice. From Silk Road Tea. There,
that's for relevance.

Did Pu-erh just once, and it was - eh - very special. Don't expect much
from the local teastore anyway. Later this month I'll start online shopping,
so perhaps I'll find something out there.


Yes, I think in the case of Pu-erh you especially want to get quality. I
recommend -- not that you asked me -- starting with a vendor you can talk
with -- by e-mail at least -- and discuss the specific qualities of the
teas. This afternoon I drank a thirty year old "cooked" pu-erh, which was a
wonderful tea. One of its special qualities was that in the first few
"steeps" it was earthy and bold. Around the fourth steep it started to
become sweeter and sweeter without losing the earthiness; more balance and
style came in later, in other words. BTW, this is a tea from a local
merchant who doesn't sell beyond her little shop and tea drinking place.
Pu-erhs of this quality are available from many places. Mike Petro, Livio,
and others can guide you to European vendors. Hope you find a good one for
yourself.

I'm drinking Wu Dong Bai Yie Dan Cong this morning and I feel as though I've
been forged and reborn. I'm listening to Zaire popular music from 30 years
ago. This is, as many know and all should, the best music the world has yet
produced. It goes perfectly with Phoenix Oolongs of any stripe.

Michael

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Old 03-02-2004, 12:46 PM
Michael Plant
 
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Default tea and sandwiches?

Leif 2/2/04



"Ole Kvaal" wrote in message
...
Ole Kvaal wrote:
Michael Plant wrote:
....which reminds me of my Trondhjem story....



!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! !!!!!!!!!??!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


Sorry, I was too surprised to remember to say thanks for your reply :-)
I didn't even imagine someone abroad (I suppose) would know the name
Trondhjem for Trondheim. . . . . .

--

regards,
ole k,
trondheim


From Michael's story about the "unstolen" gear on the motorbike and his use
of "Trondhjem," it was apparent to me that Michael's experience was quite
some time in the past. Crime has come to Norway with a vengeance principally
from all the immigrants that have been allowed in the country. The
Norwegians are never satisfied with their language and have had about five
shifts in "approved" spellings and grammar. Ny Norsk (New Norwegian) is an
attempt to resurrect the earlier Norwegian language prior to the Danish and
Swedish influences. School children are expected to be accomplished in
both. Sort of like learning Spanglish or Ebonics along with a test in
English.Reminds me a bit about the French and their efforts to retain
linguistic purity!

mhv,

Leif Thorvaldson
Eatonville, Washington, USA


Yeah, Norway is one of the more amusing exponents of language purity, but
certainly not the only one that offers entertainment. In a way, it's a bit
of a shame to move your language into a realm where only you can understand
it. After all, Old Norwegean (Gamel Norsk?) is/was pretty assessible to
Danes and Swedes. But, hey, whatever you speak, if you're drinking tea, all
is well. (I'm not sure this applies to Liptons; I'll leave that to ya'll.)

I have pretty strong opinions aboiut "Ebonics". Perhaps this isn't the
place....

Michael

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Old 03-02-2004, 12:46 PM
Mike Petro
 
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Default Eventually, It's All Pu-Erh (was: tea and sandwiches?)

OK Michael, quit teasing ;-)

Tell us more about this 30 year old black, and the cool local shop. I
am culture challenged in that my little town offers nothing beyond
teabag peddlers. Hence my affinity for online sources... The nearest
Chinatown is about 800 miles and the nearest Asian community is about
60 miles away but they offer little more that just an Asian market and
teabag style puerh. Whenever I travel I always go out of my way to
visit tea shops when I can. When I lived in Somerset MA I would go
into Boston's Chinatown but never had a lot of luck finding the really
good stuff.

I would appreciate any local shop recommendations, particularly those
that know about puerh, that RFDT readers could offer. Maybe I can work
one of them in to my next vacation...



