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Default Oriental grocery stores

I like to hit my local Oriental grocery about once a month and I'm
familiar with all of the
'standard" items like noodles, wrappers, soup broths, teas, chili
sauce, dried shrimp etc.

But, I was wondering if it might be interesting to start a post where
others may suggest some things that
maybe I've overlooked and should be a definite.... "you gotta try it".
(Items you can't live without).

I'm not talking about getting responses from native orientals so much
because I can guarantee you stinky tofu and the like are not on my
agenda.....but more interested in responses from those with more
"Americanized" taste buds. (Although I'm a courageous eater -- not a
wimp).

For example, they have a huge frozen section at my mart with all types
of seafood, beef and pork cuts and
I've never ventured into that section. Cuttlefish? All sorts of
names I've never tried.

Anything I'm missing out on?


I'd like to make a list for next time I visit.

Thanks !
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On Wed, 3 Jun 2009 07:57:43 -0700 (PDT), mkr5000 wrote:

> I like to hit my local Oriental grocery about once a month and I'm
> familiar with all of the
> 'standard" items like noodles, wrappers, soup broths, teas, chili
> sauce, dried shrimp etc.
>
> But, I was wondering if it might be interesting to start a post where
> others may suggest some things that
> maybe I've overlooked and should be a definite.... "you gotta try it".
> (Items you can't live without).
>
> I'm not talking about getting responses from native orientals so much
> because I can guarantee you stinky tofu and the like are not on my
> agenda.....but more interested in responses from those with more
> "Americanized" taste buds. (Although I'm a courageous eater -- not a
> wimp).
>
> For example, they have a huge frozen section at my mart with all types
> of seafood, beef and pork cuts and
> I've never ventured into that section. Cuttlefish? All sorts of
> names I've never tried.
>
> Anything I'm missing out on?
>
> I'd like to make a list for next time I visit.
>
> Thanks !


since you already seem to be into the weeds to some extent, you've probably
tried the peeled garlic in tubs (not packed in water). i picked some up a
while back, and have been pleased at how long they have lasted.

your pal,
blake
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mkr5000 said...

> I like to hit my local Oriental grocery about once a month and I'm
> familiar with all of the
> 'standard" items



But you're obviously not familiar that they're Asian, not oriental grocery
stores!??

Andy
--
Eat first, talk later.
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mkr5000 wrote:
> I like to hit my local Oriental grocery about once a month and I'm
> familiar with all of the
> 'standard" items like noodles, wrappers, soup broths, teas, chili
> sauce, dried shrimp etc.
>
> But, I was wondering if it might be interesting to start a post where
> others may suggest some things that
> maybe I've overlooked and should be a definite.... "you gotta try it".
> (Items you can't live without).
>
> I'm not talking about getting responses from native orientals so much
> because I can guarantee you stinky tofu and the like are not on my
> agenda.....but more interested in responses from those with more
> "Americanized" taste buds. (Although I'm a courageous eater -- not a
> wimp).
>
> For example, they have a huge frozen section at my mart with all types
> of seafood, beef and pork cuts and
> I've never ventured into that section. Cuttlefish? All sorts of
> names I've never tried.
>
> Anything I'm missing out on?
>
>
> I'd like to make a list for next time I visit.
>
> Thanks !


Have you tried the flat garlic chives? Great for dumpling filling...or
anything else, for that matter.

Have you tried making your own Thai curry paste? If they have fresh or
frozen galangal and lemon grass...the latter is common these days but
galangal can still be hard to come by. And if they have kaffir limes, by all
means buy some and freeze them. You can use ordinary lime rind in your curry
paste, though. Lots of great recipes use tamarind paste, but it sounds as if
you are probably familiar with that.


