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Because of my location and the proximity of the stupidmarkets I watch the
prices and buy in bulk.

The markets must think we are idiots with their savings deals but one is
virtually forced into playing their games.

I also carry a little Oscar with some blue ice and an insulated bag.

so there are the tallies:

Ralphs (Kroger) Paid 62.65 Savings $62.59 Like I would have paid the
$125.00
Albertsons Paid $72.82 Savings $72.18 + 3 $5.00 certificates (cash off
your next bill)

The regular prices are NUTS Wishbone Salad Dressing $3.89 Savings 2.23 net
price $1.66.
And so on and so on.

Who are they kidding?

Dimitri

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Dimitri wrote:
> Because of my location and the proximity of the stupidmarkets I watch
> the prices and buy in bulk.
>
> The markets must think we are idiots with their savings deals but one is
> virtually forced into playing their games.
>


Thats why I like the local large family owned market where we buy most
of our stuff and a regional chain. Both sell stuff at fair prices with
no insulting shopper club ID member card and inflated prices on some
items such as "eggs: $2.95/doz, with shopper club ID card $1.95/doz"
when the normal price is that or even less and of course a 3 foot long
tape is produced at the register announcing your "savings". The regional
chain even has a display near the entrance with two carts filled with
the same items. One has the prices if you used a shopper club ID card at
a competitor and one shows the prices if you just paid the normal price
at this store. The normal price is always lower and the carts contain a
fair representation of normal purchases.

> I also carry a little Oscar with some blue ice and an insulated bag.
>
> so there are the tallies:
>
> Ralphs (Kroger) Paid 62.65 Savings $62.59 Like I would have paid the
> $125.00
> Albertsons Paid $72.82 Savings $72.18 + 3 $5.00 certificates (cash
> off your next bill)
>
> The regular prices are NUTS Wishbone Salad Dressing $3.89 Savings 2.23
> net price $1.66.
> And so on and so on.
>
> Who are they kidding?
>
> Dimitri


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Dimitri wrote:
> Because of my location and the proximity of the stupidmarkets I watch
> the prices and buy in bulk.
>
> The markets must think we are idiots with their savings deals but one
> is virtually forced into playing their games.
>
> I also carry a little Oscar with some blue ice and an insulated bag.
>

snip
>
> Dimitri


I hope they gave you a 3 cent deduction for providing a bag (Little Oscar)
;o}
Janet


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On Mon, 10 Nov 2008 16:34:57 -0800, "Dimitri" >
wrote:

>The markets must think we are idiots with their savings deals but one is
>virtually forced into playing their games.


Forced? Not really. I think you're smart if you figure out the game
and play it. I am not a player, so I don't do that - OTOH hubby knows
the rotations and plays the game.


--
I never worry about diets. The only carrots that
interest me are the number of carats in a diamond.

Mae West
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On Mon, 10 Nov 2008 16:34:57 -0800, "Dimitri" >
wrote:
>The markets must think we are idiots with their savings deals but one is
>virtually forced into playing their games.
>
>Who are they kidding?
>

My local FRY's Grocery prices everything at 150%.

When you use your club-card, they reduce the price
to 100%, then brag about how much $$ they've saved you.
( their "reduced" price is still spendy )

I can't wait for a WalMart supercenter to come to town !



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On Tue, 11 Nov 2008 13:14:34 -0700, "<RJ>" > wrote:


>I can't wait for a WalMart supercenter to come to town !


Not enough evil in your town? Or maybe the local merchants are making
too much money?

Lou
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"<RJ>" > wrote in message
...
> On Mon, 10 Nov 2008 16:34:57 -0800, "Dimitri" >
> wrote:
>>The markets must think we are idiots with their savings deals but one is
>>virtually forced into playing their games.
>>
>>Who are they kidding?
>>

> My local FRY's Grocery prices everything at 150%.
>
> When you use your club-card, they reduce the price
> to 100%, then brag about how much $$ they've saved you.
> ( their "reduced" price is still spendy )
>
> I can't wait for a WalMart supercenter to come to town !



Just moved (a year ago) from a town with a Sams and a Wal Mart Super center
in the same area. I was not impressed with the Super center prices with a
few exceptions.

If you pay attention to prices you can do much better than the Super Center.
Occasionally they did have some items which were priced competitively but it
was not an across the board discount pricing structure.

Dimitri

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In article >,
Lou Decruss > wrote:

> On Tue, 11 Nov 2008 13:14:34 -0700, "<RJ>" > wrote:
>
>
> >I can't wait for a WalMart supercenter to come to town !

