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"Wayne Boatwright" wrote

>> Same here. If they give me a 10% discount for doing the labor, I may
>> change my mind. What gets me is that they have an attendant for the four


Me, I like to keep folks working.

When I was young, 'self gas stations' were rare. Now, it is almost
imposible to find one with someone to pump the gas if you need it. They are
'supposed' to help those with disability plates, but they dont. Helped many
a person who was mobility impared when no one would come out.

> I have a lot of button issues, not the least of which is anyone, either in
> a self-check line or a regular checkout line, that doesn't know how to use
> the damned card reader for their debit/credit cards, much less knowing
> where to insert the cash if that's what they're using. Worse yet, in a


When I came back in 2007 aer being gone before 9/11/2001, I found a world of
new checkout tools and since I didnt grow with them (they were not there
when I left) I sometimes had to ask for minor help.

I prefill as much of the check as possible, but cashiers no longer process
them as fast as they used to.

> If I have 2-3 bags worth of items, I'd much prefer using the self-check
> line because I can scan it, bag it the way I want it, and pay for it more


I tried that but the majority of what I need and get are fresh veggies and
fruits that have to be weighed and some arcane number punched in. It';s
faster for me and less frustrating for others if i go the normal checkout.
I may after all have as many as 50 things that need to be weighed and a code
punched in.



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"James Silverton" > wrote in message
>
>> subway is pretty grim. 'our cruddy bread is fresh-baked every
>> day!'

>
> I wonder why Subway can't use bread with a decent crust instead of a
> plastic sponge texture? Even Giant sells acceptable submarine rolls.
>
> --
>
> James Silverton
> Potomac, Maryland


I've actually heard people say the one reason they go to Subway is because
the bread is so good. See George's earlier post about crispy. Some people
have no clue.

One morning my wife was making breakfast and I suggested that I'd go get
some fresh bread. The Price Chopper has a decent Tuscan Loaf. I'm planning
to rush home with it while still warm and fresh. So, I ask the clerk for a
loaf and as she put it in the bag she asks, "It's warm, do you still want
it?"


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cshenk wrote:

> When I was young, 'self gas stations' were rare. Now, it is almost
> imposible to find one with someone to pump the gas if you need it.
> They are 'supposed' to help those with disability plates, but they
> dont. Helped many a person who was mobility impared when no one would
> come out.


I haven't the vaguest idea why people knock us not having
self serve. You pull up, a nice person comes over and pumps
your gas. It's great!

nancy
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On Thu 13 Nov 2008 07:35:52p, cshenk told us...

> "Wayne Boatwright" wrote
>
>>> Same here. If they give me a 10% discount for doing the labor, I may
>>> change my mind. What gets me is that they have an attendant for the
>>> four

>
> Me, I like to keep folks working.


I agree with that. If thereís an empty checker, Iíll get in their line,
but most often the lines are crowded. I donít think their wanting for
work.

> When I was young, 'self gas stations' were rare. Now, it is almost
> imposible to find one with someone to pump the gas if you need it. They
> are 'supposed' to help those with disability plates, but they dont.
> Helped many a person who was mobility impared when no one would come
> out.


Iíve done that, too, and am always happy to do so.

>> I have a lot of button issues, not the least of which is anyone, either
>> in a self-check line or a regular checkout line, that doesn't know how
>> to use the damned card reader for their debit/credit cards, much less
>> knowing where to insert the cash if that's what they're using. Worse
>> yet, in a

>
> When I came back in 2007 aer being gone before 9/11/2001, I found a
> world of new checkout tools and since I didnt grow with them (they were
> not there when I left) I sometimes had to ask for minor help.


Naturally, and so would I. However, the machines came in gradually, and I
canít believe the number of people who still seem to be totally clueless in
using them.

> I prefill as much of the check as possible, but cashiers no longer
> process them as fast as they used to.


