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Old 04-04-2006, 01:17 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default What to do with London Broil?

I have no idea why there is a near to 3 lb. London Broil (dated
recently) in my freezer, as I've never "owned" one before. I've looked
online for cooking suggestion, but have no way to barbeque or grill it.
There's only myself to feed here, so preparation suggestions, please?

PickyPuzzles


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Old 04-04-2006, 01:23 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default What to do with London Broil?

PickyJaz wrote:

I have no idea why there is a near to 3 lb. London Broil (dated
recently) in my freezer, as I've never "owned" one before. I've looked
online for cooking suggestion, but have no way to barbeque or grill it.
There's only myself to feed here, so preparation suggestions, please?

PickyPuzzles


Broil? Look for steak recipes where you start it in a hot pan on the
stove and finish in the oven.



Dawn

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Old 04-04-2006, 01:38 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default What to do with London Broil?


PickyJaz wrote:
I have no idea why there is a near to 3 lb. London Broil (dated
recently) in my freezer, as I've never "owned" one before. I've looked
online for cooking suggestion, but have no way to barbeque or grill it.
There's only myself to feed here, so preparation suggestions, please?


Do you own a meat grinder, would make a lovely meat loaf.
You can also turn it into 3/8" dice for vegetable beef soup or
a great mushroom beef barley. Of course you can always
simply whack it into three 1 lb sections, marinate, and pan fry.

Sheldon

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Old 04-04-2006, 01:59 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default What to do with London Broil?

PickyJaz wrote:
I have no idea why there is a near to 3 lb. London Broil (dated
recently) in my freezer, as I've never "owned" one before. I've looked
online for cooking suggestion, but have no way to barbeque or grill it.
There's only myself to feed here, so preparation suggestions, please?

London Broil was originally a recipe, or set of recipes, not a cut of
meat. Nowadays you see packages with that label at many meat counters.
I suppose that's a case of giving the customers what they think they
want. At any rate, I think it's usually top round, a relatively lean
and relatively tough cut. What to do with it depends somewhat on how
thick it is.

If it's no more than 1.5 inches thick you can marinate it in something
with a bit of tenderizing action, then broil it to medium rare, then
slice it thinly to serve.

If it's thicker than that someone else will have to offer a suggestion.
Maybe marinate it for a long time and then dry roast it, I dunno.....
-aem

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Old 04-04-2006, 02:54 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default What to do with London Broil?

PickyJaz wrote:
I have no idea why there is a near to 3 lb. London Broil (dated
recently) in my freezer, as I've never "owned" one before. I've
looked online for cooking suggestion, but have no way to barbeque or
grill it. There's only myself to feed here, so preparation
suggestions, please?

PickyPuzzles


Technically, there is no such cut of meat as "London broil". London broil
is a recipe. You are probably looking at a 3 lb. sirloin steak. Marinate
it then broil or grill it. It won't be very tender without the marindade,
which is part and partial to a good London broil anyway I suggest oil,
red wine vinegar, onion, lots of garlic.

Jill




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Old 04-04-2006, 03:03 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default What to do with London Broil?



I have no idea why there is a near to 3 lb. London Broil (dated
recently) in my freezer, as I've never "owned" one before. I've looked
online for cooking suggestion, but have no way to barbeque or grill it.
There's only myself to feed here, so preparation suggestions, please?

PickyPuzzles


Do you have a broiler? Here's a recipe I've used for years. Sounds like
you need to cut the meat in thirds (for one hungry person) or invite
company.

Chris in Pearland, TX

* Exported from MasterCook II *

London Broil

Recipe By : Betty Crocker
Serving Size : 4 Preparation Time :0:45
Categories : Beef Broil Or Barbeque
Meat

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method
-------- ------------ --------------------------------
1 pound flank steak -- high quality
2 medium onions -- thinly sliced
1/4 teaspoon salt
1 tablespoon butter or margarine
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
1 teaspoon lemon juice
2 cloves garlic -- crushed
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper

Cut both sides of beef steak into diamond pattern 1/8 inch deep. Cook and
stir onions and 1/4 teaspoon salt until onions are tender; keep warm. Mix
remaining ingredients; brush half of the mixture on beef.

Set oven control to broil and/or 550 degrees. Broil beef with top 2 to 3
inches from heat until brown, about 5 minutes. Turn beef; brush with
remaining oil mixture and broil 5 minutes longer.

Cut beef across grain at slanted angle into thin slices; serve with onions.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

NOTES : Add a salad and a crusty loaf of Sourdough Bread.


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Old 04-04-2006, 04:22 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default What to do with London Broil?