>
> Not enough evil in your town? Or maybe the local merchants are making
> too much money?
>
> Lou


People that deliberately rip you off deserve to be put out of business.
--
Peace! Om

"Our prime purpose in this life is to help others. And if you can't help them, at least don't hurt them." -- Dalai Lama
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On Tue, 11 Nov 2008 17:41:10 -0600, Omelet >
wrote:

>In article >,
> Lou Decruss > wrote:
>
>> On Tue, 11 Nov 2008 13:14:34 -0700, "<RJ>" > wrote:
>>
>>
>> >I can't wait for a WalMart supercenter to come to town !

>>
>> Not enough evil in your town? Or maybe the local merchants are making
>> too much money?
>>
>> Lou

>
>People that deliberately rip you off deserve to be put out of business.


That would be walmart. If you're a fan of theirs we'll have to agree
to disagree.

Lou
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In article >,
"Dimitri" > wrote:

> Because of my location and the proximity of the stupidmarkets I watch the
> prices and buy in bulk.
>
> The markets must think we are idiots with their savings deals but one is
> virtually forced into playing their games.
>
> I also carry a little Oscar with some blue ice and an insulated bag.
>
> so there are the tallies:
>
> Ralphs (Kroger) Paid 62.65 Savings $62.59 Like I would have paid the
> $125.00
> Albertsons Paid $72.82 Savings $72.18 + 3 $5.00 certificates (cash off
> your next bill)
>
> The regular prices are NUTS Wishbone Salad Dressing $3.89 Savings 2.23 net
> price $1.66.
> And so on and so on.
>
> Who are they kidding?


There are lots of people who are fooled by such tactics. It reminds me
of when I bought an airline ticket to attend a conference last year for
work. My employer's travel agent had the nerve to tell me that they
saved my employer a lot of money on the ticket, something like $150. If
I could have bought that airline ticket online, I guarantee, I would
have gotten a much lower rate. As it stands though, for me, its a moot
point now since my employer has banned all out-of-state travel. People
fall for such tactics; otherwise, retailers wouldn't use them.


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In article >,
"Dimitri" > wrote:

> "<RJ>" > wrote in message
> ...
> > On Mon, 10 Nov 2008 16:34:57 -0800, "Dimitri" >
> > wrote:
> >>The markets must think we are idiots with their savings deals but one is
> >>virtually forced into playing their games.
> >>
> >>Who are they kidding?
> >>

> > My local FRY's Grocery prices everything at 150%.
> >
> > When you use your club-card, they reduce the price
> > to 100%, then brag about how much $$ they've saved you.
> > ( their "reduced" price is still spendy )
> >
> > I can't wait for a WalMart supercenter to come to town !

>
>
> Just moved (a year ago) from a town with a Sams and a Wal Mart Super center
> in the same area. I was not impressed with the Super center prices with a
> few exceptions.
>
> If you pay attention to prices you can do much better than the Super Center.
> Occasionally they did have some items which were priced competitively but it
> was not an across the board discount pricing structure.


I truly hate Walmarts. First, shoppers really aren't saving money there
because they pay their employees so little that they end up needing food
stamps and other welfare handouts just to get by so they are healthy
enough to work for the slave wages there. Second, Walmarts are outright
depressing and I find a lot of their groceries to be of lessor quality
then supermarket products. For example, meat that I have bought from
Walmart tends to be watered down and not as flavorful as the meat from
nearby supermarkets. I find Walmarts more inconvenient because they
almost always have long lines to check-out. The self-check out registers
are mostly out of order or have long lines because some customers always
get confused by them.

What little money I save after factoring in the cost of my time to shop
at Walmart is better spent elsewhere.
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I patronize the market (big chain) which is less than a mile away.
My next choice is another chain's location five miles away. I find
that both are pretty darn close in pricing, so I choose convenience.
There are absolutely NO independents in the area. Also, the nearer
market does NOT package the produce and I can hand pick. They are open
more hours. Even the parking lot is easier to navigate.
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Dimitri wrote:
>
> "<RJ>" > wrote in message
> ...
>> On Mon, 10 Nov 2008 16:34:57 -0800, "Dimitri" >
>> wrote:
>>> The markets must think we are idiots with their savings deals but one is
>>> virtually forced into playing their games.
>>>
>>> Who are they kidding?
>>>

>> My local FRY's Grocery prices everything at 150%.
>>
>> When you use your club-card, they reduce the price
>> to 100%, then brag about how much $$ they've saved you.
>> ( their "reduced" price is still spendy )
>>
>> I can't wait for a WalMart supercenter to come to town !