Youíre doing it right. Itís the people (usually women) who havenít even
bothered to take the checkbook out of their purse and are usually yammering
on their cell phone paying no attention to the cashier or what progress her
order is in.

>> If I have 2-3 bags worth of items, I'd much prefer using the self-check
>> line because I can scan it, bag it the way I want it, and pay for it
>> more

>
> I tried that but the majority of what I need and get are fresh veggies
> and fruits that have to be weighed and some arcane number punched in.
> It';s faster for me and less frustrating for others if i go the normal
> checkout. I may after all have as many as 50 things that need to be
> weighed and a code punched in.


Machines vary widely from store to store. Most of the stores I frequent
have machines that have touch screens with pictures of the produce. All
you have to do is touch the picture and place the produce on the scanner.

Obviously, too, people have different needs and priorities. I doubt that
the majority of posters here would be the type that drive me nuts.


--
Wayne Boatwright
(correct the spelling of "geemail" to reply)
************************************************** **********************
Date: Thursday, 11(XI)/13(XIII)/08(MMVIII)
************************************************** **********************
Countdown till U.S. Thanksgiving Day
1wks 6dys 3hrs 31mins
************************************************** **********************
All rising to a great place is by a winding stair.
************************************************** **********************

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On Thu 13 Nov 2008 08:03:49p, Ed Pawlowski told us...

>
> "James Silverton" > wrote in message
>>
>>> subway is pretty grim. 'our cruddy bread is fresh-baked every
>>> day!'

>>
>> I wonder why Subway can't use bread with a decent crust instead of a
>> plastic sponge texture? Even Giant sells acceptable submarine rolls.
>>
>> --
>>
>> James Silverton
>> Potomac, Maryland

>
> I've actually heard people say the one reason they go to Subway is
> because the bread is so good. See George's earlier post about crispy.
> Some people have no clue.


Some people couldnít even buy a clue, Ed.

> One morning my wife was making breakfast and I suggested that I'd go get
> some fresh bread. The Price Chopper has a decent Tuscan Loaf. I'm
> planning to rush home with it while still warm and fresh. So, I ask
> the clerk for a loaf and as she put it in the bag she asks, "It's warm,
> do you still want it?"


Apparently this clerk was one of them.


--
Wayne Boatwright
(correct the spelling of "geemail" to reply)
************************************************** **********************
Date: Thursday, 11(XI)/13(XIII)/08(MMVIII)
************************************************** **********************
Countdown till U.S. Thanksgiving Day
1wks 6dys 3hrs 7mins
************************************************** **********************
Insanity is hereditary. You get it from your kids.
************************************************** **********************



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In article 7>,
Wayne Boatwright > wrote:


> I agree with that. If thereís an empty checker, Iíll get in their line,
> but most often the lines are crowded. I donít think their wanting for
> work.


I'm not sure that is correct. There are about three days a year where
all the checkstands are in use. Other than that, there are lines
because there aren't enough checkers. Being retired, I try real hard to
go when the stores aren't busy, so I don't see long lines. But at
certain times, they get busy, and the store can't afford to have enough
checkers on hand to handle the rushes. There's some planning they can
do about times for stocking and when people take breaks, but they can't
have people come in for short shifts or split shifts to handle the
rushes.

--
Dan Abel
Petaluma, California USA

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On Thu 13 Nov 2008 09:03:50p, Dan Abel told us...

> In article 7>,
> Wayne Boatwright > wrote:
>
>
>> I agree with that. If thereís an empty checker, Iíll get in their line,
>> but most often the lines are crowded. I donít think their wanting for
>> work.

>
> I'm not sure that is correct. There are about three days a year where
> all the checkstands are in use. Other than that, there are lines
> because there aren't enough checkers. Being retired, I try real hard to
> go when the stores aren't busy, so I don't see long lines. But at
> certain times, they get busy, and the store can't afford to have enough
> checkers on hand to handle the rushes. There's some planning they can
> do about times for stocking and when people take breaks, but they can't
> have people come in for short shifts or split shifts to handle the
> rushes.