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On Jun 3, 7:57*am, mkr5000 > wrote:
> I like to hit my local Oriental grocery about once a month and I'm
> familiar with all of the
> 'standard" items like noodles, wrappers, soup broths, teas, chili
> sauce, dried shrimp etc.
>
> But, I was wondering if it might be interesting to start a post where
> others may suggest some things that
> maybe I've overlooked and should be a definite.... "you gotta try it".
> (Items you can't live without).


It's next to impossible to guess what you are familiar with and what
would be new for you. At the risk of offering nothing new, I'd put a
few things on the "essentials" list:

fermented black beans (Yang Jiang Preserved Bean, with or without
ginger)
Chinkiang black vinegar
ShaoXing rice wine (not cooking wine, no salt added, likely only
available if your Asian market can sell wine)
lop cheong sausages

> For example, they have a huge frozen section at my mart with all types
> of seafood, beef and pork cuts and
> I've never ventured into that section. *Cuttlefish? *All sorts of
> names I've never tried.


You might check out the frozen beef pizzle.... -aem



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On Jun 3, 7:57*am, mkr5000 > wrote:
> I like to hit my local Oriental grocery about once a month and I'm
> familiar with all of the
> 'standard" items like noodles, wrappers, soup broths, teas, chili
> sauce, dried shrimp etc.
>
> But, I was wondering if it might be interesting to start a post where
> others may suggest some things that
> maybe I've overlooked and should be a definite.... "you gotta try it".
> (Items you can't live without).
>
> I'm not talking about getting responses from native orientals so much
> because I can guarantee you stinky tofu and the like are not on my
> agenda.....but more interested in responses from those with more
> "Americanized" taste buds. (Although I'm a courageous eater -- not a
> wimp).
>
> For example, they have a huge frozen section at my mart with all types
> of seafood, beef and pork cuts and
> I've never ventured into that section. *Cuttlefish? *All sorts of
> names I've never tried.
>
> Anything I'm missing out on?
>
> I'd like to make a list for next time I visit.
>
> Thanks !


The store I go to, H-mart, has really nice produce, some of it I've
never heard of or seen before- that's a rather safe place to start.
Also, check the condiment aisle- lots of sauces to try.
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mkr5000 wrote:

> I'm not talking about getting responses from native orientals so much
> because I can guarantee you stinky tofu and the like are not on my
> agenda.....


Then you wouldn't like anything I would mention. Stick to lap chueng

> but more interested in responses from those with more
> "Americanized" taste buds. (Although I'm a courageous eater -- not a
> wimp).


Sounds like you're a wimp to me!

Get some mam nem, salted or preserved duck eggs, dried squid, or fermented
fish packed in oil then come back back and say that.

> Anything I'm missing out on?


Pretty much everything.

-sw
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Andy wrote:
> mkr5000 said...
>
>> I like to hit my local Oriental grocery about once a month and I'm
>> familiar with all of the
>> 'standard" items

>
>
> But you're obviously not familiar that they're Asian, not oriental grocery
> stores!??


They call themselves oriental grocers. Stop trying to be so PC. If it';s
good enough for them, it's good enough for the rest of us.

-sw
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jay wrote:

> Tofu products are actually on the lower end of the Oriental market stink
> scale. Maybe I'll come back with a serious *stink* list and you could just
> avoid all of that. One of the larger stores here that I went to just ONCE
> ..has the most GOD-awful putrid stench and it grabs you out in the parking
> lot. I mean my knees were buckling by the time I got to the front door. I
> like the Korean markets best.


That's what your neighbors say about your house, you slob.

-sw
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wrote:

> You might check out the frozen beef pizzle.... -aem


We get fresh uterus, pizzle, and bungs here in Austin.