>
>
> Just moved (a year ago) from a town with a Sams and a Wal Mart Super
> center in the same area. I was not impressed with the Super center
> prices with a few exceptions.
>
> If you pay attention to prices you can do much better than the Super
> Center. Occasionally they did have some items which were priced
> competitively but it was not an across the board discount pricing
> structure.
>
> Dimitri


Marketing is a powerful thing. They are told about the wonders of big
box and believe it is the only way. I have mentioned the large family
owned store we buy most of our food from to people and get comments like
"it must be dirty", or "I stopped there and the deli meat was stale".
The senior family member is extremely anal about cleanliness and the
deli has a minimum of three people working it (ant typically more)
because of the huge volume they do that it would be next to impossible
to have stale product.
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George > wrote in message
...
[snip]
> Marketing is a powerful thing. They are told about the
> wonders of big box and believe it is the only way. I
> have mentioned the large family owned store we buy
> most of our food from to people and get comments
> like "it must be dirty", or "I stopped there and the
> deli meat was stale". The senior family member is
> extremely anal about cleanliness and the deli has a
> minimum of three people working it (and typically
> more) because of the huge volume they do that it
> would be next to impossible to have stale product.


I get similar comments, especially regarding "pricing" of the
staples. There's just no getting through to the sheeple that
quote $afeway's Club Prices and Lucky's "Deal Busters" as
cheaper nor of similar quality. The two family-owned grocery
stores I hit weekly not only _save_ me money on most items
(because I am aware of price between stores) but also carry a
wider selection of product because a Suit hasn't run his
numbers and gotten his bonus check off reducing my selection.

The comment that really set me off on my BIL was when we
compared deli products. He was so proud of the "smoked turkey"
he got for $5.99/lb. It was one of the worst deli products I'd
ever had; gummy/mushy, falling apart, soaking wet with injected
water, and the "smoke" was oozing from the meat. I gave him a
slice of the smoked turkey I'd purchased from the grocer I use,
for $6.99; more firm, definite smoke flavor, and no standing
water. "Yeah but it 'tastes' funny."

Enjoy your savings there bub... Food as fuel.

The Ranger


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On Wed, 12 Nov 2008 06:58:10 -0500, Stan Horwitz wrote:

> I truly hate Walmarts.


> The self-check out registers
> are mostly out of order or have long lines because some customers always
> get confused by them.


<snort>

your pal,
blake


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In article >,
says...
> In article >,
> "Dimitri" > wrote:
>
> > "<RJ>" > wrote in message
> > ...
> > > On Mon, 10 Nov 2008 16:34:57 -0800, "Dimitri" >
> > > wrote:
> > >>The markets must think we are idiots with their savings deals but one is
> > >>virtually forced into playing their games.
> > >>
> > >>Who are they kidding?
> > >>
> > > My local FRY's Grocery prices everything at 150%.
> > >
> > > When you use your club-card, they reduce the price
> > > to 100%, then brag about how much $$ they've saved you.
> > > ( their "reduced" price is still spendy )
> > >
> > > I can't wait for a WalMart supercenter to come to town !

> >
> >
> > Just moved (a year ago) from a town with a Sams and a Wal Mart Super center
> > in the same area. I was not impressed with the Super center prices with a
> > few exceptions.
> >
> > If you pay attention to prices you can do much better than the Super Center.
> > Occasionally they did have some items which were priced competitively but it
> > was not an across the board discount pricing structure.

>
> I truly hate Walmarts. First, shoppers really aren't saving money there
> because they pay their employees so little that they end up needing food
> stamps and other welfare handouts just to get by so they are healthy
> enough to work for the slave wages there. Second, Walmarts are outright
> depressing and I find a lot of their groceries to be of lessor quality
> then supermarket products. For example, meat that I have bought from
> Walmart tends to be watered down and not as flavorful as the meat from
> nearby supermarkets. I find Walmarts more inconvenient because they
> almost always have long lines to check-out. The self-check out registers
> are mostly out of order or have long lines because some customers always
> get confused by them.
>
> What little money I save after factoring in the cost of my time to shop
> at Walmart is better spent elsewhere.
>


Self checkouts, there's my hot button issue. If you don't know how to
use it either ask for help or move to a line with a cashier. It's not
rocket science.
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T wrote:


> Self checkouts, there's my hot button issue. If you don't know how to
> use it either ask for help or move to a line with a cashier. It's not
> rocket science.



It's my button issue too, but apparently in a different way. I refuse to
use them. I still like to deal with humans.
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"Dave Smith" > wrote in message
...
>T wrote:
>
>
>> Self checkouts, there's my hot button issue. If you don't know how to use
>> it either ask for help or move to a line with a cashier. It's not rocket
>> science.