Well, yes, youíre right about that. However, at the moment I happen to be
in the store, I will go to an empty checker if there is one. Otherwise, if
I donít have a cart full of items, I go through self-check.


--
Wayne Boatwright
(correct the spelling of "geemail" to reply)
************************************************** **********************
Date: Thursday, 11(XI)/13(XIII)/08(MMVIII)
************************************************** **********************
Countdown till U.S. Thanksgiving Day
1wks 6dys 2hrs 49mins
************************************************** **********************
But what if I'm a figment of my OWN imagination?
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Wayne Boatwright wrote:

>
> Youíre doing it right. Itís the people (usually women) who havenít even
> bothered to take the checkbook out of their purse and are usually yammering
> on their cell phone paying no attention to the cashier or what progress her
> order is in.


The absolute wort place is the local Joann's fabric store. They are
perpetually understaffed, and the customers there are some checkwritin'
women.

It wouldn't be so bad if they would at least get the damned checkbook
out and fill out everything but the amount. It's not like there's
anything better to do while you're standing in line to pay. But no.
Who knows, maybe this time the cashier won't expect them to pay... And
most of these broads aren't even on the phone. They're just standing
there, staring vacantly into space.

And then the checkbook has to exhumed from its super secret location
within the megapurse. And then there's the search for something to
write with. And producing the ID and the credit card (if you've got a
credit or debit card, for god's sake, why not use it?). And the filling
out of the check register - they don't hold with those newfangled carbon
copy checks...

These women are also the cause of major backups at the cutting table.
Quilters and crafters. Buying dinky pieces of 15 different fabrics,
then having to run back for just one more bolt because they've changed
their mind. Again.

If you ever hear of an incident in a St. Louis area fabric store
involving a quilter with a "fat quarter" stuffed up her butt, you'll
know I finally snapped.

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On Thu 13 Nov 2008 09:19:07p, Kathleen told us...

> Wayne Boatwright wrote:
>
>>
>> Youíre doing it right. Itís the people (usually women) who havenít
>> even bothered to take the checkbook out of their purse and are usually
>> yammering on their cell phone paying no attention to the cashier or
>> what progress her order is in.

>
> The absolute wort place is the local Joann's fabric store. They are
> perpetually understaffed, and the customers there are some checkwritin'
> women.
>
> It wouldn't be so bad if they would at least get the damned checkbook
> out and fill out everything but the amount. It's not like there's
> anything better to do while you're standing in line to pay. But no.
> Who knows, maybe this time the cashier won't expect them to pay... And
> most of these broads aren't even on the phone. They're just standing
> there, staring vacantly into space.
>
> And then the checkbook has to exhumed from its super secret location
> within the megapurse. And then there's the search for something to
> write with. And producing the ID and the credit card (if you've got a
> credit or debit card, for god's sake, why not use it?). And the filling
> out of the check register - they don't hold with those newfangled carbon
> copy checks...
>
> These women are also the cause of major backups at the cutting table.
> Quilters and crafters. Buying dinky pieces of 15 different fabrics,
> then having to run back for just one more bolt because they've changed
> their mind. Again.
>
> If you ever hear of an incident in a St. Louis area fabric store
> involving a quilter with a "fat quarter" stuffed up her butt, you'll
> know I finally snapped.


You really nailed it on the head, Kathleen!


--
Wayne Boatwright
(correct the spelling of "geemail" to reply)
************************************************** **********************
Date: Thursday, 11(XI)/13(XIII)/08(MMVIII)
************************************************** **********************
Countdown till U.S. Thanksgiving Day
1wks 6dys 2hrs 38mins
************************************************** **********************
Physics is not a religion. If it were, we'd have a much easier time
raising money.
************************************************** **********************
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In article 7>,
Wayne Boatwright > wrote:

> On Thu 13 Nov 2008 09:03:50p, Dan Abel told us...
>
> > In article 7>,
> > Wayne Boatwright > wrote:
> >
> >
> >> I agree with that. If thereís an empty checker, Iíll get in their line,
> >> but most often the lines are crowded. I donít think their wanting for
> >> work.

