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  #136 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 12-09-2011, 05:37 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Default Swedish Hospital Cherry Hill Food

On 9/6/2011 5:18 PM, Julie Bove wrote:
"W. wrote in message
...

[snip]
I don't have a lot of experience with strokes. They say my MIL has had two
that went undiagnosed. We don't know when she had them. She has trouble
with speech and motor coordination. Can not walk at all and can't control
her arms and hands any more. At times her head shakes. But she does have
additional medical problems such as a form of palsy. Her mind though seems
to be tracking well most of the time.


Then you may want to visit this website:

http://www.strokeboard.net/index.php

They have a section for stroke survivors and also one for stroke
caregivers. I don't recall if they also have one for other
relatives of stroke victims.

I've had too much experience with strokes. My mother had several
mini-strokes before she died, and I've had a stroke myself.

There's a significant variety in the effects of strokes, depending
on what part of the brain was affected.


  #137 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 12-09-2011, 05:40 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Default Swedish Hospital Cherry Hill Food

On 9/11/2011 11:27 PM, Julie Bove wrote:
"Robert wrote in message
.com...
On 9/6/2011 11:45 AM, Julie Bove wrote:
"W. wrote in message
...
Julie wrote:

: wrote in message
: ...
: you need to discuss this with the doc without them around, i really
hate
: saying that but if you want them healthy, and if you want to not be
blamed
: for a health issue not of your making you are going to have to get
some
: rules set out, Lee

: Alas I have not seen a Dr. when I was visiting.

GEt a name and phone number and contact hir if your Mom is not fully
able
to get instructions or infomtion clear.

I'm not sure they could talk to me with the HIPAA laws being what they
are.


You could at least ask the doctor how much talking is allowed.

For example, can you say what you want to the doctor, even if
the doctor isn't allowed to reply?


My dad is home now. Has been for days.


So I don't need to respond as much while reading the rest of
this thread.

How's he doing? Improved enough that your mother can handle
what he can't?

  #138 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 12-09-2011, 05:44 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Default Swedish Hospital Cherry Hill Food

On 9/7/2011 2:39 AM, Julie Bove wrote:
wrote in message
...
I couldn't agree more, and what they simply MUST understand, is that once
socail services gets into it, finding him not clean/fed or whatever its
really downhill fom there, even if the day they find it is the first day
your mom just needed an extra hour of sleep and hadn't gotten him cleaned
up yet, Lee


He is perfectly capable of washing, dressing and even fixing his own food.
It's getting the food into the house that's going to be the problem. They
don't like to keep much food in the house. I've had trouble with them in
the winter. Can't get them to see that they really must have food in the
house in case they get snowed in. They have gotten snowed in and had to eat
oatmeal day after day because they had nothing else.

They are both very stubborn though. And had I brought them a few bags of
food they would have just given it away. And no doubt it would have been
the wrong food for them. I had offered them the coupon I had for free eggs
and was told they would only eat one kind of eggs. And they are very brand
loyal. They don't necessarily eat organic food but they will not eat
anything they deem to be of low quality. Frankly some of what they do it is
IMO not high quality or healthy food. I just know I would not win if I
tried to bring them food.


Have you thought of asking then what brands, and what varieties of
those brands, they want, so that you can make sure you only bring
them what they'll eat?
  #139 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 12-09-2011, 05:58 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Posts: 44,910
Default Swedish Hospital Cherry Hill Food


"Robert Miles" wrote in message
.com...
On 9/6/2011 5:18 PM, Julie Bove wrote:
"W. wrote in message
...

[snip]
I don't have a lot of experience with strokes. They say my MIL has had
two
that went undiagnosed. We don't know when she had them. She has trouble
with speech and motor coordination. Can not walk at all and can't
control
her arms and hands any more. At times her head shakes. But she does
have
additional medical problems such as a form of palsy. Her mind though
seems
to be tracking well most of the time.


Then you may want to visit this website:

http://www.strokeboard.net/index.php

They have a section for stroke survivors and also one for stroke
caregivers. I don't recall if they also have one for other
relatives of stroke victims.

