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Old 12-07-2013, 02:24 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Default Opinion piece on artificial sweeteners

Hi All,

Here is a great opinion piece on artificial sweeteners
from a journal called:

Trends in Endocrinology and Metabolism
http://www.cell.com/trends/endocrinology-metabolism/

http://download.cell.com/images/edim...sm/tem_888.pdf

A quick summary: artificial sweeteners initially trick the
body into reacting as if something sweet is entering. Then
the body gets wise to the trick and stops. Then when you
do eat something sweet or carbie, the body doesn't react
properly. And the satiation response doesn't kick in,
causing overeating and T2 to kick in.

Basically, the criticism of artificial sweeteners is
that body gets wise to them and doesn't react appropriately
to the real stuff. Not that the body thinks the fake stuff
is real, but that the body starts to think the real stuff
is fake.

-T

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Old 12-07-2013, 03:12 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Default Opinion piece on artificial sweeteners

On 7/11/2013 8:24 PM, Todd wrote:
Hi All,

Here is a great opinion piece on artificial sweeteners
from a journal called:

Trends in Endocrinology and Metabolism
http://www.cell.com/trends/endocrinology-metabolism/

http://download.cell.com/images/edim...sm/tem_888.pdf

A quick summary: artificial sweeteners initially trick the
body into reacting as if something sweet is entering. Then
the body gets wise to the trick and stops. Then when you
do eat something sweet or carbie, the body doesn't react
properly. And the satiation response doesn't kick in,
causing overeating and T2 to kick in.

Basically, the criticism of artificial sweeteners is
that body gets wise to them and doesn't react appropriately
to the real stuff. Not that the body thinks the fake stuff
is real, but that the body starts to think the real stuff
is fake.

-T


I dislike sugar sweetened beverages. No sweeteners in my coffee or tea.
Hate sugared sodas and punches. Sugar sets my teeth on edge.

I have been drinking diet soda since I was a teenager. That's over half
a century. Went through all the different types of sweeteners that were
on or off the market. I down between 3 and 5 cans of Coke Zero a day and
have been for years. Before Coke Zero it was Diet Coke. Before that it
was Tab.

According to that article, I should be a T2 by now, but my BG is perfect
and and I am not overweight.

My thyroid condition is from radiation side effects. Otherwise my
metabolism is in good working order despite all that diet soda.

--
Janet Wilder
Way-the-heck-south Texas
Spelling doesn't count. Cooking does.
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Old 12-07-2013, 03:20 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Default Opinion piece on artificial sweeteners

On 07/11/2013 07:12 PM, Janet Wilder wrote:
On 7/11/2013 8:24 PM, Todd wrote:
Hi All,

Here is a great opinion piece on artificial sweeteners
from a journal called:

Trends in Endocrinology and Metabolism
http://www.cell.com/trends/endocrinology-metabolism/

http://download.cell.com/images/edim...sm/tem_888.pdf


A quick summary: artificial sweeteners initially trick the
body into reacting as if something sweet is entering. Then
the body gets wise to the trick and stops. Then when you
do eat something sweet or carbie, the body doesn't react
properly. And the satiation response doesn't kick in,
causing overeating and T2 to kick in.

Basically, the criticism of artificial sweeteners is
that body gets wise to them and doesn't react appropriately
to the real stuff. Not that the body thinks the fake stuff
is real, but that the body starts to think the real stuff
is fake.

-T


I dislike sugar sweetened beverages. No sweeteners in my coffee or tea.
Hate sugared sodas and punches. Sugar sets my teeth on edge.

I have been drinking diet soda since I was a teenager. That's over half
a century. Went through all the different types of sweeteners that were
on or off the market. I down between 3 and 5 cans of Coke Zero a day and
have been for years. Before Coke Zero it was Diet Coke. Before that it
was Tab.

According to that article, I should be a T2 by now, but my BG is perfect
and and I am not overweight.