>
>
> It's my button issue too, but apparently in a different way. I refuse to
> use them. I still like to deal with humans.


Same here. If they give me a 10% discount for doing the labor, I may change
my mind. What gets me is that they have an attendant for the four or six
lanes and he stands around as there is no one using them. Meantime, the
real cashiers are getting backed up with no express open.


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"Lou Decruss" > wrote in message
>
> Unfortunately that's a benchmark set by macdonalds and other low end
> food choices. When people taste better food they don't like it. I
> know someone who takes his family to macdonalds twice a week. I asked
> why he didn't go to a real restaurant for a good burger and he said
> nothing else tasted as good. Uggg.


Fortunately there are still a few good specialty stores, ethnic stores and
even Whole Foods that carry some decent items. We've become a Wonder Bread
society and think that is top of the line. I have to drive 30 mile one way
to get decent rye bread. While in the neighborhood, I'll get some good
meats at another store that still makes their own kielbasa and smoked meats.

When I lived in Philly, we had three good Italian bakeries in a short
distance for bread and rolls. I miss that sort of thing. Even if I didn't
move away I'd be out of luck as they've all since closed.




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On Wed 12 Nov 2008 08:59:45p, Ed Pawlowski told us...

>
> "Dave Smith" > wrote in message
> ...
>>T wrote:
>>
>>
>>> Self checkouts, there's my hot button issue. If you don't know how to
>>> use it either ask for help or move to a line with a cashier. It's not
>>> rocket science.

>>
>>
>> It's my button issue too, but apparently in a different way. I refuse
>> to use them. I still like to deal with humans.

>
> Same here. If they give me a 10% discount for doing the labor, I may
> change my mind. What gets me is that they have an attendant for the four
> or six lanes and he stands around as there is no one using them.
> Meantime, the real cashiers are getting backed up with no express open.


I have a lot of button issues, not the least of which is anyone, either in
a self-check line or a regular checkout line, that doesn't know how to use
the damned card reader for their debit/credit cards, much less knowing
where to insert the cash if that's what they're using. Worse yet, in a
way, are the damned idiots that are writing a check or paying cash at a
regular checkout, but don't bother to even look for either until the clerk
tells them the total. Do they think it's going to be free? I don't write
checks anymore, but when I did I always had it filled out in advance except
for the total amount.

If I have 2-3 bags worth of items, I'd much prefer using the self-check
line because I can scan it, bag it the way I want it, and pay for it more
quickly and I don't have to engage in small talk in the regular checkout.
If I have a heaping cart full, I'll use the regular checkout, but I make
every effort to organize the productson the conveyer and to keep
conversation to a minimum. To do otherwise just slows down the process.

Ideally, I prefer having the least possible interaction with staff in most
places like supermarkets, banks, etc. It's a waste of time, unless I
actually need to get information from them.

--
Wayne Boatwright
(correct the spelling of "geemail" to reply)

************************************************** **********************
Date: Wednesday, 11(XI)/12(XII)/08(MMVIII)
************************************************** **********************
Countdown till U.S. Thanksgiving Day
2wks 2hrs 52mins
************************************************** **********************
There are only 2000 real people in the world -- the rest are bad
special effects.
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Lou Decruss wrote:
> On Wed, 12 Nov 2008 07:31:26 -0800, "The Ranger"
> > wrote:
>
>> The comment that really set me off on my BIL was when we
>> compared deli products. He was so proud of the "smoked turkey"
>> he got for $5.99/lb. It was one of the worst deli products I'd
>> ever had; gummy/mushy, falling apart, soaking wet with injected
>> water, and the "smoke" was oozing from the meat. I gave him a
>> slice of the smoked turkey I'd purchased from the grocer I use,
>> for $6.99; more firm, definite smoke flavor, and no standing
>> water. "Yeah but it 'tastes' funny."

>
> Unfortunately that's a benchmark set by macdonalds and other low end
> food choices. When people taste better food they don't like it. I
> know someone who takes his family to macdonalds twice a week. I asked
> why he didn't go to a real restaurant for a good burger and he said
> nothing else tasted as good. Uggg. We had the same thing happen with
> our daughter when she came home from college hungry and headed
> straight for the fridge. We had just shopped and it was full of all
> kinds of stuff. She closed the doors and said there wasn't anything
> in there except condiments and asked for money to go out. She was
> looking for something frozen and in a box. That's what she was used
> to. I noticed that with all our kids the longer they were away the
> more their food tastes declined.
>
> Lou


