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Old 03-02-2019, 09:23 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default what's with peanuts?


I jes watched this program, on Youtube.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=phit6HSJqZc

What's up with that? I've been eating peanuts since I was jes a wee
tad. I think my grandparents jes put 'em out as a diversion fer candy,
which they seldom had.... well "hard candy" in the "proper" living room
which we seldom ventured into.

Regardless, I'm a confirmed "peanut junkie". I seldom eat 'em anymore,
but love peanut-buttter, raw peanuts, salted, etc.

What about you?

nb


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Old 03-02-2019, 09:33 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default what's with peanuts?

On 2/3/2019 4:23 PM, notbob wrote:

I jes watched this program, on Youtube.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=phit6HSJqZc

What's up with that?¬* I've been eating peanuts since I was jes a wee
tad.¬* I think my grandparents jes put 'em out as a diversion fer candy,
which they seldom had.... well "hard candy" in the "proper" living room
which we seldom ventured into.

Regardless, I'm a confirmed "peanut junkie".¬* I seldom eat 'em anymore,
but love peanut-buttter, raw peanuts, salted, etc.

What about you?¬*

nb

I think parents are trying to make a sterile environment and it is
hurting, not helping kids. I started eating peanuts and peanut butter
at an early age and still have it a couple of times a week. We also
played in dirt, shared a popsicle and sodas. Makes for healthy kids.
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Old 04-02-2019, 12:01 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default what's with peanuts?

On Sun, 3 Feb 2019 14:23:40 -0700, notbob wrote:

I jes watched this program, on Youtube.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=phit6HSJqZc

What's up with that?


No doubt some sort of kook shit I don't want nor need to watch.

-sw
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Old 04-02-2019, 02:50 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default what's with peanuts?

notbob wrote:
....
What about you?


i eat a lot of peanut butter.

legumes and nuts from trees are a large
part of my diet that i would really miss
if i had to change.

we've had severe cold weather and now it
is warm again and yesterday i was sorely
tempted by some black walnut ice-cream -
i held out, but barely...


songbird
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Old 04-02-2019, 06:58 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default what's with peanuts?


"notbob" wrote in message
...

I jes watched this program, on Youtube.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=phit6HSJqZc

What's up with that? I've been eating peanuts since I was jes a wee tad.
I think my grandparents jes put 'em out as a diversion fer candy, which
they seldom had.... well "hard candy" in the "proper" living room which we
seldom ventured into.

Regardless, I'm a confirmed "peanut junkie". I seldom eat 'em anymore,
but love peanut-buttter, raw peanuts, salted, etc.

What about you?


I was thinking about this earlier as I finished off the dregs of a giant can
of Cocktail peanuts. I used to love them and it was my job to put them out
for company. Used to be all the oil traveled to the bottom so when you
turned the can upside down, you had to blot the excess oil off.

Excess oil is no longer the case and the peanuts don't seem as tasty to me.
Now I like Redskins better. I keep searching for good peanuts otherwise but
not finding them. The worst to me are the blister fried ones. Ick.



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Old 04-02-2019, 11:09 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default what's with peanuts?

On Sunday, February 3, 2019 at 4:23:46 PM UTC-5, notbob wrote:
I jes watched this program, on Youtube.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=phit6HSJqZc

What's up with that? I've been eating peanuts since I was jes a wee
tad. I think my grandparents jes put 'em out as a diversion fer candy,
which they seldom had.... well "hard candy" in the "proper" living room
which we seldom ventured into.

Regardless, I'm a confirmed "peanut junkie". I seldom eat 'em anymore,
but love peanut-buttter, raw peanuts, salted, etc.

What about you?


I'm not crazy about peanuts. Once in a great while I have peanut butter
on crackers for a snack (if I'm out of hummus).

Cindy Hamilton
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Old 04-02-2019, 02:07 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default what's with peanuts?

I doubt many eat more peanut butter than I do.
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Old 06-02-2019, 09:45 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default what's with peanuts?

On 2/3/2019 4:23 PM, notbob wrote:

I jes watched this program, on Youtube.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=phit6HSJqZc

What's up with that?¬* I've been eating peanuts since I was jes a wee
tad.¬* I think my grandparents jes put 'em out as a diversion fer candy,
which they seldom had.... well "hard candy" in the "proper" living room
which we seldom ventured into.

Regardless, I'm a confirmed "peanut junkie".¬* I seldom eat 'em anymore,
but love peanut-buttter, raw peanuts, salted, etc.

What about you?¬*

nb

Beats me. When I was a kid nearly everyone brought a PB or PB&J
sandwich for lunch. As a military brat, we moved a lot so I went to a
lot of different schools. I never saw a classmate break out in hives
for any reason, much less due to contact with a peanut.

