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Old 18-07-2013, 04:13 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Default Opinion piece on artificial sweeteners

On Wed, 17 Jul 2013 15:23:05 -0700
Todd wrote:

And, I would not think that there is enough inulin in a stevia
packet to throw your fructose too far off. If you were using
inulin as a straight sweetener, then, it would be another subject.
remember that the sugar in fruit and vegetables is a dehydrate
of fructose and glucose (frustose + glucose - water). You get
a lot more fructose eating a (ripe) tomato.


You are describing the disaccharide sucrose which digests into
half fructose and half glucose. The sugars in fruits and vegetables
are not all sucrose. Some have more fructose than glucose when
they are ripe. Fruits are being bred for this property because
the extra sweetness sells. Apples, pears, grapes, and pineapples
fall into this category.

I can't eat tomatoes. I would only need half a gram of fructose to
see a problem, and one woman I met online says she has to keep her
daughter down to 9 mg. Then there is the question of whether some
bad effects are due to sweetness itself rather than any particular
sweetener. It is all very complicated.

I merely wanted to point out that inulin can be a problem, but I
am still working by trial and error. The advice I get from the
hfiinfo forum seems to be right on, but much of it defies my
understanding. Wheat is not OK, but shredded wheat is OK. Weird,
but it seems to be true. What can I say?


--
I'm Trawley Trash, and you haven't heard the last of me yet.


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Old 21-07-2013, 05:52 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Default Opinion piece on artificial sweeteners

On 07/17/2013 08:13 PM, Trawley Trash wrote:
You are describing the disaccharide sucrose which digests into
half fructose and half glucose. The sugars in fruits and vegetables
are not all sucrose. Some have more fructose than glucose when
they are ripe. Fruits are being bred for this property because
the extra sweetness sells. Apples, pears, grapes, and pineapples
fall into this category.

I can't eat tomatoes. I would only need half a gram of fructose to
see a problem, and one woman I met online says she has to keep her
daughter down to 9 mg. Then there is the question of whether some
bad effects are due to sweetness itself rather than any particular
sweetener. It is all very complicated.


Dear Mr. Trash,

Yes, I think I am funny! :-)

Sounds like there may be something wrong with your liver.
(Probably mine too.) If allowed to heal, the liver has
marvelous healing properties.

Foods (no one get ****ed at me, this is on topic!), also
called "traditional medicine", that have known healing
properties for the liver would be

Milk Thistle
Dandelion Root
Prickly Pear

Traditional medicine and modern medicine act differently.
Traditional medicine has side benefits. (For instance,
Hawthorn Berry helps calm an asthma attack, Milk Thistle
helps heal hepatitis damage, Prickly pear lowers your
blood sugar.)

Modern medicine has side effects. So trying the above would
only cost you a few dollars and would have very little
likely hood of any side effects. So win - draw.
Not win - loose.

-T

I'm Trawley Trash, and you haven't heard the last of me yet.


Why would I want too? As for me, I will babble on and
on and on and on ...

By any chance is "Trawley Trash" a reference us "riff raff"
would miss in some classic novel everyone wants to have read,
by no one wants to have actually read? :-)

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Old 21-07-2013, 07:38 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Default Opinion piece on artificial sweeteners


"Todd" wrote in message
...
On 07/17/2013 08:13 PM, Trawley Trash wrote:
You are describing the disaccharide sucrose which digests into
half fructose and half glucose. The sugars in fruits and vegetables
are not all sucrose. Some have more fructose than glucose when
they are ripe. Fruits are being bred for this property because
the extra sweetness sells. Apples, pears, grapes, and pineapples
fall into this category.

I can't eat tomatoes. I would only need half a gram of fructose to
see a problem, and one woman I met online says she has to keep her
daughter down to 9 mg. Then there is the question of whether some
bad effects are due to sweetness itself rather than any particular
sweetener. It is all very complicated.


Dear Mr. Trash,

Yes, I think I am funny! :-)

Sounds like there may be something wrong with your liver.
(Probably mine too.) If allowed to heal, the liver has
marvelous healing properties.

Foods (no one get ****ed at me, this is on topic!), also
called "traditional medicine", that have known healing
properties for the liver would be

Milk Thistle
Dandelion Root
Prickly Pear

Traditional medicine and modern medicine act differently.
Traditional medicine has side benefits. (For instance,
Hawthorn Berry helps calm an asthma attack, Milk Thistle
helps heal hepatitis damage, Prickly pear lowers your
blood sugar.)