My thyroid condition is from radiation side effects. Otherwise my
metabolism is in good working order despite all that diet soda.


Hi Janet,

That is why it is called an "opinion piece". A very
"learned" opinion piece, but still an opinion piece.

The idea was to let folks know why artificial sweeteners
are "suspect". The guy still has to prove his assertions.

Mainly, I wanted folks to know that the "assertion" was
that the body started to think that real stuff wasn't.

-T
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Old 12-07-2013, 03:58 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Default Opinion piece on artificial sweeteners

Todd wrote:
: Hi All,

: Here is a great opinion piece on artificial sweeteners
: from a journal called:

: Trends in Endocrinology and Metabolism
: http://www.cell.com/trends/endocrinology-metabolism/

: http://download.cell.com/images/edim...sm/tem_888.pdf

: A quick summary: artificial sweeteners initially trick the
: body into reacting as if something sweet is entering. Then
: the body gets wise to the trick and stops. Then when you
: do eat something sweet or carbie, the body doesn't react
: properly. And the satiation response doesn't kick in,
: causing overeating and T2 to kick in.

: Basically, the criticism of artificial sweeteners is
: that body gets wise to them and doesn't react appropriately
: to the real stuff. Not that the body thinks the fake stuff
: is real, but that the body starts to think the real stuff
: is fake.

: -T

I didn't read it, for various vision reasons, bu does Stevia do or not do
the same thing of tricking the body into thinking it is getting sugar,
etc? It most liekly is the sweetmess pf tehtaste that is the problem, not
its artificiality . the Stevia is also an artificial sugar as it is
someting pretending to be a sugar that is not(no calories, no carbs) so if
the non-nutritive(better word for the general catgory) sweetener fools the
body into thinking it is gettign sugar, thusr eleasing insuin, etc, then
Stevia is just as guilty.

Wendy


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Old 12-07-2013, 04:17 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Default Opinion piece on artificial sweeteners

On 07/11/2013 07:58 PM, W. Baker wrote:
Todd wrote:
: Hi All,

: Here is a great opinion piece on artificial sweeteners
: from a journal called:

: Trends in Endocrinology and Metabolism
: http://www.cell.com/trends/endocrinology-metabolism/

: http://download.cell.com/images/edim...sm/tem_888.pdf

: A quick summary: artificial sweeteners initially trick the
: body into reacting as if something sweet is entering. Then
: the body gets wise to the trick and stops. Then when you
: do eat something sweet or carbie, the body doesn't react
: properly. And the satiation response doesn't kick in,
: causing overeating and T2 to kick in.

: Basically, the criticism of artificial sweeteners is
: that body gets wise to them and doesn't react appropriately
: to the real stuff. Not that the body thinks the fake stuff
: is real, but that the body starts to think the real stuff
: is fake.

: -T

I didn't read it, for various vision reasons, bu does Stevia do or not do
the same thing of tricking the body into thinking it is getting sugar,
etc? It most liekly is the sweetmess pf tehtaste that is the problem, not
its artificiality . the Stevia is also an artificial sugar as it is
someting pretending to be a sugar that is not(no calories, no carbs) so if
the non-nutritive(better word for the general catgory) sweetener fools the
body into thinking it is gettign sugar, thusr eleasing insuin, etc, then
Stevia is just as guilty.

Wendy


Hi Wendy,

I have read in several places that Stevia did trigger
inappropriately. But, the sources did not reference
their statements, so ...

"Apparently" (note the weasel word), stevia is seen
as just another food by the body.