I've had too much experience with strokes. My mother had several
mini-strokes before she died, and I've had a stroke myself.

There's a significant variety in the effects of strokes, depending
on what part of the brain was affected.


I know that.


  #140 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 12-09-2011, 05:59 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 44,910
Default Swedish Hospital Cherry Hill Food


"Robert Miles" wrote in message
.com...
On 9/11/2011 11:27 PM, Julie Bove wrote:
"Robert wrote in message
.com...
On 9/6/2011 11:45 AM, Julie Bove wrote:
"W. wrote in message
...
Julie wrote:

: wrote in message
: ...
: you need to discuss this with the doc without them around, i
really
hate
: saying that but if you want them healthy, and if you want to not
be
blamed
: for a health issue not of your making you are going to have to
get
some
: rules set out, Lee

: Alas I have not seen a Dr. when I was visiting.

GEt a name and phone number and contact hir if your Mom is not fully
able
to get instructions or infomtion clear.

I'm not sure they could talk to me with the HIPAA laws being what they
are.

You could at least ask the doctor how much talking is allowed.

For example, can you say what you want to the doctor, even if
the doctor isn't allowed to reply?


My dad is home now. Has been for days.


So I don't need to respond as much while reading the rest of
this thread.

How's he doing? Improved enough that your mother can handle
what he can't?


The only thing that was affected was his memory. But give his ADHD and
hearing loss it is difficult to sort out what he can't remember or didn't
hear or wasn't paying attention to. He's not really *that* much different
than before.




  #141 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 12-09-2011, 06:07 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Posts: 44,910
Default Swedish Hospital Cherry Hill Food


"Robert Miles" wrote in message
.com...
On 9/7/2011 2:39 AM, Julie Bove wrote:
wrote in message
...
I couldn't agree more, and what they simply MUST understand, is that
once
socail services gets into it, finding him not clean/fed or whatever its
really downhill fom there, even if the day they find it is the first day
your mom just needed an extra hour of sleep and hadn't gotten him
cleaned
up yet, Lee


He is perfectly capable of washing, dressing and even fixing his own
food.
It's getting the food into the house that's going to be the problem.
They
don't like to keep much food in the house. I've had trouble with them in
the winter. Can't get them to see that they really must have food in the
house in case they get snowed in. They have gotten snowed in and had to
eat
oatmeal day after day because they had nothing else.

They are both very stubborn though. And had I brought them a few bags of
food they would have just given it away. And no doubt it would have been
the wrong food for them. I had offered them the coupon I had for free
eggs
and was told they would only eat one kind of eggs. And they are very
brand
loyal. They don't necessarily eat organic food but they will not eat
anything they deem to be of low quality. Frankly some of what they do it
is
IMO not high quality or healthy food. I just know I would not win if I
tried to bring them food.


Have you thought of asking then what brands, and what varieties of
those brands, they want, so that you can make sure you only bring
them what they'll eat?


That's what I did. But the problem is that my mom doesn't want to keep any
extra food in the house. I find it is far too expensive to shop the way she
wants me to. There is no way I could do that for myself. For instance,
they had a sale where if you bought any 3 Jell-O products you would get a
Catalina coupon for $2.00 of your next order. She only wanted 2 items. I
convinced her it would be better to get 3. The clerk allowed me to use the
coupon for my order. I then just had her pay me $2 less.

Today at Costco, Angela found that the Kirkland brand flushable wipes got
you almost twice as many wipes as the Cottonelle kind. We personally have
no issues with Kirkland brand and would have bought them. But when I called
my mom she sounded fearful of them and told me to buy the other brand.

I also found coupons in today's paper for some things that we bought
yesterday for her. I try to buy things that are on sale and if possible to
also use a coupon for them. I also stock up on things like pasta, cereal
and canned goods so that I am not constantly having to go to the store for
them. But I can't convince her to do this.

I did buy her the big box of sugar free Fudgesicles because they were on
sale and the small box was not.