-sw



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Merryb wrote:
> On Jun 3, 7:57 am, mkr5000 > wrote:
>> I like to hit my local Oriental grocery about once a month and I'm
>> familiar with all of the
>> 'standard" items like noodles, wrappers, soup broths, teas, chili
>> sauce, dried shrimp etc.
>>
>> But, I was wondering if it might be interesting to start a post where
>> others may suggest some things that
>> maybe I've overlooked and should be a definite.... "you gotta try it".
>> (Items you can't live without).
>>
>> I'm not talking about getting responses from native orientals so much
>> because I can guarantee you stinky tofu and the like are not on my
>> agenda.....but more interested in responses from those with more
>> "Americanized" taste buds. (Although I'm a courageous eater -- not a
>> wimp).
>>
>> For example, they have a huge frozen section at my mart with all types
>> of seafood, beef and pork cuts and
>> I've never ventured into that section. Cuttlefish? All sorts of
>> names I've never tried.
>>
>> Anything I'm missing out on?
>>
>> I'd like to make a list for next time I visit.
>>
>> Thanks !

>
> The store I go to, H-mart, has really nice produce, some of it I've
> never heard of or seen before- that's a rather safe place to start.
> Also, check the condiment aisle- lots of sauces to try.


I am anxiously awaiting the opening of an H-mart sort of near me.....15
miles or so away.
The opening date has not been announced but I think it will be very soon.

Tracy
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Andy wrote:
> mkr5000 said...
>
>> I like to hit my local Oriental grocery about once a month and I'm
>> familiar with all of the
>> 'standard" items

>
>
> But you're obviously not familiar that they're Asian, not oriental grocery
> stores!??
>
> Andy


What is the problem with the term Oriental? Many markets even
incorporate that into their name such as the "1st Oriental Supermarket"
written in large red letters on their large canopy on the store on 6th
and Washington in Philly.

http://www.phillychinatown.com/1stor...upermarket.htm
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Tracy wrote on Wed, 03 Jun 2009 13:11:06 -0400:

> Merryb wrote:
>> On Jun 3, 7:57 am, mkr5000 > wrote:
>>> I like to hit my local Oriental grocery about once a month
>>> and I'm familiar with all of the 'standard" items like
>>> noodles, wrappers, soup broths, teas, chili sauce, dried
>>> shrimp etc.
>>>


Things you might consider are dried mushrooms, dried chestnuts, miso,
soy sauce in large cans, fresh water chestnuts, good clear Thai fish
sauce (I like Golden Boy), dried soups (Knorr is good believe it not).
My favorite place is basically Chinese but it does not let ethic purity
stand in front of profits :-)

--

James Silverton
Potomac, Maryland

Email, with obvious alterations: not.jim.silverton.at.verizon.not

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Well, except for a few jerks with NOTHING to contribute, so far --

black vinegar, lop cheong sausages are on the list....everything else
I'm familiar with.

I know the basics -- like I say, lemongrass etc.


What is beef pizzle?


AND -- when I mentioned tofu, I was actually talking about the "stinky
tofu" as made famous
on bizzare foods.

Of course, I love the standard tofu.

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Anyone with experience in the frozen seafood section?

The names of many of the items are unfamiliar.


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George said...

> What is the problem with the term Oriental? Many markets even
> incorporate that into their name such as the "1st Oriental Supermarket"
> written in large red letters on their large canopy on the store on 6th
> and Washington in Philly.



George,

I was taught that it was a derogatory reference back in my teens. I never
used the term again.

Best,

Andy
--
Eat first, talk later.
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FYI --

The store I GO TO is called

A1 ORIENTAL mart

I'll give you their number so you can raise hell with them.
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Andy wrote on Wed, 03 Jun 2009 12:47:17 -0500:

>> What is the problem with the term Oriental? Many markets even
>> incorporate that into their name such as the "1st Oriental
>> Supermarket" written in large red letters on their large
>> canopy on the store on 6th and Washington in Philly.


> George,


> I was taught that it was a derogatory reference back in my
> teens. I never used the term again.


I've never seen anything wrong with "Oriental" as a synonym for "Far
Eastern" tho' there are some uses that I avoid like "Wog" (even that is
not too derogatory on the face of it.) There was a British nationalist
speculation about where wogs began: Calais was traditional.
--

James Silverton
Potomac, Maryland

Email, with obvious alterations: not.jim.silverton.at.verizon.not

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mkr5000 said...