Here is an nice article on stevia (which does "not"
answer your question):

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stevia

-T



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Old 12-07-2013, 03:28 PM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Default Opinion piece on artificial sweeteners

On Fri, 12 Jul 2013 02:58:13 +0000 (UTC)
"W. Baker" wrote:

Todd wrote:
: Hi All,

: Here is a great opinion piece on artificial sweeteners
: from a journal called:

: Trends in Endocrinology and Metabolism
: http://www.cell.com/trends/endocrinology-metabolism/

:
http://download.cell.com/images/edim...sm/tem_888.pdf

: A quick summary: artificial sweeteners initially trick the
: body into reacting as if something sweet is entering. Then
: the body gets wise to the trick and stops. Then when you
: do eat something sweet or carbie, the body doesn't react
: properly. And the satiation response doesn't kick in,
: causing overeating and T2 to kick in.

: Basically, the criticism of artificial sweeteners is
: that body gets wise to them and doesn't react appropriately
: to the real stuff. Not that the body thinks the fake stuff
: is real, but that the body starts to think the real stuff
: is fake.

: -T

I didn't read it, for various vision reasons, bu does Stevia do or
not do the same thing of tricking the body into thinking it is
getting sugar, etc? It most liekly is the sweetmess pf tehtaste that
is the problem, not its artificiality . the Stevia is also an
artificial sugar as it is someting pretending to be a sugar that is
not(no calories, no carbs) so if the non-nutritive(better word for
the general catgory) sweetener fools the body into thinking it is
gettign sugar, thusr eleasing insuin, etc, then Stevia is just as
guilty.

Wendy


I think that is probably right. Think about fructose. It is the
sweetest of the common sugars, but it provides no rush of glucose
into the blood. Instead it must be processed by the liver where
it generally ends up as fat. So we get an insulin response from
fructose, but no matching increase in glucose. Some people develop
hypos from this, and many more have to be careful about the
liver fat.


--
I'm Trawley Trash, and you haven't heard the last of me yet.

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Old 12-07-2013, 07:02 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Todd View Post
On 07/11/2013 07:58 PM, W. Baker wrote:
Todd lid wrote:
: Hi All,

: Here is a great opinion piece on artificial sweeteners
: from a journal called:

: Trends in Endocrinology and Metabolism
:
Trends in Endocrinology & Metabolism

: http://download.cell.com/images/edim...sm/tem_888.pdf

: A quick summary: artificial sweeteners initially trick the
: body into reacting as if something sweet is entering. Then
: the body gets wise to the trick and stops. Then when you
: do eat something sweet or carbie, the body doesn't react
: properly. And the satiation response doesn't kick in,
: causing overeating and T2 to kick in.

: Basically, the criticism of artificial sweeteners is
: that body gets wise to them and doesn't react appropriately
: to the real stuff. Not that the body thinks the fake stuff
: is real, but that the body starts to think the real stuff
: is fake.

: -T

I didn't read it, for various vision reasons, bu does Stevia do or not do
the same thing of tricking the body into thinking it is getting sugar,
etc? It most liekly is the sweetmess pf tehtaste that is the problem, not
its artificiality . the Stevia is also an artificial sugar as it is
someting pretending to be a sugar that is not(no calories, no carbs) so if
the non-nutritive(better word for the general catgory) sweetener fools the
body into thinking it is gettign sugar, thusr eleasing insuin, etc, then
Stevia is just as guilty.

Wendy


Hi Wendy,

I have read in several places that Stevia did trigger
inappropriately. But, the sources did not reference
their statements, so ...

"Apparently" (note the weasel word), stevia is seen
as just another food by the body.

Here is an nice article on stevia (which does "not"
answer your question):

Stevia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

-T
This our health guru named Dr. Richard Becker. He ranks all artificial sweeteners in the same class as high fructose corn syrup..hydrogenated vegetable oils..sugar and MSG as being highly detrimental to good health. This is one of his spiels on anti oxidants but he also does a great hatchet job on the artificial sweeteners. Try to watch his TV show if you get a chance.
Dr. Becker Lists Antioxidant Sources - Your Health TV - YouTube
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Old 12-07-2013, 11:05 PM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Default Opinion piece on artificial sweeteners

On 07/12/2013 11:02 AM, bigwheel wrote:
This our health guru named Dr. Richard Becker. He ranks all artificial
sweeteners in the same class as high fructose corn syrup..hydrogenated
vegetable oils..sugar and MSG as being highly detrimental to good
health. This is one of his spiels on anti oxidants but he also does a
great hatchet job on the artificial sweeteners. Try to watch his TV show
if you get a chance.
'Dr. Becker Lists Antioxidant Sources - Your Health TV - YouTube'
(http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-LiifoVzSf0)


Thank you!