PickyJaz wrote:
I have no idea why there is a near to 3 lb. London Broil (dated
recently) in my freezer, as I've never "owned" one before. I've looked
online for cooking suggestion, but have no way to barbeque or grill it.
There's only myself to feed here, so preparation suggestions, please?


Beef jerky! Stick the meat in the freezer until it gets frosty (makes
it easier to slice). Then slice it thin, marinate briefly in teriyaki
sauce then place on racks and dry in a barely warm oven.

Kathleen


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Old 04-04-2006, 04:46 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default What to do with London Broil?

On 3 Apr 2006 17:17:26 -0700, "PickyJaz" rummaged
among random neurons and opined:

I have no idea why there is a near to 3 lb. London Broil (dated
recently) in my freezer, as I've never "owned" one before. I've looked
online for cooking suggestion, but have no way to barbeque or grill it.
There's only myself to feed here, so preparation suggestions, please?


There's no such thing as a "London broil,' AFAICS, although plenty of
markets call lean, tough cuts of meat, such as flank steak, shoulder,
and round "London broil." A down and dirty recipe for any of these
tough cuts is to marinate it in a store bought Italian dressing, then
grill it, basting as it finishes.

Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd
AAC(F)BV66.0748.CA

"Most vigitaryans I iver see looked enough like their food to be
classed as cannybals."

Finley Peter Dunne (1900)

To reply, replace "spaminator" with "cox"
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Old 04-04-2006, 08:53 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default What to do with London Broil?


PickyJaz wrote:
I have no idea why there is a near to 3 lb. London Broil (dated
recently) in my freezer, as I've never "owned" one before. I've looked
online for cooking suggestion, but have no way to barbeque or grill it.
There's only myself to feed here, so preparation suggestions, please?


Cook's Illustrated, which arrived in the past few days, did an
extensive study of London Broil.

They said the marinade can be anything, but the cooking method is
crucial.

First, bring the meat to room temperature in a bag in a room-temp water
bath (works about ten times faster than just leaving it on the
counter).

Then cook it on the hot side of a two-level grill (just a grill with
most of the coals on one side), flipping it once per minute for four
minutes.

Then finish on the warm side until pink in the center.

According to their calculations, this produces a sear without producing
a large layer of well-done.

Then slice it ultra-thin, holding the blade of your slicer vertical but
cutting diagonal across the meat (i.e., from lower-right to upper-left
corner of your cutting board). I have no idea why the diagonal is
needed, and I've always thought using a bias plane rather than a
vertical one was important..but hey...he's Chris Kimball, and he's done
this a hundred times before writing the article (yeah right).

But the slices really were thin. Like roast beef. And pink inside
with a pretty sear outside. Looked tasty.

--Blair

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Old 04-04-2006, 08:56 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default What to do with London Broil?


Sheldon wrote:
Do you own a meat grinder, would make a lovely meat loaf.
You can also turn it into 3/8" dice for vegetable beef soup or
a great mushroom beef barley. Of course you can always
simply whack it into three 1 lb sections, marinate, and pan fry.


The words "whack" and "Sheldon" have a certain, I
dunno...soprano...tone to them...

--Blair



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Old 04-04-2006, 09:26 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default What to do with London Broil?

In article . com,
"Blair P. Houghton" wrote:


Cook's Illustrated, which arrived in the past few days, did an
extensive study of London Broil.

They said the marinade can be anything, but the cooking method is
crucial.

First, bring the meat to room temperature in a bag in a room-temp water
bath (works about ten times faster than just leaving it on the
counter).

Then cook it on the hot side of a two-level grill (just a grill with
most of the coals on one side), flipping it once per minute for four
minutes.

Then finish on the warm side until pink in the center.

According to their calculations, this produces a sear without producing
a large layer of well-done.

Then slice it ultra-thin, holding the blade of your slicer vertical but
cutting diagonal across the meat (i.e., from lower-right to upper-left
corner of your cutting board). I have no idea why the diagonal is
needed, and I've always thought using a bias plane rather than a
vertical one was important..but hey...he's Chris Kimball, and he's done
this a hundred times before writing the article (yeah right).

But the slices really were thin. Like roast beef. And pink inside
with a pretty sear outside. Looked tasty.



As others have posted, "London Broil" used to be flank steak. Now it is
often round steak, and rarely, sirloin. The grain on flank steak runs
parallel to the cutting board, and so should be cut like Chris says.
The grain in other steaks runs perpendicular to the cutting board, and
so should be cut as you said.