Modern medicine has side effects. So trying the above would
only cost you a few dollars and would have very little
likely hood of any side effects. So win - draw.
Not win - loose.

-T

I'm Trawley Trash, and you haven't heard the last of me yet.


Why would I want too? As for me, I will babble on and
on and on and on ...

By any chance is "Trawley Trash" a reference us "riff raff"
would miss in some classic novel everyone wants to have read,
by no one wants to have actually read? :-)


Uh... Herbs and stuff have side effects too. In many respects they are
really no better than the prescribed stuff. For instance, red rice yeast
extract is a statin. Saint John's Wort can interfere with birth control and
other meds. These are not things to be taken lightly.


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Old 21-07-2013, 08:50 PM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Default Opinion piece on artificial sweeteners

In article , Todd
wrote:

On 07/17/2013 08:13 PM, Trawley Trash wrote:
You are describing the disaccharide sucrose which digests into
half fructose and half glucose. The sugars in fruits and vegetables
are not all sucrose. Some have more fructose than glucose when
they are ripe. Fruits are being bred for this property because
the extra sweetness sells. Apples, pears, grapes, and pineapples
fall into this category.

I can't eat tomatoes. I would only need half a gram of fructose to
see a problem, and one woman I met online says she has to keep her
daughter down to 9 mg. Then there is the question of whether some
bad effects are due to sweetness itself rather than any particular
sweetener. It is all very complicated.


Dear Mr. Trash,

Yes, I think I am funny! :-)

Sounds like there may be something wrong with your liver.
(Probably mine too.) If allowed to heal, the liver has
marvelous healing properties.

Foods (no one get ****ed at me, this is on topic!),


You seem to underestimate the self-importance of some people.

also
called "traditional medicine",


or nutraceuticals

that have known healing
properties for the liver would be

Milk Thistle

Milk thistle seeds contain a bioflavonoid complex known as silymarin.
Milk thistle seeds can be ground and eaten or made into a tea. Use 12-15
grams/day. Leaves, and roots are of little use. Its roots are similar to
salsify when boiled. The flowering heads before opening are similar to
artichokes, but a lot smaller, and the leaves, while edible are a pain
to deal with, because of their thorns. Do not grow in high nitrogen soil.

Dandelion Root

Dandelion is commonly used as a food. The leaves are used in salads and
teas, while the roots are often used as a coffee substitute. Unopened
flower buds can be used in fritters[183] and they can also be preserved
in vinegar and used like capers. The plant is high in vitamins and
minerals. Unfortunately for Todd, the root has a turnip like flavor.

Prickly Pear

Too wide a net Todd. Only one of about 200 species of Opuntia, also
known as nopales or paddle cactus will suppress a post prandial b.g.
rise, and that is O. streptacantha. It does this by blocking the
breakdown of starches, and disaccharides to glucose. In contrast, O.
megacantha may have toxic effects on the kidney. Other than that, it
seems to be a healthful food with vitamines, minerals, and fiber.


Traditional medicine and modern medicine act differently.
Traditional medicine has side benefits. (For instance,
Hawthorn Berry helps calm an asthma attack, Milk Thistle
helps heal hepatitis damage, Prickly pear lowers your
blood sugar.)


Todd, you are being wildly inaccurate. There many types of Hawthorne,
and Prickly Pear (Opuntia), they vary in their degree of healthiness as
nutraceuticals. While milk thistle is a decorative plant, and edible,
it's the seeds that are important to your liver. That said, you may be
better off going to an herbal shop, and just buy the standardized
extracts.

Modern medicine has side effects. So trying the above would
only cost you a few dollars and would have very little
likely hood of any side effects. So win - draw.
Not win - loose.

-T

I'm Trawley Trash, and you haven't heard the last of me yet.


Why would I want too? As for me, I will babble on and
on and on and on ...


Actually, Todd seems to be a founding member of On-N-On-N-On. ;O)

By any chance is "Trawley Trash" a reference us "riff raff"
would miss in some classic novel everyone wants to have read,
by no one wants to have actually read? :-)


or related to Trish Trash?
--
Palestinian Child Detained
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zzSzH38jYcg

Remember Rachel Corrie
http://www.rachelcorrie.org/

Welcome to the New America.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hA736oK9FPg
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Old 22-07-2013, 12:01 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Default Opinion piece on artificial sweeteners

In article
,
Billy wrote:

In article , Todd
wrote:

On 07/17/2013 08:13 PM, Trawley Trash wrote:
You are describing the disaccharide sucrose which digests into
half fructose and half glucose. The sugars in fruits and vegetables
are not all sucrose. Some have more fructose than glucose when
they are ripe. Fruits are being bred for this property because
the extra sweetness sells. Apples, pears, grapes, and pineapples
fall into this category.