I do love my colored vegi's. If you buy your eggplant
before its gets too big, you can eat the skins too.
Lots of vits in the skin.

-T
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Old 15-07-2013, 01:17 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Default Opinion piece on artificial sweeteners

On 07/12/2013 07:28 AM, Trawley Trash wrote:
On Fri, 12 Jul 2013 02:58:13 +0000 (UTC)
"W. Baker" wrote:

Todd wrote:
: Hi All,

: Here is a great opinion piece on artificial sweeteners
: from a journal called:

: Trends in Endocrinology and Metabolism
: http://www.cell.com/trends/endocrinology-metabolism/

:
http://download.cell.com/images/edim...sm/tem_888.pdf

: A quick summary: artificial sweeteners initially trick the
: body into reacting as if something sweet is entering. Then
: the body gets wise to the trick and stops. Then when you
: do eat something sweet or carbie, the body doesn't react
: properly. And the satiation response doesn't kick in,
: causing overeating and T2 to kick in.

: Basically, the criticism of artificial sweeteners is
: that body gets wise to them and doesn't react appropriately
: to the real stuff. Not that the body thinks the fake stuff
: is real, but that the body starts to think the real stuff
: is fake.

: -T

I didn't read it, for various vision reasons, bu does Stevia do or
not do the same thing of tricking the body into thinking it is
getting sugar, etc? It most liekly is the sweetmess pf tehtaste that
is the problem, not its artificiality . the Stevia is also an
artificial sugar as it is someting pretending to be a sugar that is
not(no calories, no carbs) so if the non-nutritive(better word for
the general catgory) sweetener fools the body into thinking it is
gettign sugar, thusr eleasing insuin, etc, then Stevia is just as
guilty.

Wendy


I think that is probably right. Think about fructose. It is the
sweetest of the common sugars, but it provides no rush of glucose
into the blood. Instead it must be processed by the liver where
it generally ends up as fat. So we get an insulin response from
fructose, but no matching increase in glucose. Some people develop
hypos from this, and many more have to be careful about the
liver fat.


Here is a chart that shows glucose and fructose metabolism
and how they interact. (They interact A LOT!)

http://www.nutritionandmetabolism.co...1/89/figure/F1



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Old 15-07-2013, 04:38 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Default Opinion piece on artificial sweeteners

On Sun, 14 Jul 2013 17:17:32 -0700
Todd wrote:

On 07/12/2013 07:28 AM, Trawley Trash wrote:
On Fri, 12 Jul 2013 02:58:13 +0000 (UTC)
"W. Baker" wrote:

Todd wrote:
: Hi All,

: Here is a great opinion piece on artificial sweeteners
: from a journal called:

: Trends in Endocrinology and Metabolism
: http://www.cell.com/trends/endocrinology-metabolism/

:
http://download.cell.com/images/edim...sm/tem_888.pdf

: A quick summary: artificial sweeteners initially trick the
: body into reacting as if something sweet is entering. Then
: the body gets wise to the trick and stops. Then when you
: do eat something sweet or carbie, the body doesn't react
: properly. And the satiation response doesn't kick in,
: causing overeating and T2 to kick in.

: Basically, the criticism of artificial sweeteners is
: that body gets wise to them and doesn't react appropriately
: to the real stuff. Not that the body thinks the fake stuff
: is real, but that the body starts to think the real stuff
: is fake.