I love to snack on dry roasted lightly salted peanuts. I like the
Publix brand natural PB (no added sugar) on toast for breakfast once in
a while. Peanut butter cookies are tasty, too. I even like boiled
green peanuts as a snack from time to time.

Jill
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Old 10-02-2019, 10:23 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Pamela wrote:

A friend in Texas repeatedly raves about deep-frying a whole turkey in
peanut oil for Thanksgiving.


I had one once at a friends house. It was an interesting
experiment but nothing more. The turkey itself was very tasty and
not greasy at all. You can't stuff the turkey though as that
would be grease city.

The peanut oil has no perceptable flavor...it just has a high
smoke point so is often favored for frying various foods.

Maybe it's a southern thing.


Not a southern thing...It was just a short lived fad maybe 15
years ago. Do it once and not worth a repeat, imo. An oven
roasted turkey packed full of stuffing is more the Southern
tradition, imo. At least it is in my area.

With me at least, one of the nice things about a thanksgiving or
Christmas turkey dinner is the nice smells in your house all day
as it cooks. With the deep-fryed outside in the yard, you lose
that.
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Old 10-02-2019, 02:39 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default what's with peanuts?

On 2019-02-10 5:23 a.m., Gary wrote:
Pamela wrote:

A friend in Texas repeatedly raves about deep-frying a whole turkey in
peanut oil for Thanksgiving.


I had one once at a friends house. It was an interesting
experiment but nothing more. The turkey itself was very tasty and
not greasy at all. You can't stuff the turkey though as that
would be grease city.

The peanut oil has no perceptable flavor...it just has a high
smoke point so is often favored for frying various foods.

Maybe it's a southern thing.


Not a southern thing...It was just a short lived fad maybe 15
years ago. Do it once and not worth a repeat, imo. An oven
roasted turkey packed full of stuffing is more the Southern
tradition, imo. At least it is in my area.

With me at least, one of the nice things about a thanksgiving or
Christmas turkey dinner is the nice smells in your house all day
as it cooks. With the deep-fryed outside in the yard, you lose
that.


I have had it and it was okay. Not worth going out and buying the
equipment. The whole process scares me. I don't like the idea of
dropping something that big into a pot of hot oil over an open flame. It
is an accident waiting to happen. It doesn't help that the cooks are
usually half in the bag when they do it.




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Old 10-02-2019, 04:37 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default what's with peanuts?

On 2/10/2019 9:39 AM, Dave Smith wrote:
On 2019-02-10 5:23 a.m., Gary wrote:
Pamela wrote:

A friend in Texas repeatedly raves about deep-frying a whole turkey in
peanut oil for Thanksgiving.


I had one once at a friends house. It was an interesting
experiment but nothing more. The turkey itself was very tasty and
not greasy at all. You can't stuff the turkey though as that
would be grease city.

The peanut oil has no perceptable flavor...it just has a high
smoke point so is often favored for frying various foods.

Maybe it's a southern thing.


Not a southern thing...It was just a short lived fad maybe 15
years ago. Do it once and not worth a repeat, imo. An oven
roasted turkey packed full of stuffing is more the Southern
tradition, imo. At least it is in my area.¬*

With me at least, one of the nice things about a thanksgiving or
Christmas turkey dinner is the nice smells in your house all day
as it cooks. With the deep-fryed outside in the yard, you lose
that.


I have had it¬* and it was okay. Not worth going out and buying the
equipment. The whole process scares me. I don't like the idea of
dropping something that big into a pot of hot oil over an open flame. It
is an accident waiting to happen. It doesn't help that the cooks are
usually half in the bag when they do it.


There's (allegedly) a method to not setting your house on fire if you're
going to deep fry a turkey. First rule is, you fill the fryer or a same
size deep pot with water to where you think the oil should be. Then you
immerse the turkey or something the same size and weight as the turkey
and see how much liquid splashes out. If it splashes out, oh boy,
you're probably going to catch your house on fire. Even if not, you'll
have a huge mess of wasted oil to clean up.

Jill ---not interested in deep fried turkey
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Old 10-02-2019, 05:07 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On Sun, 10 Feb 2019 11:37:55 -0500, jmcquown
wrote:

On 2/10/2019 9:39 AM, Dave Smith wrote:
On 2019-02-10 5:23 a.m., Gary wrote:
Pamela wrote:

A friend in Texas repeatedly raves about deep-frying a whole turkey in
peanut oil for Thanksgiving.

I had one once at a friends house. It was an interesting
experiment but nothing more. The turkey itself was very tasty and
not greasy at all. You can't stuff the turkey though as that
would be grease city.

