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Old 27-11-2009, 03:21 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Jill, thanks for the cauliflower recipe

I made your cauliflower au gratin on Wednesday, into the fridge
overnight and reheated it yesterday to raves. Excellent recipe,
particularly the stiff sauce which bound deliciously to the little
florets and kept them moist and tasty through what in effect
was a double cooking. I found orange cauliflower at the local
Publix and used that; very subtle but distinct flavor difference,
a touch sweeter and more full flavored. We all appreciated your
having posted it.

pavane



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Old 27-11-2009, 04:15 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Jill, thanks for the cauliflower recipe

On Nov 27, 10:21*am, "pavane" wrote:
I made your cauliflower au gratin on Wednesday, into the fridge
overnight and reheated it yesterday to raves. *Excellent recipe,
particularly the stiff sauce which bound deliciously to the little
florets and kept them moist and tasty through what in effect
was a double cooking. *I found orange cauliflower at the local
Publix and used that; very subtle but distinct flavor difference,
a touch sweeter and more full flavored. We all appreciated your
having posted it.

pavane


This is more a hijack than comment. Your recipe looked so good that I
put the ingredients on
a grocery list. DH didn't know what Gruyere cheese was, and tried 4
groceries before he found
it. Then because there was no price listed where he found the cheese,
he decided to get 2 so we'd have
it on hand. What a shock to him at the register - $16. per pound. He
did get both 8 oz pieces. Bless
him, he's so good with a grocery list. Always comes home with the
bacon, er, um, cheese.
We haven't tried the casserole yet, but it will happen this weekend!!!
Glad it was so good Pavane, and thanks Jill for posting it.
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Old 27-11-2009, 04:27 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Jill, thanks for the cauliflower recipe

pavane wrote:

I made your cauliflower au gratin on Wednesday, into the fridge
overnight and reheated it yesterday to raves. Excellent recipe,
particularly the stiff sauce which bound deliciously to the little
florets and kept them moist and tasty through what in effect
was a double cooking. I found orange cauliflower at the local
Publix and used that; very subtle but distinct flavor difference,
a touch sweeter and more full flavored. We all appreciated your
having posted it.


Yes, that's a very good recipe, and almost identical to the one Mom uses to
do now and then. Cauliflowers have always been a sad food to me but with
that recipe they turn into something really wonderful. And when we're going
to have just the gratin for a meal, Mom adds some roughly shredded sausage,
after having partly cooked them apart.
--
Vilco
Think pink, drink rosŤ



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Old 28-11-2009, 09:47 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Jill, thanks for the cauliflower recipe

"pavane" wrote in message
...
I made your cauliflower au gratin on Wednesday, into the fridge
overnight and reheated it yesterday to raves. Excellent recipe,
particularly the stiff sauce which bound deliciously to the little
florets and kept them moist and tasty through what in effect
was a double cooking. I found orange cauliflower at the local
Publix and used that; very subtle but distinct flavor difference,
a touch sweeter and more full flavored. We all appreciated your
having posted it.

pavane



You're quite welcome! I combined cauliflower with broccoli florets this
time (another poster mentioned that). I've had that recipe for years; it's
also been years since I made it

Jill

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Old 28-11-2009, 10:13 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Jill, thanks for the cauliflower recipe


"jmcquown" wrote in message
...
"pavane" wrote in message
...
I made your cauliflower au gratin on Wednesday, into the fridge
overnight and reheated it yesterday to raves. Excellent recipe,
particularly the stiff sauce which bound deliciously to the little
florets and kept them moist and tasty through what in effect
was a double cooking. I found orange cauliflower at the local
Publix and used that; very subtle but distinct flavor difference,
a touch sweeter and more full flavored. We all appreciated your
having posted it.

pavane



You're quite welcome! I combined cauliflower with broccoli florets this
time (another poster mentioned that). I've had that recipe for years;
it's also been years since I made it


I made it yesterday. I picked up a HUGE head of cauliflower on Wednesday
but didn't need it for TG dinner and when I saw the recipe, saved it. I had
to sub the cheese, though.



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Old 28-11-2009, 10:51 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Jill, thanks for the cauliflower recipe

"jmcquown" wrote in
:



You're quite welcome! I combined cauliflower with broccoli florets this
time (another poster mentioned that). I've had that recipe for years;
it's also been years since I made it

Jill





Cauliflower Gratin?? Rather pedestrian fare around here.


But good to see you're 'living on the edge' and using broccoli with it as
well.


IIRC... about 14 years ago, on the one and only time that we've every
bought a turkey..... I had to make a turkey and broccoli "gratin" with the
plethora of turkey leftovers, but over here, and it seems over there, it's
really called a *Mornay*.

A white cheese sauce over leftover meat/veges.

My pooch likes it. The SO and myself, no so much.

--
Peter Lucas
Brisbane
Australia


If we are not meant to eat animals,
why are they made of meat?
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Old 28-11-2009, 11:59 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Jill, thanks for the cauliflower recipe

jmcquown wrote:
"pavane" wrote in message
...
I made your cauliflower au gratin on Wednesday, into the fridge
overnight and reheated it yesterday to raves. Excellent recipe,
particularly the stiff sauce which bound deliciously to the little
florets and kept them moist and tasty through what in effect
was a double cooking. I found orange cauliflower at the local
Publix and used that; very subtle but distinct flavor difference,
a touch sweeter and more full flavored. We all appreciated your
having posted it.

pavane



You're quite welcome! I combined cauliflower with broccoli florets this
time (another poster mentioned that). I've had that recipe for years;
it's also been years since I made it

Jill


I'll bet your septic tank hasn't see that much action in decades! Nice!