: -T

I didn't read it, for various vision reasons, bu does Stevia do or
not do the same thing of tricking the body into thinking it is
getting sugar, etc? It most liekly is the sweetmess pf tehtaste
that is the problem, not its artificiality . the Stevia is also an
artificial sugar as it is someting pretending to be a sugar that is
not(no calories, no carbs) so if the non-nutritive(better word for
the general catgory) sweetener fools the body into thinking it is
gettign sugar, thusr eleasing insuin, etc, then Stevia is just as
guilty.

Wendy


I think that is probably right. Think about fructose. It is the
sweetest of the common sugars, but it provides no rush of glucose
into the blood. Instead it must be processed by the liver where
it generally ends up as fat. So we get an insulin response from
fructose, but no matching increase in glucose. Some people
develop hypos from this, and many more have to be careful about the
liver fat.


Here is a chart that shows glucose and fructose metabolism
and how they interact. (They interact A LOT!)

http://www.nutritionandmetabolism.co...1/89/figure/F1


Yup. That is the sort of thing I am trying to make sense of.
Similar charts in wikipedia under "fructose_metabolism" and
"glucose_metabolism". Notice that fructose and glucose both
connect directly to "extrahepatic metabolism". That means
they are used directly outside the liver. What this doesn't
say is that fructose is used by the testes in making sperm.
Glucose powers everything else. The dotted line from fructose
over toward glycogen is only active when the liver needs to
make more glycogen. So most of the fructose ends up as
lipoprotein (VLDL) before it is sent back into the blood.
These are blobs of fat. Some of the fructose does end up
in the glucose pathway converted into pyruvate and powering
the Krebs cycle, but this is all going on inside the liver.
Most glucose is never absorbed by the liver, but is directly
metabolized elsewhere.



--
I'm Trawley Trash, and you haven't heard the last of me yet.



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Old 15-07-2013, 06:51 PM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Default Opinion piece on artificial sweeteners

On Sun, 14 Jul 2013 17:17:32 -0700
Todd wrote:

Here is a chart that shows glucose and fructose metabolism
and how they interact. (They interact A LOT!)

http://www.nutritionandmetabolism.co...1/89/figure/F1


I've already commented once on this chart, but I'd like to
add some context.

The chart shows interactions of glucose and fructose inside
the liver only. Probably there is some text that goes along
with it that would make this clear. The metabolism inside
the muscles, the brain, the reproductive organs, the pancreas
and other organs is different. A complete chart would be
at least ten times as complicated. There really should be
a circle around the central parts showing which reactions
take place in the liver. Galactose is another important
sugar metabolized by the liver that is completely missing
here.

Each of those arrows represents the action of an enzyme
listed in the caption underneath. These enzymes are
specified in our DNA, and their expression can also
be switched on and off by environmental factors. There
are hundreds of these enzymes that vary between individuals.
So each of us metabolizes sugars in a slightly different
way.

--
I'm Trawley Trash, and you haven't heard the last of me yet.

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Old 15-07-2013, 07:09 PM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Default Opinion piece on artificial sweeteners

In article ,
Trawley Trash wrote:

On Sun, 14 Jul 2013 17:17:32 -0700
Todd wrote:

On 07/12/2013 07:28 AM, Trawley Trash wrote:
On Fri, 12 Jul 2013 02:58:13 +0000 (UTC)
"W. Baker" wrote:

Todd wrote:
: Hi All,

: Here is a great opinion piece on artificial sweeteners
: from a journal called:

: Trends in Endocrinology and Metabolism
: http://www.cell.com/trends/endocrinology-metabolism/

:
http://download.cell.com/images/edim...ism/tem_888.pd
f

: A quick summary: artificial sweeteners initially trick the
: body into reacting as if something sweet is entering. Then
: the body gets wise to the trick and stops. Then when you
: do eat something sweet or carbie, the body doesn't react
: properly. And the satiation response doesn't kick in,
: causing overeating and T2 to kick in.

