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Old 29-07-2006, 08:51 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Corned Beef vs Salt Beef (naval beef)

I usualy make traditional salt beef stew (east cost stew, newfie stew), with
salt beef, lots of cabbage, etc. Well, I have been having a hard time
finding the stuff recently so I purchased corned beef instead today, which
is similar in its salinity, which gives the stew a unique taste, but very
different cuts of meat

My issue is, that it's not getting tender as salt beef usualy did, the
corned beef tastes great but is very tough texture.

My plan at the moment is to cut it in very thin slices instead of cubing
next time. I think there might be a better alternative? Anyone know a good
natural way to tenderize corned beef while keeping it cubed?



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Old 29-07-2006, 10:52 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Corned Beef vs Salt Beef (naval beef)

Peter wrote:
I usualy make traditional salt beef stew (east cost stew, newfie
stew), with salt beef, lots of cabbage, etc. Well, I have been
having a hard time finding the stuff recently so I purchased corned
beef instead today, which is similar in its salinity, which gives the
stew a unique taste, but very different cuts of meat

My issue is, that it's not getting tender as salt beef usualy did, the
corned beef tastes great but is very tough texture.

My plan at the moment is to cut it in very thin slices instead of
cubing next time. I think there might be a better alternative?
Anyone know a good natural way to tenderize corned beef while keeping
it cubed?


My question is, who appointed you chief cook and bottle-washer? Corned beef
is not served "cubed". It's sliced thinly against the grain after being
boiled or baked or even crock-potted for a long slow cooking time. At least
you got the cabbage part right

Jill


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Old 29-07-2006, 11:24 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Corned Beef vs Salt Beef (naval beef)


"jmcquown" wrote in message
...
Peter wrote:
I usualy make traditional salt beef stew (east cost stew, newfie
stew), with salt beef, lots of cabbage, etc. Well, I have been
having a hard time finding the stuff recently so I purchased corned
beef instead today, which is similar in its salinity, which gives the
stew a unique taste, but very different cuts of meat

My issue is, that it's not getting tender as salt beef usualy did, the
corned beef tastes great but is very tough texture.

My plan at the moment is to cut it in very thin slices instead of
cubing next time. I think there might be a better alternative?
Anyone know a good natural way to tenderize corned beef while keeping
it cubed?


My question is, who appointed you chief cook and bottle-washer? Corned
beef
is not served "cubed". It's sliced thinly against the grain after being
boiled or baked or even crock-potted for a long slow cooking time. At
least
you got the cabbage part right



Your question about who appointed me serves no purpose here I don't know
how corn beef is traditional served and that was not my question. I'm trying
to apply it to how I want it served as an alternative to salt beef which I
can not find localy at this time.

Thankfully, you not being the chef, I figured out after a lengthy boiling
(approx 90-120 minutes for those trying the same), it became very tender,
eating a bowl of great stew as we speak.


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Old 29-07-2006, 11:43 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Corned Beef vs Salt Beef (naval beef)

Peter wrote:
"jmcquown" wrote in message
...
Peter wrote:
I usualy make traditional salt beef stew (east cost stew, newfie
stew), with salt beef, lots of cabbage, etc. Well, I have been
having a hard time finding the stuff recently so I purchased corned
beef instead today, which is similar in its salinity, which gives
the stew a unique taste, but very different cuts of meat

My issue is, that it's not getting tender as salt beef usualy did,
the corned beef tastes great but is very tough texture.

My plan at the moment is to cut it in very thin slices instead of
cubing next time. I think there might be a better alternative?
Anyone know a good natural way to tenderize corned beef while
keeping
it cubed?


My question is, who appointed you chief cook and bottle-washer?
Corned beef
is not served "cubed". It's sliced thinly against the grain after
being boiled or baked or even crock-potted for a long slow cooking
time. At least
you got the cabbage part right



Your question about who appointed me serves no purpose here I
don't know how corn beef is traditional served and that was not my
question. I'm trying to apply it to how I want it served as an
alternative to salt beef which I can not find localy at this time.

Thankfully, you not being the chef, I figured out after a lengthy
boiling (approx 90-120 minutes for those trying the same), it became
very tender, eating a bowl of great stew as we speak.


Congratulations! And I've never heard of salt beef, either, but that's
neither here nor there. You are apparently not a good cook or you'd not
have to ask these questions.


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Old 29-07-2006, 11:53 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Corned Beef vs Salt Beef (naval beef)

Peter wrote:
"jmcquown" wrote in message
...
Peter wrote:
I usualy make traditional salt beef stew (east cost stew, newfie
stew), with salt beef, lots of cabbage, etc. Well, I have been
having a hard time finding the stuff recently so I purchased corned
beef instead today, which is similar in its salinity, which gives
the stew a unique taste, but very different cuts of meat

My issue is, that it's not getting tender as salt beef usualy did,
the corned beef tastes great but is very tough texture.