I can't eat tomatoes. I would only need half a gram of fructose to
see a problem, and one woman I met online says she has to keep her
daughter down to 9 mg. Then there is the question of whether some
bad effects are due to sweetness itself rather than any particular
sweetener. It is all very complicated.


Dear Mr. Trash,

Yes, I think I am funny! :-)

Sounds like there may be something wrong with your liver.
(Probably mine too.) If allowed to heal, the liver has
marvelous healing properties.

Foods (no one get ****ed at me, this is on topic!),


You seem to underestimate the self-importance of some people.

also
called "traditional medicine",


or nutraceuticals

that have known healing
properties for the liver would be

Milk Thistle

Milk thistle seeds contain a bioflavonoid complex known as silymarin.
Milk thistle seeds can be ground and eaten or made into a tea. Use 12-15
grams/day. Leaves, and roots are of little use. Its roots are similar to
salsify when boiled. The flowering heads before opening are similar to
artichokes, but a lot smaller, and the leaves, while edible are a pain
to deal with, because of their thorns. Do not grow in high nitrogen soil.

Dandelion Root

Dandelion is commonly used as a food. The leaves are used in salads and
teas, while the roots are often used as a coffee substitute. Unopened
flower buds can be used in fritters[183] and they can also be preserved
in vinegar and used like capers. The plant is high in vitamins and
minerals. Unfortunately for Todd, the root has a turnip like flavor.

Prickly Pear

Too wide a net Todd. Only one of about 200 species of Opuntia, also
known as nopales or paddle cactus will suppress a post prandial b.g.
rise, and that is O. streptacantha. It does this by blocking the
breakdown of starches, and disaccharides to glucose. In contrast, O.
megacantha may have toxic effects on the kidney. Other than that, it
seems to be a healthful food with vitamines, minerals, and fiber.


Traditional medicine and modern medicine act differently.
Traditional medicine has side benefits. (For instance,
Hawthorn Berry helps calm an asthma attack, Milk Thistle
helps heal hepatitis damage, Prickly pear lowers your
blood sugar.)


Todd, you are being wildly inaccurate. There many types of Hawthorne,
and Prickly Pear (Opuntia), they vary in their degree of healthiness as
nutraceuticals. While milk thistle is a decorative plant, and edible,
it's the seeds that are important to your liver. That said, you may be
better off going to an herbal shop, and just buy the standardized
extracts.

Modern medicine has side effects. So trying the above would
only cost you a few dollars and would have very little
likely hood of any side effects. So win - draw.
Not win - loose.

-T

I'm Trawley Trash, and you haven't heard the last of me yet.


Why would I want too? As for me, I will babble on and
on and on and on ...


Actually, Todd seems to be a founding member of On-N-On-N-On. ;O)

By any chance is "Trawley Trash" a reference us "riff raff"
would miss in some classic novel everyone wants to have read,
by no one wants to have actually read? :-)


or related to Trish Trash?


I forgot to mention that you may want to try "bitter melon" as well. I
presume that you have the heat for it, if you live in Nevada. It grows
on a trellis.
--
Palestinian Child Detained
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zzSzH38jYcg

Remember Rachel Corrie
http://www.rachelcorrie.org/

Welcome to the New America.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hA736oK9FPg


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Old 22-07-2013, 01:48 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Default Opinion piece on artificial sweeteners

On Sat, 20 Jul 2013 21:52:09 -0700
Todd wrote:

On 07/17/2013 08:13 PM, Trawley Trash wrote:
Sounds like there may be something wrong with your liver.
(Probably mine too.) If allowed to heal, the liver has
marvelous healing properties.

Foods (no one get ****ed at me, this is on topic!), also
called "traditional medicine", that have known healing
properties for the liver would be

Milk Thistle
Dandelion Root
Prickly Pear


Yes, I am beginning to think the problem may actually
be in the liver. I have been studying HFI (hereditary
fructose intolerance), and that is caused by low levels
of a liver enzyme called aldolase-B. My ELISA blood
allergy test showed reactions to every sweet thing
I eat. When I switched from apples (strong reaction)
to pears (no reaction but rarely eaten), I developed an
allergy to pears. Somehow fructose is causing new
IgG allergies to develop. Along with that I do
not seem to be able to metabolize fructose; it makes
me very sleepy.