Rob
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Old 30-11-2009, 09:19 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Jill, thanks for the cauliflower recipe

PeterL wrote:

IIRC... about 14 years ago, on the one and only time that we've every
bought a turkey..... I had to make a turkey and broccoli "gratin"
with the plethora of turkey leftovers, but over here, and it seems
over there, it's really called a *Mornay*.

A white cheese sauce over leftover meat/veges.


On this NG I learned that Mornay auce is essentially a bechamel sauce with
some added cheese, wherever you put it.
--
Vilco
Think pink, drink rosŤ



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Old 30-11-2009, 04:40 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Jill, thanks for the cauliflower recipe

"ViLco" wrote in -
september.org:

PeterL wrote:

IIRC... about 14 years ago, on the one and only time that we've every
bought a turkey..... I had to make a turkey and broccoli "gratin"
with the plethora of turkey leftovers, but over here, and it seems
over there, it's really called a *Mornay*.

A white cheese sauce over leftover meat/veges.


On this NG I learned that Mornay auce is essentially a bechamel sauce

with
some added cheese, wherever you put it.




Seems there's quite a few words for the one 'evil' :-)



Mornay is for family and friends.

Bechamel is for trying to impress the neighbours.

Au Gratin is for when you're trying to kiss your bosses arse.



--
Peter Lucas
Brisbane
Australia


If we are not meant to eat animals,
why are they made of meat?
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Old 30-11-2009, 08:22 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Jill, thanks for the cauliflower recipe



ViLco wrote:
PeterL wrote:


IIRC... about 14 years ago, on the one and only time that we've every
bought a turkey..... I had to make a turkey and broccoli "gratin"
with the plethora of turkey leftovers, but over here, and it seems
over there, it's really called a *Mornay*.

A white cheese sauce over leftover meat/veges.



On this NG I learned that Mornay sauce is essentially a bechamel sauce with
some added cheese, wherever you put it.


Yes but how many people think a bechamel is just a 'white sauce' butter,
flour and liquid?

And of course a cordon bleu Mornay sauce will be made with the cooking
liquid of the food it is to be served with, fish stock if serving it
over fish and "when mornay sauce is required for dishes other than for
fish, the preparation is the same except that the fish cooking liquor is
replaced by cooking liquor from the dish under preparation or milk as
the case may be."
--
Mr. Joseph Littleshoes Esq.

Domine, dirige nos.
Let the games begin!
http://fredeeky.typepad.com/fredeeky.../sf_anthem.mp3



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Old 30-11-2009, 09:37 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Jill, thanks for the cauliflower recipe

PeterL wrote:

Seems there's quite a few words for the one 'evil' :-)

Mornay is for family and friends.

Bechamel is for trying to impress the neighbours.

Au Gratin is for when you're trying to kiss your bosses arse.


Well, I just call it cheese sauce. What does that make me? G
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Old 30-11-2009, 10:00 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Jill, thanks for the cauliflower recipe

In article ,
"Dora" wrote:

PeterL wrote:

Seems there's quite a few words for the one 'evil' :-)

Mornay is for family and friends.

Bechamel is for trying to impress the neighbours.

Au Gratin is for when you're trying to kiss your bosses arse.


Well, I just call it cheese sauce. What does that make me? G


Not much of a Francophile?

--
Dan Abel
Petaluma, California USA

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Old 30-11-2009, 11:40 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Jill, thanks for the cauliflower recipe

"Dora" wrote in :

PeterL wrote:

Seems there's quite a few words for the one 'evil' :-)

Mornay is for family and friends.

Bechamel is for trying to impress the neighbours.

Au Gratin is for when you're trying to kiss your bosses arse.


Well, I just call it cheese sauce. What does that make me? G




Normal :-)



--
Peter Lucas
Brisbane
Australia


If we are not meant to eat animals,
why are they made of meat?
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Old 01-12-2009, 11:00 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Jill, thanks for the cauliflower recipe

Mr. Joseph Littleshoes Esq. wrote:

On this NG I learned that Mornay sauce is essentially a bechamel
sauce with some added cheese, wherever you put it.


Yes but how many people think a bechamel is just a 'white sauce'
butter, flour and liquid?


Very many people and they are right, because bechamel is just butter, flour
and milk.
And Mornay sauce is bechamel plus cheese and, as I discover today, egg yolk.
Then one can shove anything in theyr sauces and call them as one likes, but
bechamel IS just a sauce (mine is not white) with milk and roux.
--
Vilco
Think pink, drink rosŤ



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Old 01-12-2009, 12:06 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Jill, thanks for the cauliflower recipe


"Dora" wrote in message
...
PeterL wrote:

Seems there's quite a few words for the one 'evil' :-)

Mornay is for family and friends.

Bechamel is for trying to impress the neighbours.

Au Gratin is for when you're trying to kiss your bosses arse.


Well, I just call it cheese sauce. What does that make me? G


Non pretentious?




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