I guess I don't get it either. There is a little deli in my town that
makes great fresh subs using buns from the Italian bakery that is one
town over. They use quality meats and the price is probably 25% less
than the big box chains like subway. I mention the place whenever I get
a chance and I get reactions such as "the bun was crispy so it must have
been old" or even more important when food quality is concerned "they
don't have a touch screen display where I can place my order"
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Wayne Boatwright > fnord
5.250:

> On Wed 12 Nov 2008 08:59:45p, Ed Pawlowski told us...
>
>>
>> "Dave Smith" > wrote in message
>> ...
>>>T wrote:
>>>
>>>
>>>> Self checkouts, there's my hot button issue. If you don't know how
>>>> to use it either ask for help or move to a line with a cashier.
>>>> It's not rocket science.
>>>
>>>
>>> It's my button issue too, but apparently in a different way. I
>>> refuse to use them. I still like to deal with humans.

>>
>> Same here. If they give me a 10% discount for doing the labor, I may
>> change my mind. What gets me is that they have an attendant for the
>> four or six lanes and he stands around as there is no one using them.
>> Meantime, the real cashiers are getting backed up with no express
>> open.

>
> I have a lot of button issues, not the least of which is anyone,
> either in a self-check line or a regular checkout line, that doesn't
> know how to use the damned card reader for their debit/credit cards,
> much less knowing where to insert the cash if that's what they're
> using. Worse yet, in a way, are the damned idiots that are writing a
> check or paying cash at a regular checkout, but don't bother to even
> look for either until the clerk tells them the total. Do they think
> it's going to be free? I don't write checks anymore, but when I did I
> always had it filled out in advance except for the total amount.
>
> If I have 2-3 bags worth of items, I'd much prefer using the
> self-check line because I can scan it, bag it the way I want it, and
> pay for it more quickly and I don't have to engage in small talk in
> the regular checkout. If I have a heaping cart full, I'll use the
> regular checkout, but I make every effort to organize the productson
> the conveyer and to keep conversation to a minimum. To do otherwise
> just slows down the process.
>
> Ideally, I prefer having the least possible interaction with staff in
> most places like supermarkets, banks, etc. It's a waste of time,
> unless I actually need to get information from them.
>


I prefer going to a regular checkout lane unless I only have a few
things. One of my local supermarkets recently opened "no limit" self-
checkout lanes... more hassle than it is worth. Having worked as a
cashier, I like to think that choosing the manned registers helps folks
keep their jobs. Though most of them still can't bag for shit (it was
better before they installed those stupid bag carousels)


--
Saerah

"Welcome to Usenet, Biatch! Adapt or haul ass!"
- some hillbilly from FL
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"Ed Pawlowski" > fnord
:

>
> "Lou Decruss" > wrote in message
>>
>> Unfortunately that's a benchmark set by macdonalds and other low end
>> food choices. When people taste better food they don't like it. I
>> know someone who takes his family to macdonalds twice a week. I
>> asked why he didn't go to a real restaurant for a good burger and he
>> said nothing else tasted as good. Uggg.

>
> Fortunately there are still a few good specialty stores, ethnic stores
> and even Whole Foods that carry some decent items. We've become a
> Wonder Bread society and think that is top of the line. I have to
> drive 30 mile one way to get decent rye bread. While in the
> neighborhood, I'll get some good meats at another store that still
> makes their own kielbasa and smoked meats.
>
> When I lived in Philly, we had three good Italian bakeries in a short
> distance for bread and rolls. I miss that sort of thing. Even if I
> didn't move away I'd be out of luck as they've all since closed.
>
>
>


When I have a small grocery list, I try and shop at the locally owned
stores. I can't afford to do all my shopping at one store, though. My ex
SIL does most of her shopping at a Kroger, and doesn't check prices or
pay attention to sales. If I were in the position to not have to watch
sales, I sure as hell wouldn't shop at a Kroger. I won't shop at Kroger
*now* because the regular prices are just as high as the small, locally
owned places, and the quality is much, much lower for produce and meats.
They also have those loyalty cards, which I find creepy.

I used to work at a Whole Foods, and there are a lot of great products
there- but few that are not available for comparable prices at any
number of local stores. Seeing how much people would spend there, it
used to upset me a little that they seemed to be shopping there for the
cachet, when their expenditures could be better serving their
commnunity.

--
Saerah

"Welcome to Usenet, Biatch! Adapt or haul ass!"
- some hillbilly from FL
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George wrote:

> I guess I don't get it either. There is a little deli in my town that
> makes great fresh subs using buns from the Italian bakery that is one
> town over. They use quality meats and the price is probably 25% less
> than the big box chains like subway. I mention the place whenever I
> get a chance and I get reactions such as "the bun was crispy so it
> must have been old" or even more important when food quality is
> concerned "they don't have a touch screen display where I can place
> my order"


Oh, geez. I have seen that in a convenience store.