> >
> > I'm not sure that is correct. There are about three days a year where
> > all the checkstands are in use. Other than that, there are lines
> > because there aren't enough checkers. Being retired, I try real hard to
> > go when the stores aren't busy, so I don't see long lines. But at
> > certain times, they get busy, and the store can't afford to have enough
> > checkers on hand to handle the rushes. There's some planning they can
> > do about times for stocking and when people take breaks, but they can't
> > have people come in for short shifts or split shifts to handle the
> > rushes.

>
> Well, yes, youíre right about that. However, at the moment I happen to be
> in the store, I will go to an empty checker if there is one. Otherwise, if
> I donít have a cart full of items, I go through self-check.


OK. I didn't understand what you had posted. We don't have many self
checks. There's a store about ten miles away, but I almost never go
there. My wife goes there sometimes when she's up that way. When I
visited my sister she went through some self checks. I think that I
would use them if we had them.

--
Dan Abel
Petaluma, California USA



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Kathleen wrote:

> The absolute wort place is the local Joann's fabric store. They are
> perpetually understaffed, and the customers there are some
> checkwritin' women.


I would blow my top if I had to shop there often. It's like
torture. All those fiddly little purchases taking forever to
ring up and then the total is like $12 and out comes the
checkbook! OMG. I hardly go there as I don't sew very
often, so it's no big deal, I just chill.

Don't anyone get upset, I don't begrudge the woman a job,
I promise, but the local store's checkout woman is legally
blind. This does not make things go any faster.

> And then the checkbook has to exhumed from its super secret location
> within the megapurse. And then there's the search for something to
> write with. And producing the ID and the credit card (if you've got a
> credit or debit card, for god's sake, why not use it?). And the
> filling out of the check register - they don't hold with those
> newfangled carbon copy checks...


Twice last week I was behind people who wrote checks at the
supermarket. God forbid someone does something wrong, it
takes forever to process. One transaction took so long I
resumed shopping and made it back and she was still there!
Glad I didn't have ice cream. Between the torturous check
writing scenario you describe and the check verfication process,
you wish they'd just say they don't take checks like a lot of
stores do.

I know, the horror, much screaming ensues. (laugh)

nancy
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Nancy Young said...

> Kathleen wrote:
>
>> The absolute wort place is the local Joann's fabric store. They are
>> perpetually understaffed, and the customers there are some
>> checkwritin' women.

>
> I would blow my top if I had to shop there often. It's like
> torture. All those fiddly little purchases taking forever to
> ring up and then the total is like $12 and out comes the
> checkbook! OMG. I hardly go there as I don't sew very
> often, so it's no big deal, I just chill.
>
> Don't anyone get upset, I don't begrudge the woman a job,
> I promise, but the local store's checkout woman is legally
> blind. This does not make things go any faster.
>
>> And then the checkbook has to exhumed from its super secret location
>> within the megapurse. And then there's the search for something to
>> write with. And producing the ID and the credit card (if you've got a
>> credit or debit card, for god's sake, why not use it?). And the
>> filling out of the check register - they don't hold with those
>> newfangled carbon copy checks...

>
> Twice last week I was behind people who wrote checks at the
> supermarket. God forbid someone does something wrong, it
> takes forever to process. One transaction took so long I
> resumed shopping and made it back and she was still there!
> Glad I didn't have ice cream. Between the torturous check
> writing scenario you describe and the check verfication process,
> you wish they'd just say they don't take checks like a lot of
> stores do.
>
> I know, the horror, much screaming ensues. (laugh)
>
> nancy



nancy,

You're the proverbial anti shopper. Everything goes so horribly wrong when
you approach the checkout lane!!!