> FYI --
>
> The store I GO TO is called
>
> A1 ORIENTAL mart
>
> I'll give you their number so you can raise hell with them.


You needn't bother, obnoxious jerk.
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James Silverton said...

> Andy wrote on Wed, 03 Jun 2009 12:47:17 -0500:
>
>>> What is the problem with the term Oriental? Many markets even
>>> incorporate that into their name such as the "1st Oriental
>>> Supermarket" written in large red letters on their large
>>> canopy on the store on 6th and Washington in Philly.

>
>> George,

>
>> I was taught that it was a derogatory reference back in my
>> teens. I never used the term again.

>
> I've never seen anything wrong with "Oriental" as a synonym for "Far
> Eastern" tho' there are some uses that I avoid like "Wog" (even that is
> not too derogatory on the face of it.) There was a British nationalist
> speculation about where wogs began: Calais was traditional.



James,

That's what I was taught. Maybe the term was popular at one time and fell out
of favor. I forget if and/or why. I just choose not to use it.

Best,

Andy
--
Eat first, talk later.


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mkr5000 wrote:
> Well, except for a few jerks with NOTHING to contribute, so far --
>
> black vinegar, lop cheong sausages are on the list....everything else
> I'm familiar with.
>
> I know the basics -- like I say, lemongrass etc.
>
>
> What is beef pizzle?
>
>
> AND -- when I mentioned tofu, I was actually talking about the "stinky
> tofu" as made famous
> on bizzare foods.
>
> Of course, I love the standard tofu.
>


Fried tofu is good too.

I am not very adventurous in the Asian grocery store. I buy curry paste,
fish sauce, chili sauces, other random sauces, dumpling wrappers, fresh
noodles, dry noodles and that's about it. There's probably a few other
items. Oh, those Japanese soft drinks with the marble. DS loves them ->
Ramune.

I buy some produce too like birds eye chiles and limes (they are ALWAYS
cheaper than the regular grocery) and the DH buys fresh fish. He doesn't
buy much frozen fish except for sardines (the big ones) which we get at
a Brazilian store. He can find skate and some other stuff. I don't know
exactly, since I don't eat fish.

I know, not much help, sorry.

Tracy

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On Jun 3, 10:47*am, Andy > wrote:
> George said...
>
> > What is the problem with the term Oriental? Many markets even
> > incorporate that into their name such as the "1st Oriental Supermarket"
> > written in large red letters on their large canopy on the store on 6th
> > and Washington in Philly.

>
> George,
>
> I was taught that it was a derogatory reference back in my teens. I never
> used the term again.
>

IMHO, that was somewhat of an overreaction by your teacher. If the UK/
Europe were the center of the world, then Asia would be to your east,
hence "oriental", and North America would be to your west, hence
"occidental." Nowadays people don't think of the UK as the center of
the world so the terms are inaccurate anachronisms. Not particularly
derogatory, just dumb. -aem
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In article >,
George > wrote:

> Andy wrote:
> > mkr5000 said...
> >
> >> I like to hit my local Oriental grocery about once a month and I'm
> >> familiar with all of the
> >> 'standard" items

> >
> >
> > But you're obviously not familiar that they're Asian, not oriental grocery
> > stores!??
> >
> > Andy

>
> What is the problem with the term Oriental? Many markets even
> incorporate that into their name such as the "1st Oriental Supermarket"
> written in large red letters on their large canopy on the store on 6th
> and Washington in Philly.
>
> http://www.phillychinatown.com/1stor...upermarket.htm


I looked it up. The adjective is dated, the noun is both dated and
sometimes offensive.

--
Dan Abel
Petaluma, California USA

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George wrote:
> Andy wrote:
>> mkr5000 said...
>>
>>> I like to hit my local Oriental grocery about once a month and I'm
>>> familiar with all of the
>>> 'standard" items

>>
>>
>> But you're obviously not familiar that they're Asian, not oriental
>> grocery stores!??