In my town, there is a sub shop like you describe. Very
popular and the subs are way better and cheaper than
what you'd get at a chain.

A number of years ago, they also opened a Blimpie and a
Subway. They're still there, with this place right there, I
have no reason to visit them. Someone goes there, I guess.
They're missing out.

nancy


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"George"
> I guess I don't get it either. There is a little deli in my town that
> makes great fresh subs using buns from the Italian bakery that is one town
> over. They use quality meats and the price is probably 25% less than the
> big box chains like subway. I mention the place whenever I get a chance
> and I get reactions such as "the bun was crispy so it must have been old"
> or even more important when food quality is concerned "they don't have a
> touch screen display where I can place my order"


People who don't know food and when presented with it think it is too strong
tasting. While there ae people working in those factories, I am hping as
things get tight more and more will be forced to seek out the small spot
with the real food. I think 2-3 people in millions of places beats a few
hundred each in 25 places. I hope.


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"Saerah Gray"
> I used to work at a Whole Foods, and there are a lot of great products
> there- but few that are not available for comparable prices at any >
> number of local stores. Seeing how much people would spend there, it >
> used to upset me a little that they seemed to be shopping there for the >
> cachet, when their expenditures could be better serving their >
> commnunity.
> Saerah


I didn't find it so in Bethesda. I shopped there because they had things I
couldn't find elsewhere or perhaps I would have had to crisscross Washington
to get them.
They sold a wide variety of cheeses, tiny vegetables, organic chicken back
when no other supermarket sold them. I reckoned they got their cachet from
my shopping htere.


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"Giusi" > wrote in message

> "George"
>> I guess I don't get it either. There is a little deli in my town that
>> makes great fresh subs using buns from the Italian bakery that is
>> one town over. They use quality meats and the price is probably 25%
>> less than the big box chains like subway. I mention the place
>> whenever I get a chance and I get reactions such as "the bun was
>> crispy so it must have been old" or even more important when food
>> quality is concerned "they don't have a touch screen display where I
>> can place my order"

>
> People who don't know food and when presented with it think it is too
> strong tasting. While there ae people working in those factories, I
> am hping as things get tight more and more will be forced to seek out
> the small spot with the real food. I think 2-3 people in millions of
> places beats a few hundred each in 25 places. I hope.


To me, "mild" is a synonym for "tasteless" but a number of people seem
to disagree :-)

--
James Silverton
Potomac, Maryland

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On Nov 12, 1:38*pm, "<RJ>" > wrote:
> On Wed, 12 Nov 2008 06:58:10 -0500, Stan Horwitz >
> wrote:
>
>
>
> >I truly hate Walmarts.

>
> >What little money I save after factoring in the cost of my time to shop
> >at Walmart is better spent elsewhere.

>
> I guess it's a matter of perception.
> I shop WalMart for dry-goods.
>
> My nearest WalMart grocer is some 70 miles away,
> and, it's worth the monthly trip to stock the pantry.


It's worth gas for 140 miles plus all the time spent ( I'm assuming
you spend 2-2.5 hours on the road) ?

Those must be some significant savings!

John Kane Kingston ON Canada
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In article >,
Dave Smith > wrote:

> T wrote:
>
>
> > Self checkouts, there's my hot button issue. If you don't know how to
> > use it either ask for help or move to a line with a cashier. It's not
> > rocket science.

>
>
> It's my button issue too, but apparently in a different way. I refuse to
> use them. I still like to deal with humans.


Ditto. I detest self-checkout lines.

I don't trust them with my debit card. Heard/read too many stories of
double charges.
--
Peace! Om

"Our prime purpose in this life is to help others. And if you can't help them, at least don't hurt them." -- Dalai Lama


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Omelet wrote on Thu, 13 Nov 2008 12:47:17 -0600:

>> T wrote:
>>
> >> Self checkouts, there's my hot button issue. If you don't
> >> know how to use it either ask for help or move to a line
> >> with a cashier. It's not rocket science.

>>
>> It's my button issue too, but apparently in a different way.
>> I refuse to use them. I still like to deal with humans.


> Ditto. I detest self-checkout lines.


> I don't trust them with my debit card. Heard/read too many
> stories of double charges.