: Basically, the criticism of artificial sweeteners is
: that body gets wise to them and doesn't react appropriately
: to the real stuff. Not that the body thinks the fake stuff
: is real, but that the body starts to think the real stuff
: is fake.

: -T

I didn't read it, for various vision reasons, bu does Stevia do or
not do the same thing of tricking the body into thinking it is
getting sugar, etc? It most liekly is the sweetmess pf tehtaste
that is the problem, not its artificiality . the Stevia is also an
artificial sugar as it is someting pretending to be a sugar that is
not(no calories, no carbs) so if the non-nutritive(better word for
the general catgory) sweetener fools the body into thinking it is
gettign sugar, thusr eleasing insuin, etc, then Stevia is just as
guilty.

Wendy

I think that is probably right. Think about fructose. It is the
sweetest of the common sugars, but it provides no rush of glucose
into the blood. Instead it must be processed by the liver where
it generally ends up as fat. So we get an insulin response from
fructose, but no matching increase in glucose. Some people
develop hypos from this, and many more have to be careful about the
liver fat.


Here is a chart that shows glucose and fructose metabolism
and how they interact. (They interact A LOT!)

http://www.nutritionandmetabolism.co...1/89/figure/F1


Yup. That is the sort of thing I am trying to make sense of.
Similar charts in wikipedia under "fructose_metabolism" and
"glucose_metabolism". Notice that fructose and glucose both
connect directly to "extrahepatic metabolism". That means
they are used directly outside the liver. What this doesn't
say is that fructose is used by the testes in making sperm.
Glucose powers everything else. The dotted line from fructose
over toward glycogen is only active when the liver needs to
make more glycogen. So most of the fructose ends up as
lipoprotein (VLDL) before it is sent back into the blood.
These are blobs of fat. Some of the fructose does end up
in the glucose pathway converted into pyruvate and powering
the Krebs cycle, but this is all going on inside the liver.
Most glucose is never absorbed by the liver, but is directly
metabolized elsewhere.


VLDL correlates more closely to CVD than does LDL.
--
Palestinian Child Detained
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zzSzH38jYcg

Remember Rachel Corrie
http://www.rachelcorrie.org/

Welcome to the New America.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hA736oK9FPg
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Old 15-07-2013, 10:21 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Todd View Post
On 07/12/2013 11:02 AM, bigwheel wrote:
This our health guru named Dr. Richard Becker. He ranks all artificial
sweeteners in the same class as high fructose corn syrup..hydrogenated
vegetable oils..sugar and MSG as being highly detrimental to good
health. This is one of his spiels on anti oxidants but he also does a
great hatchet job on the artificial sweeteners. Try to watch his TV show
if you get a chance.
'Dr. Becker Lists Antioxidant Sources - Your Health TV - YouTube'
(Dr. Becker Lists Antioxidant Sources - Your Health TV - YouTube)


Thank you!

I do love my colored vegi's. If you buy your eggplant
before its gets too big, you can eat the skins too.
Lots of vits in the skin.

-T
Guess the Eyetalian part of the family tree is not large enough to develop a taste for eggplant. Never even tasted one till I was fully grown. They always looked sorta weird.
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Old 17-07-2013, 11:23 PM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Default Opinion piece on artificial sweeteners

On 07/14/2013 08:38 PM, Trawley Trash wrote:
On Sun, 14 Jul 2013 17:17:32 -0700
Todd wrote:

On 07/12/2013 07:28 AM, Trawley Trash wrote:
On Fri, 12 Jul 2013 02:58:13 +0000 (UTC)
"W. Baker" wrote:

Todd wrote:
: Hi All,

: Here is a great opinion piece on artificial sweeteners
: from a journal called:

: Trends in Endocrinology and Metabolism
: http://www.cell.com/trends/endocrinology-metabolism/

:
http://download.cell.com/images/edim...sm/tem_888.pdf

: A quick summary: artificial sweeteners initially trick the
: body into reacting as if something sweet is entering. Then
: the body gets wise to the trick and stops. Then when you
: do eat something sweet or carbie, the body doesn't react
: properly. And the satiation response doesn't kick in,
: causing overeating and T2 to kick in.