My plan at the moment is to cut it in very thin slices instead of
cubing next time. I think there might be a better alternative?
Anyone know a good natural way to tenderize corned beef while
keeping
it cubed?


My question is, who appointed you chief cook and bottle-washer?
Corned beef
is not served "cubed". It's sliced thinly against the grain after
being boiled or baked or even crock-potted for a long slow cooking
time. At least
you got the cabbage part right



Your question about who appointed me serves no purpose here I
don't know how corn beef is traditional served and that was not my
question. I'm trying to apply it to how I want it served as an
alternative to salt beef which I can not find localy at this time.

Thankfully, you not being the chef, I figured out after a lengthy
boiling (approx 90-120 minutes for those trying the same), it became
very tender, eating a bowl of great stew as we speak.


I'm not THE chef, but I know how to cook corned beef brisket. Why on earth
would it need to be cubed? Corned beef is sliced across the grain thinly
and served with steamed cabbage and sometimes sliced carrots and cubed
potatoes. I have no idea what you're talking about when you say "cubed"
corned beef.

Jill




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Old 29-07-2006, 11:55 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Corned Beef vs Salt Beef (naval beef)




My credentials far out weigh your bitchiness


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Old 30-07-2006, 12:02 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Corned Beef vs Salt Beef (naval beef)


I'm not THE chef, but I know how to cook corned beef brisket. Why on
earth
would it need to be cubed? Corned beef is sliced across the grain thinly
and served with steamed cabbage and sometimes sliced carrots and cubed
potatoes. I have no idea what you're talking about when you say "cubed"
corned beef.

Jill



I am asking how I could apply it to the meal I was trying to make, the one
described with 3 altrnative names in my first post. "Why on earth it needs
to be cubed" is also described in my first post. You also apparently don't
know what "cubed" meansaccording to your own words, even though you didn't
know why it needed to be cubed. Thanks for trolling my thread.


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Old 30-07-2006, 12:12 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Corned Beef vs Salt Beef (naval beef)

jmcquown wrote on 29 Jul 2006 in rec.food.cooking

Peter wrote:
"jmcquown" wrote in message
...
Peter wrote:
I usualy make traditional salt beef stew (east cost stew, newfie
stew), with salt beef, lots of cabbage, etc. Well, I have been
having a hard time finding the stuff recently so I purchased
corned beef instead today, which is similar in its salinity, which
gives the stew a unique taste, but very different cuts of meat

My issue is, that it's not getting tender as salt beef usualy did,
the corned beef tastes great but is very tough texture.

My plan at the moment is to cut it in very thin slices instead of
cubing next time. I think there might be a better alternative?
Anyone know a good natural way to tenderize corned beef while
keeping
it cubed?

My question is, who appointed you chief cook and bottle-washer?
Corned beef
is not served "cubed". It's sliced thinly against the grain after
being boiled or baked or even crock-potted for a long slow cooking
time. At least
you got the cabbage part right



Your question about who appointed me serves no purpose here I
don't know how corn beef is traditional served and that was not my
question. I'm trying to apply it to how I want it served as an
alternative to salt beef which I can not find localy at this time.

Thankfully, you not being the chef, I figured out after a lengthy
boiling (approx 90-120 minutes for those trying the same), it became
very tender, eating a bowl of great stew as we speak.


I'm not THE chef, but I know how to cook corned beef brisket. Why on
earth would it need to be cubed? Corned beef is sliced across the
grain thinly and served with steamed cabbage and sometimes sliced
carrots and cubed potatoes. I have no idea what you're talking about
when you say "cubed" corned beef.

Jill




err Jill? Go back and read his first posting...The guy is using corned
beef as a subsitute for salted beef...hence the cubing. He is not making
Corned beef and cabbage....Salt beef is somewhat like salt cod...(except
it is beef AFAIK)...Corned beef is soaked in a brine...hence suitable as
a substitution.

Newfies (people from Newfoundland) find work all over Canada....but can't
find their regional foods everywhere. They have a rich culture and a
language all their own (even if it is based on English and Galic).
You have to live 5 or 6 generations in Newfounland to be thought of as an
Islander and not "from away".

Newfoundland is probably the first inhabited (from Europe) chunk of land
over here in N. America....Something about Viking settlements excavation
sites before the 1400's (probably before the 1000's). Even myths about
Irish monks coming over in ox skin round boats and relics found from
around the 1200's.

--


Curiosity killed the cat, but for a while I was a suspect

-Alan
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Old 30-07-2006, 12:27 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Corned Beef vs Salt Beef (naval beef)

In news:[email protected],
Peter typed:
My credentials far out weigh your bitchiness


Ahhh. I see you've met Jill. She's probably super-bitchy these days
since she recently discovered that she's waiting for her father to
die.
QUOTE from a response to Goomba38." s*** on a shingle" thread:
"Get over it. I have. In fact, I can't wait until my father dies."