I tend to agree about disliking self-checkout especially for produce
items without bar codes that have to be found on a monitor tho' there is
a trend to having coding machines in the produce section. I don't have a
debit card by choice.
--

James Silverton
Potomac, Maryland

Email, with obvious alterations: not.jim.silverton.at.verizon.not

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On Thu, 13 Nov 2008 16:31:03 +0100, Giusi wrote:

> "Saerah Gray"
>> I used to work at a Whole Foods, and there are a lot of great products
>> there- but few that are not available for comparable prices at any >
>> number of local stores. Seeing how much people would spend there, it >
>> used to upset me a little that they seemed to be shopping there for the >
>> cachet, when their expenditures could be better serving their >
>> commnunity.
>> Saerah

>
> I didn't find it so in Bethesda. I shopped there because they had things I
> couldn't find elsewhere or perhaps I would have had to crisscross Washington
> to get them.
> They sold a wide variety of cheeses, tiny vegetables, organic chicken back
> when no other supermarket sold them. I reckoned they got their cachet from
> my shopping htere.


they still talk about you in bethesda, honey.

your pal,
blake
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On Thu, 13 Nov 2008 08:46:41 -0500, George wrote:
>
> I guess I don't get it either. There is a little deli in my town that
> makes great fresh subs using buns from the Italian bakery that is one
> town over. They use quality meats and the price is probably 25% less
> than the big box chains like subway. I mention the place whenever I get
> a chance and I get reactions such as "the bun was crispy so it must have
> been old" or even more important when food quality is concerned "they
> don't have a touch screen display where I can place my order"


subway is pretty grim. 'our cruddy bread is fresh-baked every day!'

your pal,
jared


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In article >,
"James Silverton" > wrote:

> Omelet wrote on Thu, 13 Nov 2008 12:47:17 -0600:
>
> >> T wrote:
> >>
> > >> Self checkouts, there's my hot button issue. If you don't
> > >> know how to use it either ask for help or move to a line
> > >> with a cashier. It's not rocket science.
> >>
> >> It's my button issue too, but apparently in a different way.
> >> I refuse to use them. I still like to deal with humans.

>
> > Ditto. I detest self-checkout lines.

>
> > I don't trust them with my debit card. Heard/read too many
> > stories of double charges.

>
> I tend to agree about disliking self-checkout especially for produce
> items without bar codes that have to be found on a monitor tho' there is
> a trend to having coding machines in the produce section. I don't have a
> debit card by choice.


I've been using the bar code sticker maker scales in the produce section
a LOT lately. Speeds things up at the checkouts, especially if the
clerks don't know their veggies.

I'm a recent convert to debit cards. Saves a lot of time at the register
and I keep the receipt with the card to enter soonest in the check
ledger. I did run out of room in the check ledger tho' and have
switched to a small spiral notebook to keep track.

I still log all debits just like checks. To not do so is pure idiocy.

It does slightly complicate monthly accounting when comparing the ledger
to the bank statement, but it's do-able. Just takes a bit more time to
match everything.
--
Peace! Om

"Our prime purpose in this life is to help others. And if you can't help them, at least don't hurt them." -- Dalai Lama
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On Thu, 13 Nov 2008 09:12:44 -0500, Nancy Young wrote:

> George wrote:
>
>> I guess I don't get it either. There is a little deli in my town that
>> makes great fresh subs using buns from the Italian bakery that is one
>> town over. They use quality meats and the price is probably 25% less
>> than the big box chains like subway. I mention the place whenever I
>> get a chance and I get reactions such as "the bun was crispy so it
>> must have been old" or even more important when food quality is
>> concerned "they don't have a touch screen display where I can place
>> my order"

>
> Oh, geez. I have seen that in a convenience store.
>
> In my town, there is a sub shop like you describe. Very
> popular and the subs are way better and cheaper than
> what you'd get at a chain.
>
> A number of years ago, they also opened a Blimpie and a
> Subway. They're still there, with this place right there, I
> have no reason to visit them. Someone goes there, I guess.
> They're missing out.
>
> nancy


i encountered my first 'blimpie base' in new york city. christ, what lousy
subs. i assumed it was a front for some mafia money-laundering operation.

your pal,
blake


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blake wrote on Thu, 13 Nov 2008 19:09:56 GMT:

> On Thu, 13 Nov 2008 08:46:41 -0500, George wrote:
>>
>> I guess I don't get it either. There is a little deli in my
>> town that makes great fresh subs using buns from the Italian
>> bakery that is one town over. They use quality meats and the
>> price is probably 25% less than the big box chains like
>> subway. I mention the place whenever I get a chance and I get
>> reactions such as "the bun was crispy so it must have been
>> old" or even more important when food quality is concerned
>> "they don't have a touch screen display where I can place my
>> order"


> subway is pretty grim. 'our cruddy bread is fresh-baked every
> day!'