: Basically, the criticism of artificial sweeteners is
: that body gets wise to them and doesn't react appropriately
: to the real stuff. Not that the body thinks the fake stuff
: is real, but that the body starts to think the real stuff
: is fake.

: -T

I didn't read it, for various vision reasons, bu does Stevia do or
not do the same thing of tricking the body into thinking it is
getting sugar, etc? It most liekly is the sweetmess pf tehtaste
that is the problem, not its artificiality . the Stevia is also an
artificial sugar as it is someting pretending to be a sugar that is
not(no calories, no carbs) so if the non-nutritive(better word for
the general catgory) sweetener fools the body into thinking it is
gettign sugar, thusr eleasing insuin, etc, then Stevia is just as
guilty.

Wendy

I think that is probably right. Think about fructose. It is the
sweetest of the common sugars, but it provides no rush of glucose
into the blood. Instead it must be processed by the liver where
it generally ends up as fat. So we get an insulin response from
fructose, but no matching increase in glucose. Some people
develop hypos from this, and many more have to be careful about the
liver fat.


Here is a chart that shows glucose and fructose metabolism
and how they interact. (They interact A LOT!)

http://www.nutritionandmetabolism.co...1/89/figure/F1


Yup. That is the sort of thing I am trying to make sense of.
Similar charts in wikipedia under "fructose_metabolism" and
"glucose_metabolism". Notice that fructose and glucose both
connect directly to "extrahepatic metabolism". That means
they are used directly outside the liver. What this doesn't
say is that fructose is used by the testes in making sperm.
Glucose powers everything else. The dotted line from fructose
over toward glycogen is only active when the liver needs to
make more glycogen. So most of the fructose ends up as
lipoprotein (VLDL) before it is sent back into the blood.
These are blobs of fat. Some of the fructose does end up
in the glucose pathway converted into pyruvate and powering
the Krebs cycle, but this is all going on inside the liver.
Most glucose is never absorbed by the liver, but is directly
metabolized elsewhere.


It is a cleaver piece of "reverse engineering". What is missing is
what are the sensors, what are they looking for, what is the control
system trying to maintain, what is the high and low margins of how
far the control system can track, why does it choose to go one path
one time and another the next. Basically, our current understanding
is as thought looking through a glass dimly.

And, I would not think that there is enough inulin in a stevia
packet to throw your fructose too far off. If you were using
inulin as a straight sweetener, then, it would be another subject.
remember that the sugar in fruit and vegetables is a dehydrate
of fructose and glucose (frustose + glucose - water). You get
a lot more fructose eating a (ripe) tomato.



and the other another time.

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Old 18-07-2013, 03:43 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Default Opinion piece on artificial sweeteners

On 07/15/2013 02:21 PM, bigwheel wrote:
Guess the Eyetalian part of the family tree is not large enough to
develop a taste for eggplant. Never even tasted one till I was fully
grown. They always looked sorta weird.


Hi Big,

My "Eyetalian part" would be my mom's side. Yours?

There is a difference between fully grown and too old.
If you get them from a local farm, ask the farmer and
he will show you (as one did me) how to pick them.
Be careful, the buzzards have thorns! (At my
local farm, they go so quick, they never get too old.)

The local farms said they would have some in a week
or two. I will be begging for advice on how to
cook them when that happens. I got the pressure
cooker down, but not the frying.

Oh ya, and egg plant tastes like heck (not the
actual word I was thinking) when it is not grown
properly and sits on a shelf forever. Find a CSA farm.

-T

Maybe next year, I will try growing them.



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