I do understand part of why she is doing what she is doing. She wants to
have a limited amount of food in the house so they won't be tempted to
overeat. But... That just isn't feasible right now. I think they need to
stock up on staples.


  #142 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 12-09-2011, 10:42 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 894
Default Swedish Hospital Cherry Hill Food

On Sun, 11 Sep 2011 21:27:27 -0700, "Julie Bove"
wrote:


"Robert Miles" wrote in message
s.com...
On 9/5/2011 11:30 PM, Julie Bove wrote:
wrote in message
...
Given the relationship between Julie and her parents I would be inclined
to start as I mean to go on. As you say, letting them know up front what
you are willing/capable of doing. Not everyone has the ability to look
after aging parents. Just before my mum went into a home I had two young
babies. It was very stressful despite the fact that we had always got on
well.

Angela and I have both suggested two facilities that we found for seniors
but they were totally unwilling to even consider it. My mom however has
mentioned that she might have to put my dad in a home. But she is very
much
in denial about herself.


Have you asked her to consider staying in the home for as long as your
father is there? That should at least allow her to get used to it
before she needs to make a final decision about whether to stay there.


No. Why would I mention that? She knows she *might* be able to do that.
Or might not. Most likely not. Depends on if their insurance would pay.
We just went through this with my SIL's dad. He should really be in a home.
But he is refusing. When his wife was in there they tried to talk him into
going to help care for her. He is totally senile but he does seem to think
that he is helping her. There was no way. Their insurance wouldn't pay for
it and they don't have the money to do it.



Dear Julie,

I cared for my mother in law almost till she died, and she had
alzheimers disease. They never want to leave their familiar
surroundings. It is very difficult. I hope you find workable
solutions.

Evelyn
  #143 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 12-09-2011, 02:56 PM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Posts: 44,910
Default Swedish Hospital Cherry Hill Food


"Evelyn" wrote in message
...
On Sun, 11 Sep 2011 21:27:27 -0700, "Julie Bove"
wrote:


"Robert Miles" wrote in message
ws.com...
On 9/5/2011 11:30 PM, Julie Bove wrote:
wrote in message
...
Given the relationship between Julie and her parents I would be
inclined
to start as I mean to go on. As you say, letting them know up front
what
you are willing/capable of doing. Not everyone has the ability to look
after aging parents. Just before my mum went into a home I had two
young
babies. It was very stressful despite the fact that we had always got
on
well.

Angela and I have both suggested two facilities that we found for
seniors
but they were totally unwilling to even consider it. My mom however
has
mentioned that she might have to put my dad in a home. But she is very
much
in denial about herself.

Have you asked her to consider staying in the home for as long as your
father is there? That should at least allow her to get used to it
before she needs to make a final decision about whether to stay there.


No. Why would I mention that? She knows she *might* be able to do that.
Or might not. Most likely not. Depends on if their insurance would pay.
We just went through this with my SIL's dad. He should really be in a
home.
But he is refusing. When his wife was in there they tried to talk him
into
going to help care for her. He is totally senile but he does seem to
think
that he is helping her. There was no way. Their insurance wouldn't pay
for
it and they don't have the money to do it.



Dear Julie,

I cared for my mother in law almost till she died, and she had
alzheimers disease. They never want to leave their familiar
surroundings. It is very difficult. I hope you find workable
solutions.


Thankfully I'm not involved in that one. But he does want to leave and that
is a problem. He will get in his car and drive somewhere. And then they
have to go find him.


  #144 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 12-09-2011, 03:53 PM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Posts: 894
Default Swedish Hospital Cherry Hill Food

On Mon, 12 Sep 2011 06:56:51 -0700, "Julie Bove"
wrote:


"Evelyn" wrote in message
.. .
On Sun, 11 Sep 2011 21:27:27 -0700, "Julie Bove"
wrote:


"Robert Miles" wrote in message
ews.com...
On 9/5/2011 11:30 PM, Julie Bove wrote:
wrote in message
...
Given the relationship between Julie and her parents I would be
inclined
to start as I mean to go on. As you say, letting them know up front
what
you are willing/capable of doing. Not everyone has the ability to look
after aging parents. Just before my mum went into a home I had two
young
babies. It was very stressful despite the fact that we had always got
on
well.