You might just as well give me your shopping list and wait in your car! I'd
be back in half the time you'd take!!!

Andy
Women!!!
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Andy wrote:
> Nancy Young said...


>> Twice last week I was behind people who wrote checks at the
>> supermarket. God forbid someone does something wrong, it
>> takes forever to process. One transaction took so long I
>> resumed shopping and made it back and she was still there!
>> Glad I didn't have ice cream.


> You're the proverbial anti shopper. Everything goes so horribly wrong
> when you approach the checkout lane!!!


Sometimes it seems that way, but mostly it goes smoothly.
Most people use debit/credit cards.

> You might just as well give me your shopping list and wait in your
> car! I'd be back in half the time you'd take!!!


That's okay, I'm not in a hurry! Unless I have ice cream.

nancy
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Wayne wrote on Fri, 14 Nov 2008 03:37:48 GMT:

> Machines vary widely from store to store. Most of the stores
> I frequent have machines that have touch screens with pictures
> of the produce. All you have to do is touch the picture and
> place the produce on the scanner.


> Obviously, too, people have different needs and priorities. I
> doubt that the majority of posters here would be the type that
> drive me nuts.


Unfortunately, the variety of produce items often means that several
screens have to be searched and, even then, you may end up spelling out
the name on a keyboard. That's not particularly fast. It's also true
that things get slowed down a lot by people who seem to have a need to
write their autobiographies in their check books :-)

--

James Silverton
Potomac, Maryland

Email, with obvious alterations: not.jim.silverton.at.verizon.not

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On Nov 14, 8:28ÔŅĹam, "Nancy Young" > wrote:
>
> Twice last week I was behind people who wrote checks at the
> supermarket. ÔŅĹGod forbid someone does something wrong, it
> takes forever to process. ÔŅĹOne transaction took so long I
> resumed shopping and made it back and she was still there!
> Glad I didn't have ice cream. ÔŅĹBetween the torturous check
> writing scenario you describe and the check verfication process,
> you wish they'd just say they don't take checks like a lot of
> stores do.


Plastic cards are worse than checks... I always seem to get behind
those with a wad of overdrawn cards and they can't remember all their
PINs. I've seen people get on line with two full overflowing carts
and then everyone needs to wait while they choose which half of the
items to remove.

And then there are those with 2-3 separate orders... they need to take
each order back to the rear of the line.

And don't even get me started on the food stamp scams... why do they
have lots of cash for beer, cigs, and scratch cards, because they sell
them back for 75 cents on the dollar. They need to abolish all those
govt free food programs... anyone truly poor and hungry can go to a
food bank/soup kitchen.

There needs to be a line for CASH ONLY.


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"Nancy Young" wrote:
> cshenk wrote:
> > When I was young, 'self gas stations' were rare. ÔŅĹ

>
> I haven't the vaguest idea why people knock us not having
> self serve. ÔŅĹ


Wait a minute... you can't both be young! <G>
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Sheldon wrote:
> "Nancy Young" wrote:
>> cshenk wrote:
>>> When I was young, 'self gas stations' were rare. ÔŅĹ

>>
>> I haven't the vaguest idea why people knock us not having
>> self serve. ÔŅĹ

>
> Wait a minute... you can't both be young! <G>


(laugh) Yup, I'm Young, and in NJ.

nancy

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On Nov 13, 10:03*pm, "Ed Pawlowski" > wrote:
> "James Silverton" > wrote in message
>
> >> subway is pretty grim. *'our cruddy bread is fresh-baked every
> >> day!'

>
> > I wonder why Subway can't use bread with a decent crust instead of a
> > plastic sponge texture? Even Giant sells acceptable submarine rolls.

>
> > --

>
> > James Silverton
> > Potomac, Maryland

>
> I've actually heard people say the one reason they go to Subway is because
> the bread is so good. *See George's earlier post about crispy. *Some people
> have no clue.