> What is the problem with the term Oriental? Many markets even
> incorporate that into their name such as the "1st Oriental
> Supermarket" written in large red letters on their large canopy on
> the store on 6th and Washington in Philly.


I guess if they were selling people, it might be an Asian
market. Asians are people. The Orient refers to the area of
the world.

nancy
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mkr5000 > wrote:
>
> I like to hit my local Oriental grocery about once a month ...
>
> Cuttlefish?


It's a mollusc so if you like clams, oysters, scallops, calimari
you'll love it. It's a close relative to calimari. Wonderful
sauteed.

I'll be the third poster so far to mention the sausages. To that
I'll add the Chinese style bacon. Plus pretty much any other
type of processed pork stuff. It may not look familiar but it
will be good.

If they have BBQ ducks and/or pressed ducks, put them near
the top of your list along with the sausages. We go the the
local Chinatown in Chicago a couple times per year for BBQ
duck, BBQ ribs and cha-shu-bao then we continue shopping
at other shops for the other items I discuss.

Chinese ethnic places generally have fresh meat from assorted
animals that's great. Types of fish whose name I don't know,
cook them like types of fish whose name I do know. Breeds of
chicken that look slightly different than the breeds I know, cook
them like chicken because that's what they are. Other types
of bird, parts of cow/pig/lamb that aren't cut the same as I'm
used to, cook them anyways. There was one place in the Los
Angeles Chinatown that usually had live turtles - I never did get
around to buying one then figuring out how to cook it. But if it's
an animal it's made of meat so it's going to be good.

They are likely to have all sorts of veggies. Most people like
most types of veggies, so what's the down side to trying a few?
If you don't like one type, toss it and move on to the next.

I like roasted sesame oil. It's dark brown and a few drops go a
long way. I get a pint jar and it lasts me 2-3 years. I also like
Chinese style soy sauces. They aren't all that different from the
Japanese style ones, but a little bit different is often a good thing.

If they have a Japanese section they are likely to have dessert
looking pastel colored spheres or cylinders that look like a soft
candy. They are usually made from rice flour so they are more
rich than sweet and they often have fillings of bean paste or
whatever that's also more rich than sweet. Softer texture than
gummy bear, lighter than marzipan.

If they have an herbalist section with hundreds of jars of dried
stuff, let your nose and imagination run wild. Buy this that and
the other one of items that smell good to you. Start out trying
them in a broth or to flavor a sautee. Buy more of what you
like, not of what you didn't. There's a lot more there than just
dried mushrooms, shrimp, ginger and ginsing.

Tea. Try a few types. Canned stuff. Go by the pictures. So
many varieties of rice there's got to be a difference. Being
wheat intollerant I go for the rice noodles. Some places that
stock Japanese style buckwheat noodles have some that are
wheat-free (I have found that more often in Whole Foods or
Wild Oats, but I read the labels just in case).

If they have Thai items, lemon grass, coconut milk.

Do you already have a hammered wok, a cermanic steaming
kettle, a cleaver knife, a steaming rice cooker? Get them there.


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On Jun 3, 9:57*am, mkr5000 > wrote:
> I like to hit my local Oriental grocery about once a month and I'm
> familiar with all of the
> 'standard" items like noodles, wrappers, soup broths, teas, chili
> sauce, dried shrimp etc.
>
> But, I was wondering if it might be interesting to start a post where
> others may suggest some things that
> maybe I've overlooked and should be a definite.... "you gotta try it".
> (Items you can't live without).
>
> I'm not talking about getting responses from native orientals so much
> because I can guarantee you stinky tofu and the like are not on my
> agenda.....but more interested in responses from those with more
> "Americanized" taste buds. (Although I'm a courageous eater -- not a
> wimp).
>
> For example, they have a huge frozen section at my mart with all types
> of seafood, beef and pork cuts and
> I've never ventured into that section. *Cuttlefish? *All sorts of
> names I've never tried.
>
> Anything I'm missing out on?
>
> I'd like to make a list for next time I visit.
>
> Thanks !