The peanut oil has no perceptable flavor...it just has a high
smoke point so is often favored for frying various foods.

Maybe it's a southern thing.

Not a southern thing...It was just a short lived fad maybe 15
years ago. Do it once and not worth a repeat, imo. An oven
roasted turkey packed full of stuffing is more the Southern
tradition, imo. At least it is in my area.*

With me at least, one of the nice things about a thanksgiving or
Christmas turkey dinner is the nice smells in your house all day
as it cooks. With the deep-fryed outside in the yard, you lose
that.


I have had it* and it was okay. Not worth going out and buying the
equipment. The whole process scares me. I don't like the idea of
dropping something that big into a pot of hot oil over an open flame. It
is an accident waiting to happen. It doesn't help that the cooks are
usually half in the bag when they do it.


There's (allegedly) a method to not setting your house on fire if you're
going to deep fry a turkey. First rule is, you fill the fryer or a same
size deep pot with water to where you think the oil should be. Then you
immerse the turkey or something the same size and weight as the turkey
and see how much liquid splashes out. If it splashes out, oh boy,
you're probably going to catch your house on fire. Even if not, you'll
have a huge mess of wasted oil to clean up.

Jill ---not interested in deep fried turkey


Not interested in deep fried turkey either, however if I were, for
safety I'd quarter the turkey and then depending on the size of the
turkey I'd cook one or two parts at a time.
With a large roasting chicken I quarter it and roast it in a pan, most
times I portion it in eights... much easier method to serve a hot from
the oven roasted chicken. Sometimes the portioned chicken is placed
on a bed of veggies; spuds, celery, carrots, etc... saves having to
scrub a rack. It's been many years since I roasted a chicken whole. I
like to remove the backbone anyway, don't need spinal fluid flavoring.
I like to remove the rib bones too, easy to pull out cleanly with a
paper towel.

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Old 10-02-2019, 06:16 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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jmcquown wrote:

There's (allegedly) a method to not setting your house on fire if you're
going to deep fry a turkey. First rule is, you fill the fryer or a same
size deep pot with water to where you think the oil should be. Then you
immerse the turkey or something the same size and weight as the turkey
and see how much liquid splashes out. If it splashes out, oh boy,
you're probably going to catch your house on fire. Even if not, you'll
have a huge mess of wasted oil to clean up.


Well, I was there that one day so I do know.
You start with a HUGE NAVY pot like Sheldon has. One that will
easily fit a large turkey with plenty of room to spare.

You put your turkey in the pot, then fill it with water up to
desired level at least 2-3" over the turkey and still leaving
several inches of air space over top of the liquid.

Then you remove the turkey, and dry it off inside and out.

Measure the water left in the pot and that's how much oil you
put in to cook the turkey.

Take that pot and the gas burner way out in the back yard well
away from the house then turn it on and bring the oil up to the
proper temperature. When ready to add the turkey, it must be
lowered VERY SLOWLY into the hot oil otherwise it will bubble
over and start a fire.

It took us about 2 minutes to slowly lower the turkey in. Once
in, it only took about 40 minutes to cook the giant turkey.

And as I said, very delicious turkey and not oily at all but I
missed the inside oven roasting smell plus that pan stuffing they
made really sucked.



Jill ---not interested in deep fried turkey

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Old 10-02-2019, 07:04 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On 2/10/2019 11:37 AM, jmcquown wrote:


Not a southern thing...It was just a short lived fad maybe 15
years ago. Do it once and not worth a repeat, imo. An oven
roasted turkey packed full of stuffing is more the Southern
tradition, imo. At least it is in my area.¬*

With me at least, one of the nice things about a thanksgiving or
Christmas turkey dinner is the nice smells in your house all day
as it cooks. With the deep-fryed outside in the yard, you lose
that.


I have had it¬* and it was okay. Not worth going out and buying the
equipment. The whole process scares me. I don't like the idea of
dropping something that big into a pot of hot oil over an open flame.
It is an accident waiting to happen. It doesn't help that the cooks
are usually half in the bag when they do it.


There's (allegedly) a method to not setting your house on fire if you're
going to deep fry a turkey.¬* First rule is, you fill the fryer or a same
size deep pot with water to where you think the oil should be.¬* Then you
immerse the turkey or something the same size and weight as the turkey
and see how much liquid splashes out.¬* If it splashes out, oh boy,
you're probably going to catch your house on fire.¬* Even if not, you'll
have a huge mess of wasted oil to clean up.

Jill ---not interested in deep fried turkey


I've done it twice. Good, but a lot of work and oil. I had the pot and
burner out on the lawn.


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