On Tue, 03 Feb 2004 11:10:30 GMT, Michael Plant
wrote:

Ole /2/04

BTW, I'm drinking Bamboo Fragrance Green Pu-erh. (Some might
say, "uncooked pu-erh.") Very very nice. From Silk Road Tea. There,
that's for relevance.

Did Pu-erh just once, and it was - eh - very special. Don't expect much
from the local teastore anyway. Later this month I'll start online shopping,
so perhaps I'll find something out there.


Yes, I think in the case of Pu-erh you especially want to get quality. I
recommend -- not that you asked me -- starting with a vendor you can talk
with -- by e-mail at least -- and discuss the specific qualities of the
teas. This afternoon I drank a thirty year old "cooked" pu-erh, which was a
wonderful tea. One of its special qualities was that in the first few
"steeps" it was earthy and bold. Around the fourth steep it started to
become sweeter and sweeter without losing the earthiness; more balance and
style came in later, in other words. BTW, this is a tea from a local
merchant who doesn't sell beyond her little shop and tea drinking place.
Pu-erhs of this quality are available from many places. Mike Petro, Livio,
and others can guide you to European vendors. Hope you find a good one for
yourself.

I'm drinking Wu Dong Bai Yie Dan Cong this morning and I feel as though I've
been forged and reborn. I'm listening to Zaire popular music from 30 years
ago. This is, as many know and all should, the best music the world has yet
produced. It goes perfectly with Phoenix Oolongs of any stripe.

Michael



Mike Petro
http://www.pu-erh.net
remove the "filter" in my email address to reply
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Old 03-02-2004, 12:59 PM
Michael Plant
 
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Default Eventually, It's All Pu-Erh

Mike 2/3/04


OK Michael, quit teasing ;-)

Tell us more about this 30 year old black, and the cool local shop. I
am culture challenged in that my little town offers nothing beyond
teabag peddlers. Hence my affinity for online sources... The nearest
Chinatown is about 800 miles and the nearest Asian community is about
60 miles away but they offer little more that just an Asian market and
teabag style puerh. Whenever I travel I always go out of my way to
visit tea shops when I can. When I lived in Somerset MA I would go
into Boston's Chinatown but never had a lot of luck finding the really
good stuff.

I would appreciate any local shop recommendations, particularly those
that know about puerh, that RFDT readers could offer. Maybe I can work
one of them in to my next vacation...



The teashop in question is called "Big Apple." It is in Manhattan, New York
City, on Howard Street one little block north of Canal Street, and between
Broadway and Lafayette Streets. It serves most tea rather professionally,
but friendily in gungfu style. Gaiwan service is also available. They carry
only two pu-erhs, one of which I'm referring to. When you come to NYC, we'll
take you on the grand teahouse tour. We have several of different styles,
well worth visiting. Big Apple Tea House is a Lew Perin find.

I have nothing but the owner's word that the pu-erh in question is actually
30 years old. But, the tea's behavior suggests that this is true.

Michael

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Old 03-02-2004, 01:45 PM
Dog Ma 1
 
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Default tea and sandwiches?


"cc" wrote in message
...

Ti Kuan Ying Oolong teas (average quality, light brew, hot or cold) goes
well with about all sort of food. Except maybe smelly cheese, but I don't
think any tea would.



While not a big fan of Limburger-type stinkers, I am addicted to Stilton.
Have found it difficult to get the stuff here in the US - what's for sale
generally started as low-quality production, or (almost universally) has
been mis-handled and tastes awful.

I had the good fortunate recently to have a friend bring over a whole 18-lb
Cropwell Bishop Stilton. It's one of the top makers, and was absolutely
fabulous. I served it at several parties, gave away a bit, and ate most of
it myself (burrrp).

Although the texture falls apart, hard cheeses generally freeze OK. So I put
by a pound or so for emergencies. My first pu-erhs seemed to qualify, so I
pulled out a block and thawed it.

I can now report: really smelly $1.79 tuo-cha pu-erh and Stilton does NOT
work. The powers do not cancel, merge, blend gracefully or transform
magically into something else. It was awful!

But at least I tried.

-DM




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