Today I bought chicken feet and duck wings. I'm frying up the feet
right now.

--Bryan
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On Jun 3, 10:11*am, Tracy > wrote:
> Merryb wrote:
> > On Jun 3, 7:57 am, mkr5000 > wrote:
> >> I like to hit my local Oriental grocery about once a month and I'm
> >> familiar with all of the
> >> 'standard" items like noodles, wrappers, soup broths, teas, chili
> >> sauce, dried shrimp etc.

>
> >> But, I was wondering if it might be interesting to start a post where
> >> others may suggest some things that
> >> maybe I've overlooked and should be a definite.... "you gotta try it".
> >> (Items you can't live without).

>
> >> I'm not talking about getting responses from native orientals so much
> >> because I can guarantee you stinky tofu and the like are not on my
> >> agenda.....but more interested in responses from those with more
> >> "Americanized" taste buds. (Although I'm a courageous eater -- not a
> >> wimp).

>
> >> For example, they have a huge frozen section at my mart with all types
> >> of seafood, beef and pork cuts and
> >> I've never ventured into that section. *Cuttlefish? *All sorts of
> >> names I've never tried.

>
> >> Anything I'm missing out on?

>
> >> I'd like to make a list for next time I visit.

>
> >> Thanks !

>
> > The store I go to, H-mart, has really nice produce, some of it I've
> > never heard of or seen before- that's a rather safe place to start.
> > Also, check the condiment aisle- lots of sauces to try.

>
> I am anxiously awaiting the opening of an H-mart sort of near me.....15
> miles or so away.
> The opening date has not been announced but I think it will be very soon.
>
> Tracy- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -


I think you will like it! Their seafood is beautiful and really fresh
looking. One of the things I buy there on occasion is beef tenderloin-
the whole thing. It's vacuum packed, but the only downside (if you can
call it that) is you have to cut off the silvery membrane. Not a big
deal to do, and for $5.99 a # for filet mignons it's well worth it.
You can always cook it whole and slice after. I'm happy for you!
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On Jun 3, 12:48*pm, Sqwertz > wrote:
> wrote:
> > You might check out the frozen beef pizzle.... * *-aem

>
> We get fresh uterus, pizzle, and bungs here in Austin.
>
> -sw


On my last visit to one of our local stores (Eastern, Oriental, Asian,
whatever) the meat counter was offering cow's balls among their
delicacies. Sounds like an oxymoron to me.

No, I didn't invest, but they had some great lookiing ox tails in an
adjacent tray whicj I will try in the fall season when heavy duty
soups are again in order.

Ribitt
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Sqwertz wrote:

> We get fresh uterus, pizzle, and bungs here in Austin.



Jeez, is that the *best* you can say about your girlfriends, Steve...???


--
Best
Greg


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Andy wrote:
> mkr5000 said...
>
>> I like to hit my local Oriental grocery about once a month and I'm
>> familiar with all of the
>> 'standard" items

>
>
> But you're obviously not familiar that they're Asian, not oriental grocery
> stores!??
>
> Andy



Not according to the sign out front. Most of them say "Oriental Market"
HTH

Bob


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Doug Freyburger wrote:
> mkr5000 > wrote:
>
>>I like to hit my local Oriental grocery about once a month ...
>>
>>Cuttlefish?

>
>
> It's a mollusc so if you like clams, oysters, scallops, calimari
> you'll love it. It's a close relative to calimari. Wonderful
> sauteed.
>
> I'll be the third poster so far to mention the sausages. To that
> I'll add the Chinese style bacon. Plus pretty much any other
> type of processed pork stuff. It may not look familiar but it
> will be good.


Anybody mention the dried black mushrooms?