--
Dan Abel

Petaluma, California, USA
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Old 04-04-2006, 01:15 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default What to do with London Broil?


"Vanguard" wrote

The fancy name belies the quality of the cut. A non-description "london
broil" sounds better and sells more than if it were labelled "flank
steak". When users decided they didn't want MSG in their food or had a
preference that it wasn't there, the commercial producers then gave it
something like 28 names so they could hide that it was being used because
no consumer would know or remember all those names. Flank steak doesn't
have the appeal to the casual shopper as does london broil.


Flank steak sells quite well, what's packaged as londron broil
around here, long as I remember, is top round or something like
that. Most definitely not flank steak.

nancy


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Old 04-04-2006, 01:56 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default What to do with London Broil?

"Nancy Young" wrote in
:


"Vanguard" wrote

The fancy name belies the quality of the cut. A non-description
"london broil" sounds better and sells more than if it were labelled
"flank steak". When users decided they didn't want MSG in their food
or had a preference that it wasn't there, the commercial producers
then gave it something like 28 names so they could hide that it was
being used because no consumer would know or remember all those
names. Flank steak doesn't have the appeal to the casual shopper as
does london broil.


Flank steak sells quite well, what's packaged as londron broil
around here, long as I remember, is top round or something like
that. Most definitely not flank steak.

nancy



In my old Gourmet cookbook volumes, london broil called for flank steak
and a simple homemakde French dressing marinade, the likes of which
doesn't represent today's French dressing one bit. One trick the recipe
imparted was to lightly score around the edges of the steak to reduce
curling while on the bbq or under the broiler to medium-rare, resting
then slicing as thin as possible at about 45 degrees.

Top-round is usually stamped London Broil here too. To which I diamond
scrore on both sides, soak it for two days in Stubbs beef marinade
turning daily and bbq-ing or broiling to medium-rare. Resting and slicing
same as flank.

Imho,

Andy
Plus mashed or baked potatoes and asparagus
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Old 04-04-2006, 02:06 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default What to do with London Broil?


"Andy" q wrote

"Nancy Young" wrote


Flank steak sells quite well, what's packaged as londron broil
around here, long as I remember, is top round or something like
that. Most definitely not flank steak.


In my old Gourmet cookbook volumes, london broil called for flank steak
and a simple homemakde French dressing marinade, the likes of which
doesn't represent today's French dressing one bit. One trick the recipe
imparted was to lightly score around the edges of the steak to reduce
curling while on the bbq or under the broiler to medium-rare, resting
then slicing as thin as possible at about 45 degrees.


I do love flank steak, I have a recipe for a marinade in the rfc
cookbook that's how much I love it. Haven't had that in forever.

Top-round is usually stamped London Broil here too. To which I diamond
scrore on both sides, soak it for two days in Stubbs beef marinade
turning daily and bbq-ing or broiling to medium-rare. Resting and slicing
same as flank.


Thank you for the idea, I cannot recall the last time I made london
broil (not the flank steak london broil) ... I will be making that this
summer, I will look for the marinade just to try it. My ex used to
marinate it in italian dressing, I liked that.

nancy


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Old 04-04-2006, 02:30 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default What to do with London Broil?

"Nancy Young" wrote in
:


"Andy" q wrote

"Nancy Young" wrote


Flank steak sells quite well, what's packaged as londron broil
around here, long as I remember, is top round or something like
that. Most definitely not flank steak.


In my old Gourmet cookbook volumes, london broil called for flank
steak and a simple homemakde French dressing marinade, the likes of
which doesn't represent today's French dressing one bit. One trick
the recipe imparted was to lightly score around the edges of the
steak to reduce curling while on the bbq or under the broiler to
medium-rare, resting then slicing as thin as possible at about 45
degrees.


I do love flank steak, I have a recipe for a marinade in the rfc
cookbook that's how much I love it. Haven't had that in forever.

Top-round is usually stamped London Broil here too. To which I
diamond scrore on both sides, soak it for two days in Stubbs beef
marinade turning daily and bbq-ing or broiling to medium-rare.
Resting and slicing same as flank.


Thank you for the idea, I cannot recall the last time I made london
broil (not the flank steak london broil) ... I will be making that
this summer, I will look for the marinade just to try it. My ex used
to marinate it in italian dressing, I liked that.

nancy



Last year I actually jumped ship from flank and top-round to skirt steak
once I found a steady supply. More flavorful than flank (cut from the
same area of the cow) It's better known for fajitas but it's steak in my
book.

Andy
Sadly beef-free since Feb. 2006 when my bloodwork numbers rolled in.
*sigh*



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