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Old 30-07-2006, 01:50 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Corned Beef vs Salt Beef (naval beef)


"Peter" wrote in message
news:6%[email protected]
I usualy make traditional salt beef stew (east cost stew, newfie stew),
with salt beef, lots of cabbage, etc. Well, I have been having a hard time
finding the stuff recently so I purchased corned beef instead today, which
is similar in its salinity, which gives the stew a unique taste, but very
different cuts of meat

My issue is, that it's not getting tender as salt beef usualy did, the
corned beef tastes great but is very tough texture.

My plan at the moment is to cut it in very thin slices instead of cubing
next time. I think there might be a better alternative? Anyone know a
good natural way to tenderize corned beef while keeping it cubed?



Thanks everyone for the help Like Steve said, it just needs to cook
longer than Salt Beef. The dish turned out great. Not quite the same but
deffinitly a workable substitute.




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Old 30-07-2006, 02:35 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Corned Beef vs Salt Beef (naval beef)

Jill wrote:

You are apparently not a good cook or you'd not have to ask these
questions.


Er...what? Since when are good cooks the only people allowed to post here?

Bob


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Old 30-07-2006, 02:50 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Corned Beef vs Salt Beef (naval beef)

Bob Terwilliger wrote:
Jill wrote:

You are apparently not a good cook or you'd not have to ask these
questions.


Er...what? Since when are good cooks the only people allowed to post
here?

Bob


Good point, Bob And by the way, yes I wish my father was dead. He's a
drag on my mother who wishes she didn't have to tend him and make sure he
doesn't wander off and practically tend his diapers every day. (sigh) So
much for being a colonel, eh? Stupid is as stupid does, especially when one
has a gun.

Jill


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Old 30-07-2006, 03:45 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Corned Beef vs Salt Beef (naval beef)

In article ,
"Bob Terwilliger" wrote:

Jill wrote:

You are apparently not a good cook or you'd not have to ask these
questions.


Er...what? Since when are good cooks the only people allowed to post here?

Bob


And even the best cooks can screw up a new recipe when either attempting
to substitute, or trying a new ingredient for the first time...

It's part of the learning process and IMHO being _able_ to learn is part
of what makes a good cook!

I remember the first time I tried to stuff whole baby octopus...... G
They needed to be braised or pressure cooked, _not_ fried!
--
Peace!
Om

"My mother never saw the irony in calling me a Son of a bitch"
-- Jack Nicholson
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Old 30-07-2006, 03:46 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Corned Beef vs Salt Beef (naval beef)

In article ,
"jmcquown" wrote:

Bob Terwilliger wrote:
Jill wrote:

You are apparently not a good cook or you'd not have to ask these
questions.


Er...what? Since when are good cooks the only people allowed to post
here?

Bob


Good point, Bob And by the way, yes I wish my father was dead. He's a
drag on my mother who wishes she didn't have to tend him and make sure he
doesn't wander off and practically tend his diapers every day. (sigh) So
much for being a colonel, eh? Stupid is as stupid does, especially when one
has a gun.

Jill


She could place him in a nursing home? Or is that just not an option?
--
Peace!
Om

"My mother never saw the irony in calling me a Son of a bitch"
-- Jack Nicholson
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Old 30-07-2006, 05:44 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Corned Beef vs Salt Beef (naval beef)


jmcquown wrote:
I'm not THE chef, but I know how to cook corned beef brisket. Why on earth
would it need to be cubed? Corned beef is sliced across the grain thinly
and served with steamed cabbage and sometimes sliced carrots and cubed
potatoes. I have no idea what you're talking about when you say "cubed"
corned beef.

Jill


Just because YOU serve it thin doesn't mean it's the only way.
WE serve it in THICK slices, sometimes with a parsley sauce, sometimes
with a spicy chutney accompaniment and the list of veg is ever changing
depending on the season.

AND for the record, I have finely cubed (cooked) corned beef and added
it to a few dishes:
nice alternative to bacon or ham in fried rice
also nice added to a white cheese sauce and served over spuds
in their jackets
added to scrambled eggs for brunch
the list continues to grow.

You are coming across as very intractible Jill.
Give the guy a break. He asked a simple question and you needlessly
berrated him.
Why?
What makes you an authority?
Or me for that matter?
Costs nothing to be civil, when a civil question is posed.

By the way Peter, if you are looking for a recipe for corned beef my
style, it's listed in the signature dishes section of the unofficial
rfc website:
http://www.recfoodcooking.com/signature.php
along with an amazing variety of great dishes from other
rfc'ers...check it out!

LadyJane
--
"Never trust a skinny cook!"
.........or one who is too quick to criticise



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