I keep meaning to try them but have not got around to it yet.

I do keep a bottle of Pat Chun Garlic Chili Sauce on hand and what is
called Banana sauce, and every once in a while buy some eschallots
frites, a small jar of a Vietnamese product that are fried, diced
shallots, they go very nice as a garnish for a hot soup or scattered on
a green salad.

The Asian shopping area i occasionally bore people here with my boastful
ranting about has lots of mushrooms for sale, way more dried than fresh
but even then lots of fresh that i have no idea about.

I was recently turned on to a hugh mushroom that's almost all stem, one
way of using is to scoop or carve out a hollow in the really big thick
stem (4 to 6 inches long 3 - 4 wide), use the mushroom flesh you have
removed to make a stuffing with, ground chicken & shrimp is good, herbs
& spices & etc. stuff the mushroom stem shell and bake.

Its a type of common mushroom specially cultivated for the stem, just
wish i could remember its common name ....
--
Joseph Littleshoes Esq.
Domine, dirige nos.
Let the games begin!
http://www.dancingmice.net/Karn%20Evil%209.mp3

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Andy wrote:

>> I like to hit my local Oriental grocery about once a month and I'm
>> familiar with all of the 'standard" items

>
>
> But you're obviously not familiar that they're Asian, not oriental grocery
> stores!??


So they have wares from India, Iran, Kyrgyzstan, Saudi Arabia, and Turkey?
Or are they not THAT Asian, only the Oriental kind of Asian?

Bob



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zxcvbob said...

> Andy wrote:
>> mkr5000 said...
>>
>>> I like to hit my local Oriental grocery about once a month and I'm
>>> familiar with all of the
>>> 'standard" items

>>
>>
>> But you're obviously not familiar that they're Asian, not oriental
>> grocery stores!??
>>
>> Andy

>
>
> Not according to the sign out front. Most of them say "Oriental Market"
> HTH
>
> Bob



In your small corner of the world, maybe.

Andy
--
Eat first, talk later.
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Many thanks for the great suggestions so far.

I'll try the cuttlefish -- have seen oxtails which you sure can't get
at Kroger.

Chicken feet -- gotta try those, I'm sure she'll have them. Chinese
bacon? new one on me.

Still would like to know what beef pizzle is. ?

Putting together a nice list.
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mkr5000 wrote:
> I like to hit my local Oriental grocery about once a month and I'm
> familiar with all of the
> 'standard" items like noodles, wrappers, soup broths, teas, chili
> sauce, dried shrimp etc.
>
> But, I was wondering if it might be interesting to start a post where
> others may suggest some things that
> maybe I've overlooked and should be a definite.... "you gotta try it".
> (Items you can't live without).
>
> I'm not talking about getting responses from native orientals so much
> because I can guarantee you stinky tofu and the like are not on my
> agenda.....but more interested in responses from those with more
> "Americanized" taste buds. (Although I'm a courageous eater -- not a
> wimp).
>
> For example, they have a huge frozen section at my mart with all types
> of seafood, beef and pork cuts and
> I've never ventured into that section. Cuttlefish? All sorts of
> names I've never tried.
>
> Anything I'm missing out on?
>


I make a point of going to an oriental store every month or two to stock
up on curry paste, coconut milk, noodles, hot sauces etc. Any oriental,
Asian or West Indian goods that are avilable in the grocery store are
usually much cheaper. Once in a while they have nice mangoes, perfectly
ripe, and for less than half the price of the unripe and never to be
properly ripe mangoes in the grocery store.


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zxcvbob wrote:
> Andy wrote:
>> mkr5000 said...
>>
>>> I like to hit my local Oriental grocery about once a month and I'm
>>> familiar with all of the
>>> 'standard" items

>>
>>
>> But you're obviously not familiar that they're Asian, not oriental
>> grocery stores!??
>>
>> Andy

>
>
> Not according to the sign out front. Most of them say "Oriental Market"



The one I go to is called Oriental Supermarket. It sells Chinese,
Indian, Thai, South American and West Indian products.
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Did a search on beef pizzle.