With HFI the symptom used for diagnosis is low blood
sugar (hypos) that can occur a day or so after eating
fructose. So I began to wonder what would happen if
a person with type II was also HFI. The BG may
read normal or even high during a "hyoo". Type II *masks*
HFI so that it will never be diagnosed. Genetic studies show
that the frequency of the genetic markers is much
higher than the rate of diagnosis. In fact HFI
seems to be about 99 percent underdiagnosed. So I
suspect a deficiency in some liver enzymes
may be part of the problem.

I started on milk thistle a month ago. It has been a
traditional remedy for so long that I do not worry about
it. Since I changed several things at once, I
can't be sure it is this supplement, but I am gaining
strength while holding my weight down. FBG is up a bit
into the 90s, but I think that is the result of
my experiments trying to eat bread.

Now I am going back to potatoes only for my
starches. I eat around 300 grams of them per
day, so the diet that works for me is not low
carb but low fructose. Wheat and other grasses
contain starch-like polymers called fructans.
Inulin is one of them. Generally they are counted
as fiber on food labels, but gut bacteria can
break them down and release fructose.

Traditional medicine and modern medicine act differently.
Traditional medicine has side benefits. (For instance,
Hawthorn Berry helps calm an asthma attack, Milk Thistle
helps heal hepatitis damage, Prickly pear lowers your
blood sugar.)

Modern medicine has side effects. So trying the above would
only cost you a few dollars and would have very little
likely hood of any side effects. So win - draw.
Not win - loose.


I have already begun taking milk thistle. Mainstream
medicine failed me, so now I take
what is useful wherever I find it.

I'm Trawley Trash, and you haven't heard the last of me yet.


Why would I want too? As for me, I will babble on and
on and on and on ...

By any chance is "Trawley Trash" a reference us "riff raff"
would miss in some classic novel everyone wants to have read,
by no one wants to have actually read? :-)


There is no literary reference that I am aware of. I was
living in a trailer at the time I made it up. I like to
use nicks that no one will mistake for a real name. However
I soon received an email from someone in the Philippines
who claimed to know me.

--
I'm Trawley Trash, and you haven't heard the last of me yet.

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Old 22-07-2013, 02:08 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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On 07/21/2013 12:50 PM, Billy wrote:
also
called "traditional medicine",

or nutraceuticals


My understanding of "nutraceuticals" is that they are
refined natural products and not the unrefined stuff
that herbalists usually use. Herbalists use both.

This is why I like the phrase "Traditional Medicine".
It does not limit, vitamins, herbs, nutraceuticals,
etc..

Some nutraceuticals get a little too close to
pharmaceuticals, which can give anaphylactic shock.

I could be wrong now. (I am sure I will be told so,
if I am. Which is okay, as long as you are nice about
it)

-T
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Old 22-07-2013, 02:14 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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On 07/21/2013 04:35 PM, Billy wrote:
Todd would have made a stronger argument that allopathic medicine rarely
appeals to our Epicurean senses the way nutraceuticals can.


I stand corrected!


For example:
Bitter Melon Delight

Ingredients:
1 Bitter Melon (seeded and sliced)



I can not find the carb count on this on USDA or
Self. AAAAAAAAAAHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH!!!!!!!

Can you send me a link?



2 Eggs
3-4 pieces of Bacon


Your the man!

? tsp. Garlic


A lot. (Proof God loves us.)

1 tsp. thin Soy Sauce


Uh oh. I have to stay away from Soy Sauce. What
seasoning would you sub? Paprika has a dark
smoky flavor, maybe? Add more bacon, it is smoky?

Pepper
Directions:
Beat eggs and stir fry with Bitter Melon, bacon, garlic, and soy sauce.
Add a dash of pepper to taste.
This is a traditional Thai dish.



It can also be prepared without bacon


NOOOOOOO!!!

or

Bitter Melon Gazpacho

Serves: 20
Submitted by: Andi Sutton

Ingredients:
4 large cans v-8 (or 6 - 8 lg. tomatoes)
2 sticks celery
2 red peppers: diced
1 green pepper: diced
2 yellow peppers: diced
2 cucumbers: diced
1 Bitter Melon: cored and diced
2 bunches scallions: diced
2 bunches cilantro: diced (Substitute parsley)
Vinegar to taste
Tabasco sauce to taste (you could just add hot peppers)
Optional: carrots, garlic, and turmeric to taste
Directions:
Wash and prepare all vegetables. Blend ? the diced vegetables in a
blender with the tomato juice. Stir in remaining vegetables and add salt
and tobasco to taste. Chill overnight. Ladle in to Bitter Melon cups,
sprinkle with extra cilantro and serve.

w/

Rhubarb pie,

or

prunella and mint tea.