Depends on what you want. I like Subway bread for a sub. I would not
eat it otherwise.

>
> One morning my wife was making breakfast and I suggested that I'd go get
> some fresh bread. *The Price Chopper has a decent Tuscan Loaf. *I'm planning
> to rush home with it *while still warm and fresh. *So, I ask the clerk for a
> loaf and as she put it in the bag she asks, "It's warm, do you still want
> it?"


I needed a new bread knife a couple of years ago and decided to hit a
few yard sales before spending 'real' money. When I asked for a bread
knife most of the yardsalers (word?) looked completely blank.

Still there are 3 good bakeries within a Km of me so all is not lost.

John Kane Kingston ON Canada

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In article >,
"Nancy Young" > wrote:

> Andy wrote:
> > Nancy Young said...

>
> >> Twice last week I was behind people who wrote checks at the
> >> supermarket. God forbid someone does something wrong, it
> >> takes forever to process. One transaction took so long I
> >> resumed shopping and made it back and she was still there!
> >> Glad I didn't have ice cream.

>
> > You're the proverbial anti shopper. Everything goes so horribly wrong
> > when you approach the checkout lane!!!

>
> Sometimes it seems that way, but mostly it goes smoothly.
> Most people use debit/credit cards.
>
> > You might just as well give me your shopping list and wait in your
> > car! I'd be back in half the time you'd take!!!

>
> That's okay, I'm not in a hurry! Unless I have ice cream.
>
> nancy


I'm so glad I get to the store around 7 am. <g>

I used to do midnight shopping when I worked swing shifts. Same scenario.

No lines and plenty of good parking!
--
Peace! Om

"Our prime purpose in this life is to help others. And if you can't help them, at least don't hurt them." -- Dalai Lama
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In article >,
"Nancy Young" > wrote:

> cshenk wrote:
>
> > When I was young, 'self gas stations' were rare. Now, it is almost
> > imposible to find one with someone to pump the gas if you need it.
> > They are 'supposed' to help those with disability plates, but they
> > dont. Helped many a person who was mobility impared when no one would
> > come out.

>
> I haven't the vaguest idea why people knock us not having
> self serve. You pull up, a nice person comes over and pumps
> your gas. It's great!


Self serve started gradually here. For a while, towards the end, there
were token full serve pumps, but nobody used them. The surcharge was
US$.50 per gallon. If gas was US$1.499 at the self serve pump, it was
US$1.999 at the full serve pump. That works out to about US$150 per
hour, for someone who probably got 5 minutes training. No thanks. It
would be different if it was faster, but it isn't.

I don't remember the last time I interacted with an employee at a gas
station. Probably in Oregon, which doesn't allow self serve. Here in
California, I drive up to the pump, stick my credit card in, pump the
gas, get my receipt from the pump and drive off.

My local Costco sells gas. I try to buy it there, although it isn't
worth a special trip to me. They have 8 gas lines. Each line has two
pumps (actually there are only 8 pumps, but they are double-sided).
There is one employee on duty. His job is to put out fires and clean up
spills. They take no cash or checks, so the employee never touches
payments.

--
Dan Abel
Petaluma, California USA



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Dan Abel wrote:

> "Nancy Young" > wrote:


>> I haven't the vaguest idea why people knock us not having
>> self serve. You pull up, a nice person comes over and pumps
>> your gas. It's great!

>
> Self serve started gradually here. For a while, towards the end,
> there were token full serve pumps, but nobody used them.


That's what I've seen in my travels, they have full service
pumps to help people who need it, but good luck getting
someone to come help you.
>
> I don't remember the last time I interacted with an employee at a gas
> station. Probably in Oregon, which doesn't allow self serve. Here in
> California, I drive up to the pump, stick my credit card in, pump the
> gas, get my receipt from the pump and drive off.