Now I get it.

Sort of like the Cartman fish sticks joke.

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"mkr5000" wrote

>I like to hit my local Oriental grocery about once a month and I'm
> familiar with all of the
> 'standard" items like noodles, wrappers, soup broths, teas, chili
> sauce, dried shrimp etc.


Ok, Mine's called the American Asian grocery and stocks many things.

> But, I was wondering if it might be interesting to start a post where
> others may suggest some things that
> maybe I've overlooked and should be a definite.... "you gotta try it".
> (Items you can't live without).


I go about every 2 weeks. I'd go more often but it's not on my path home
from work.

I looked over the messages before posting this one. If they have a prepared
food section, try the duck! Expect bones in some of the portions as thats
how it is done.

Check the Philippene sausage types. They are different but will taste
translate well.

Datu Puti brand vinegars and soys. Good stuff.

I get most of my fresh green veggies there. Also look for a type of
mushroom that is a bit like a head of cauliflower all growing from one bed
'bunch' (shemenji in enlish rendering- google will show a picture).

The fish types in the fresh stall may be unfamiliar but you can ask and get
an idea of them. Frozen, one of the greats is called 'bangus' (english,
milk-fish).

That American football shaped item (apt to be a bit bigger than our actual
ones) with spikes is calls a 'durian'. It's a love or hate thing like
liver. Let it ripen on the porch til it looks like it wants to split open
then use a hammer and knife. You can also get frozen parts of the cleaned
fruit. It is much like a custard in consistancy, tastes devine, and smells
a bit like an open sewer. (the OP who ran out of an asian grocery, probably
smelled ripe durian for sale).

Watch for eggs that are dyed. They are probably balut. This can be duck or
chicken but apt to be chicken in the USA. It contains a small 'bird' that
was pre-hatching, usually just before pinions (feathers) develop. I love
them but they can be unsettling to the unwary.

Since I eat largely asian after 6.5 years there, this subject is too big for
me to cover. I just hit a few highlights.


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On Jun 3, 7:06*pm, "cshenk" > wrote:
>
>
> Watch for eggs that are dyed. *They are probably balut. *This can be duck or
> chicken but apt to be chicken in the USA. *It contains a small 'bird' that
> was pre-hatching, usually just before pinions (feathers) develop. *I love
> them but they can be unsettling to the unwary.
>

I have an old buddy who used to work in an egg processing plant. He
won't eat eggs. He used to call them, "Chicken abortions." The eggs
you described really are.

--Bryan
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mkr5000 > writes:


> Anything I'm missing out on?
>
>
> I'd like to make a list for next time I visit.



TONS!!

shrimp chips
coconut milk
frozen coconut cream
canned drinks (papaya, mango, etc)
fresh drinks (pennywort, fresh soy milk (nothing like it))
Thai curry paste (to go w/ the coconut milk/cream)
fresh pork (best price in town!)
sashimi
fresh mung/soy sprouts
fresh fish*
prepared peking duck or bbq pork
Chinese rice wine
fish sauce
frozen lumpia
Asian pears
Kim chee
1000000 yr eggs
Smithfield hams
sake
instant dashi
miso
rice
cookware
smoked eel (unagi?).......


Holy crap, I could go on forever. If I miss one thing from SFBA, it's
the Asian markets. Get a couple asian cookbooks and start
experimenting. If I had only one choice to shop for food....

* Approach the fresh fish warily. I only tried 'em once and it was
catastrophic. I bought two live dungeness crabs and cooked 'em
myself, thinking "live" would be safe. After eating the crab, I had
a severe full body rash and the green apple shouts for a week!!
Never had this reaction buying pre-cooked (frozen) or live off
fishing boats. Always wondered if it was due to contaminated live
tanks at market. It was my only bad experience with Asian markets.

nb
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