Allopathic medicine, eat your heart out.


Hear! Hear!

-T

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Old 22-07-2013, 02:32 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Default Opinion piece on artificial sweeteners

On 07/21/2013 12:50 PM, Billy wrote:
I'm Trawley Trash, and you haven't heard the last of me yet.

Why would I want too? As for me, I will babble on and
on and on and on ...

Actually, Todd seems to be a founding member of On-N-On-N-On. ;O)



"On-N-On-N-On"!!! Why I, I ,I, You take my breath away!
Take it back. For the love of all that is good and decent,
take it back!!! "On-N-On-N-On" Never, I tell you, Never!

Okay, stop tapping your fingers and giving me incredulous
looks. I can see them all the way through the Internet!
Even I am not an endless source of this flowery bull s---.
(Perhaps. Maybe. Don't count on it.) You are still
tapping! Don't think I don't see you!

Why would anyone, *especially Billy*, say such a thing!
KIDS THESE DAYS!!!


Okay, you got me dead to rights. Membership applications
are now accepted "On-N-On-N-On Foundation":

-- no memberships dues

-- you have to be nice, especially when you disagree,

-- your have to admit to burning food at least once
in your life,

-- you have admit to having used a bit too much
garlic time once your life as well,

-- AND, no cracking jokes about the other person's
cooking screw ups/debacles, unless, of course,
the jokes are funny

-T

T2's these days!
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Old 22-07-2013, 03:11 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Default Opinion piece on artificial sweeteners

On 07/21/2013 04:01 PM, Billy wrote:
Traditional medicine and modern medicine act differently.
Traditional medicine has side benefits. (For instance,
Hawthorn Berry helps calm an asthma attack, Milk Thistle
helps heal hepatitis damage, Prickly pear lowers your
blood sugar.)


Todd, you are being wildly inaccurate. There many types of Hawthorne,
and Prickly Pear (Opuntia), they vary in their degree of healthiness as
nutraceuticals. While milk thistle is a decorative plant, and edible,
it's the seeds that are important to your liver. That said, you may be
better off going to an herbal shop, and just buy the standardized
extracts.


Yes, of course. And, seek profession advice first.

Use the Hawthorne that the herbalists use (Crataegus spp).

https://www.swansonvitamins.com/swan...50-mg-120-caps

https://www.swansonvitamins.com/natu...1-fl-oz-liquid

This is the famous American Herbalist, Dr. Christopher's formula,
but it contains honey:
http://www.vitacost.com/christophers...rup-16-fl-oz-1


I use "Opuntia ficus-indica - leaf" (Nopal, Pinkly Pear):
https://www.swansonvitamins.com/swan...50-mg-180-caps

Opuntia streptacantha Lemaire works too.
Here is a good double blind on Opuntia streptacantha Lemai
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3276479

Thank you for the heads up. I will make sure I say
exactly which herb I am speaking of next time.

-T


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Old 22-07-2013, 03:44 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Default Opinion piece on artificial sweeteners

On 07/21/2013 04:35 PM, Billy wrote:
Todd would have made a stronger argument that allopathic medicine rarely
appeals to our Epicurean senses the way nutraceuticals can.

For example:
Bitter Melon Delight


And using the scientific method (double blind):

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21211558

J Ethnopharmacol. 2011 Mar 24;134(2):422-8. doi:
10.1016/j.jep.2010.12.045. Epub 2011 Jan 4.
Hypoglycemic effect of bitter melon compared with metformin in newly
diagnosed type 2 diabetes patients.
Fuangchan A, Sonthisombat P, Seubnukarn T, Chanouan R, Chotchaisuwat P,
Sirigulsatien V, Ingkaninan K, Plianbangchang P, Haines ST.
Source

Department of Pharmacy Practice, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences,
Naresuan University, Muang, Phitsanulok 65000, Thailand.
Abstract
ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE:

Bitter melon (Momordica charantia L.) has been widely used as an
traditional medicine treatment for diabetic patients in Asia. In vitro
and animal studies suggested its hypoglycemic activity, but limited
human studies are available to support its use.
AIM OF STUDY:

This study was conducted to assess the efficacy and safety of three
doses of bitter melon compared with metformin.
MATERIALS AND METHODS:

This is a 4-week, multicenter, randomized, double-blind, active-control
trial. Patients were randomized into 4 groups to receive bitter melon
500 mg/day, 1,000 mg/day, and 2,000 mg/day or metformin 1,000 mg/day.
All patients were followed for 4 weeks.
RESULTS:

There was a significant decline in fructosamine at week 4 of the
metformin group (-16.8; 95% CI, -31.2, -2.4 μmol/L) and the bitter melon
2,000 mg/day group (-10.2; 95% CI, -19.1, -1.3 μmol/L). Bitter melon 500
and 1,000 mg/day did not significantly decrease fructosamine levels
(-3.5; 95% CI -11.7, 4.6 and -10.3; 95% CI -22.7, 2.2 μmol/L, respectively).
CONCLUSIONS:

Bitter melon had a modest hypoglycemic effect and significantly reduced
fructosamine levels from baseline among patients with type 2 diabetes
who received 2,000 mg/day. However, the hypoglycemic effect of bitter
melon was less than metformin 1,000 mg/day.
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Old 22-07-2013, 03:59 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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"Todd" wrote in message
...
On 07/21/2013 12:50 PM, Billy wrote:
also
called "traditional medicine",

or nutraceuticals


My understanding of "nutraceuticals" is that they are
refined natural products and not the unrefined stuff
that herbalists usually use. Herbalists use both.

This is why I like the phrase "Traditional Medicine".
It does not limit, vitamins, herbs, nutraceuticals,
etc..

Some nutraceuticals get a little too close to
pharmaceuticals, which can give anaphylactic shock.

I could be wrong now. (I am sure I will be told so,
if I am. Which is okay, as long as you are nice about
it)


Nutraceuticals is a rather meaningless term. Where is Ted Rosenberg when
you need him? He'd be all over this!


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Old 22-07-2013, 04:21 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Julie Bove wrote:

Julie,

I woudl assume that when todd talks of "ratpoison" he is referrig to
warfarin, w tricky blood thinner taken by people who have suffered
congestive heart failue, are in danger of blod clots or have atrial
fibrilation, which also canled tothrowing off blood clots that can ladge
in the ehet, lungs or even the brain leading to strokes. My husband wsa
on this for about 3 years. It is also used as a rat poison as it can make
the blood so thin that it leads to internat bleeding adn death. That is
why peole on this drug get teted every week or two to make sure their
dosage ic correct adn the blood not too thick or thin.

It can be a life saver, but , as I said , is tricky. they now have
developed about 2 or 3 new drugs that can be used without the need for the
frequent blood test, but they are quite new , havingbeen introduced only
this past school year.

Wendy
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Old 22-07-2013, 04:33 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Default Opinion piece on artificial sweeteners

W. Baker wrote:
Julie Bove wrote:

Julie,

I woudl assume that when todd talks of "ratpoison" he is referrig to
warfarin, w tricky blood thinner taken by people who have suffered
congestive heart failue, are in danger of blod clots or have atrial
fibrilation, which also canled tothrowing off blood clots that can
ladge in the ehet, lungs or even the brain leading to strokes. My
husband wsa on this for about 3 years. It is also used as a rat
poison as it can make the blood so thin that it leads to internat
bleeding adn death. That is why peole on this drug get teted every
week or two to make sure their dosage ic correct adn the blood not
too thick or thin.

Oh. My friend has atrial fib but is not on a blood thinner yet.

It can be a life saver, but , as I said , is tricky. they now have
developed about 2 or 3 new drugs that can be used without the need
for the frequent blood test, but they are quite new , havingbeen
introduced only this past school year.


Yes. I have seen the commercials.


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Old 22-07-2013, 04:24 PM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Default Opinion piece on artificial sweeteners

On Sun, 21 Jul 2013 19:44:55 -0700
Todd wrote:

Bitter melon had a modest hypoglycemic effect and significantly
reduced fructosamine levels from baseline among patients with type 2
diabetes who received 2,000 mg/day. However, the hypoglycemic effect
of bitter melon was less than metformin 1,000 mg/day.


Generally I take 100000 to 200000 milligrams of bitter melon.
Chicken soup with bitter melon and potato/mung bean noodles is to
die for. No bacon needed.


--
I'm Trawley Trash, and you haven't heard the last of me yet.



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