I just hand my card over, they stick it in the machine and pump
my gas for me, too. I get my receipt and I drive off. And I
pay less that most of the country to boot. It's all good.

nancy
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James Silverton > wrote:

> To me, "mild" is a synonym for "tasteless" but a number of people seem
> to disagree :-)


In Germany, yoghurt is invariably labelled "mild" and is invariably
bland and pointless. Kefir, which is never labelled "mild", is just as
bland. The only milk product of this kind that still has some
recognisable taste and is sold in regular groceries is Sauermilch (sour
milk), which is very much like good kefir, just a bit more liquid. So,
for the past few years, I've been buying faux kumyss (real kumyss is
made with fermented mare's milk; this one is from cow milk), kefir and
ryazhenka (baked yoghurt) from a Russian supermarket (not really
Russian, because most everything they sell is actually produced in
Germany). Those things still have a taste of their own. Kumyss, in
particular, is very intensive-tasting indeed. Very often it is still
fermenting and, though the instructions on the plastic bottle say to
shake it, you'd be a fool to do it, as the bottle is liable to almost
explode in your hands as you open it, spilling its contents all over the
place.

Victor
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Nancy Young wrote:

> Kathleen wrote:
>
>> The absolute wort place is the local Joann's fabric store. They are
>> perpetually understaffed, and the customers there are some
>> checkwritin' women.

>
>
> I would blow my top if I had to shop there often. It's like
> torture. All those fiddly little purchases taking forever to ring up
> and then the total is like $12 and out comes the
> checkbook! OMG. I hardly go there as I don't sew very
> often, so it's no big deal, I just chill.


I operate a specialty sewing business out of my home. Most of the
materials I use - neoprene, leather, tuftek, cordura, spandex, reels of
heavy duty zippers, heavy nylon thread in 8 ounce cones, hundreds of
yards of velcro - can't be found locally. I do about 90% of my
purchases on-line or by phone.

But every now and then I need something or another and I need it right
now, and Hancocks doesn't have it, and I find myself in the armpit of
the sewing world - Joann's.

If I'm wrong about everything and my agnostic ass gets slung through the
portal of hell, I'm hoping I can get credit for time served.

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"Dan Abel" > wrote in message
>
> Self serve started gradually here. For a while, towards the end, there
> were token full serve pumps, but nobody used them. The surcharge was
> US$.50 per gallon.


I'm glad you recognize that the difference is a surcharge, not a saving by
doing your own pumping. I work in Mass and every town decides if it will
allow self service. The ones that do not and have full service only sell at
the same price as the self serve.


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Ed Pawlowski wrote:

>
> "Dan Abel" > wrote in message
>>
>> Self serve started gradually here. For a while, towards the end, there
>> were token full serve pumps, but nobody used them. The surcharge was
>> US$.50 per gallon.

>
> I'm glad you recognize that the difference is a surcharge, not a saving by
> doing your own pumping. I work in Mass and every town decides if it will
> allow self service. The ones that do not and have full service only sell at
> the same price as the self serve.


If I recall, and if nothing's changed, New Jersey and Oregon do not even
allow self-pumping.


--
Blinky
Killing all posts from Google Groups
The Usenet Improvement Project: http://improve-usenet.org
Need a new news feed? http://blinkynet.net/comp/newfeed.html



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On Thu, 13 Nov 2008 19:12:03 GMT, blake murphy
> fired up random neurons and synapses to
opine:

>i encountered my first 'blimpie base' in new york city. christ, what lousy
>subs. i assumed it was a front for some mafia money-laundering operation.


I think my one and only exposure to a "Blimpie" sub was when I was
trapped in steerage on a transcontinental flight. What *is* that
disgusting dressing they put on those things? You can't pick the thing
apart to get away from it.

Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd

--

"Some weasel took the cork out of my lunch!"

-- W.C. Fields

To reply, replace "meatloaf" with "cox"
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