I wonder why Subway can't use bread with a decent crust instead of a
plastic sponge texture? Even Giant sells acceptable submarine rolls.

--

James Silverton
Potomac, Maryland

Email, with obvious alterations: not.jim.silverton.at.verizon.not

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Reading through this thread - I believe I am so lucky to live in a small
town. there is one larger grocery store (Big M chain), a few small
convenience stores and a few take out fast food places. The people at the
grocery call me by name, help me with reaching things (I have to use an
electric scooter cart) will take my purchases out to my car if asked, no
self checkout.

There are larger stores 15 miles away - a stretch physically for me to drive
that distance and shop (I am disabled). the prices locally might be higher
but since I watch for sales and use coupons, the extra expense of traveling
to the 'city' is not cost effective. The produce is fresh and a rather good
selection - store makes it a policy to frequently deal with local growers in
season. And there are a number of roadside small stands within a reasonable
distance during growing season.

The fast food places - again I deal with the small locally owned and/or
managed places - when I deal with them at all.

Sometimes living in a small rural area can have its benefits - even if the
choice of specialty food items is not available.

JonquilJan (who used to live in NYC - but wouldn't go back)

Learn something new every day
As long as you are learning, you are living
When you stop learning, you start dying


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<RJ> said...

> On Mon, 10 Nov 2008 16:34:57 -0800, "Dimitri" >
> wrote:
>>The markets must think we are idiots with their savings deals but one is
>>virtually forced into playing their games.
>>
>>Who are they kidding?
>>

> My local FRY's Grocery prices everything at 150%.
>
> When you use your club-card, they reduce the price
> to 100%, then brag about how much $$ they've saved you.
> ( their "reduced" price is still spendy )


> I can't wait for a WalMart supercenter to come to town !



I pay too much at the ACME chain here in PA, meanwhile a friend in L.A.
confounds me with his prices at Albertsons (ACME's parent) that are
seriously dirt cheap compared to here.

Makes me want to go to Kalifornia to supermarket shop!

Wegmans (northeast regional) just announced a 10-20% reduction on popular
food items but most of those are the Wegmans brands of stuff. Too bad
they're so far away from me, any savings I'd probably use up in gasoline
getting there and back.

For bulk items I shop at BJ's Wholesale club. I wish they'd put food prices
on their website! Instead, they force you to come in and hunt and peck
around. And they're not always cheap either.

Andy
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On Thu, 13 Nov 2008 19:12:03 GMT, blake murphy
> wrote:

>On Thu, 13 Nov 2008 09:12:44 -0500, Nancy Young wrote:


>> In my town, there is a sub shop like you describe. Very
>> popular and the subs are way better and cheaper than
>> what you'd get at a chain.
>>
>> A number of years ago, they also opened a Blimpie and a
>> Subway. They're still there, with this place right there, I
>> have no reason to visit them. Someone goes there, I guess.
>> They're missing out.
>>
>> nancy

>
>i encountered my first 'blimpie base' in new york city. christ, what lousy
>subs. i assumed it was a front for some mafia money-laundering operation.
>
>your pal,
>blake


I'd add Jimmy Johns to the list of crap sandwiches. A few weeks ago I
did a gig and the client was insistent on getting me lunch. I didn't
know the menu so I told her to surprise me. She got me the roast
beef. There was two thin slices of meat, a little mayo, a bit of
nasty lettuce, and three paper thin tomatoes. I tasted like crap on
top of needed at least double the ingredients. I'd have been really
****ed if I had paid for it. Unfortunately the clients eat there all
the time and love it.

Lou
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"Giusi" > fnord
:

> "Saerah Gray"
>> I used to work at a Whole Foods, and there are a lot of great
>> products there- but few that are not available for comparable prices
>> at any > number of local stores. Seeing how much people would spend
>> there, it > used to upset me a little that they seemed to be shopping
>> there for the > cachet, when their expenditures could be better
>> serving their > commnunity.
>> Saerah

>
> I didn't find it so in Bethesda. I shopped there because they had
> things I couldn't find elsewhere or perhaps I would have had to
> crisscross Washington to get them.
> They sold a wide variety of cheeses, tiny vegetables, organic chicken
> back when no other supermarket sold them. I reckoned they got their
> cachet from my shopping htere.
>
>
>


Well, I live in Metro Detroit- there are a number of local natural foods
and gourmet stores that carry comparable products- not to mention local
producers of organic meats. That is my experience.
--
Saerah

"Welcome to Usenet, Biatch! Adapt or haul ass!"
- some hillbilly from FL
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