Angela and I have both suggested two facilities that we found for
seniors
but they were totally unwilling to even consider it. My mom however
has
mentioned that she might have to put my dad in a home. But she is very
much
in denial about herself.

Have you asked her to consider staying in the home for as long as your
father is there? That should at least allow her to get used to it
before she needs to make a final decision about whether to stay there.

No. Why would I mention that? She knows she *might* be able to do that.
Or might not. Most likely not. Depends on if their insurance would pay.
We just went through this with my SIL's dad. He should really be in a
home.
But he is refusing. When his wife was in there they tried to talk him
into
going to help care for her. He is totally senile but he does seem to
think
that he is helping her. There was no way. Their insurance wouldn't pay
for
it and they don't have the money to do it.



Dear Julie,

I cared for my mother in law almost till she died, and she had
alzheimers disease. They never want to leave their familiar
surroundings. It is very difficult. I hope you find workable
solutions.


Thankfully I'm not involved in that one. But he does want to leave and that
is a problem. He will get in his car and drive somewhere. And then they
have to go find him.



On the newsgroup alt.support.alzheimers we encountered a lot of that.
The only way was to disable the car somehow. Yes, it is extremely
difficult. Thankfully, my 98 year old father quit driving on his
own. I have no idea how we would have dealt with that.

Evelyn
  #145 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 12-09-2011, 04:09 PM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 44,910
Default Swedish Hospital Cherry Hill Food


"Evelyn" wrote in message
...
On Mon, 12 Sep 2011 06:56:51 -0700, "Julie Bove"
wrote:


"Evelyn" wrote in message
. ..
On Sun, 11 Sep 2011 21:27:27 -0700, "Julie Bove"
wrote:


"Robert Miles" wrote in message
news.com...
On 9/5/2011 11:30 PM, Julie Bove wrote:
wrote in message
...
Given the relationship between Julie and her parents I would be
inclined
to start as I mean to go on. As you say, letting them know up front
what
you are willing/capable of doing. Not everyone has the ability to
look
after aging parents. Just before my mum went into a home I had two
young
babies. It was very stressful despite the fact that we had always
got
on
well.

Angela and I have both suggested two facilities that we found for
seniors
but they were totally unwilling to even consider it. My mom however
has
mentioned that she might have to put my dad in a home. But she is
very
much
in denial about herself.

Have you asked her to consider staying in the home for as long as your
father is there? That should at least allow her to get used to it
before she needs to make a final decision about whether to stay there.

No. Why would I mention that? She knows she *might* be able to do
that.
Or might not. Most likely not. Depends on if their insurance would
pay.
We just went through this with my SIL's dad. He should really be in a
home.
But he is refusing. When his wife was in there they tried to talk him
into
going to help care for her. He is totally senile but he does seem to
think
that he is helping her. There was no way. Their insurance wouldn't pay
for
it and they don't have the money to do it.


Dear Julie,

I cared for my mother in law almost till she died, and she had
alzheimers disease. They never want to leave their familiar
surroundings. It is very difficult. I hope you find workable
solutions.


Thankfully I'm not involved in that one. But he does want to leave and
that
is a problem. He will get in his car and drive somewhere. And then they
have to go find him.



On the newsgroup alt.support.alzheimers we encountered a lot of that.
The only way was to disable the car somehow. Yes, it is extremely
difficult. Thankfully, my 98 year old father quit driving on his
own. I have no idea how we would have dealt with that.


My dad's car is parked over at my brother's house which is several miles
away. Of course he might still try to drive my mom's car. Too soon to tell
I guess.




  #146 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 15-09-2011, 08:24 PM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Posts: 881
Default Swedish Hospital Cherry Hill Food

Storrmmee wrote:
snip

That was the idea that tones of peole had and that was encouraged by
banks, realtos, etc who then sold houses with trick mortgages tht
went way up in interest rates afeter a few years. The assumptin was
that the house woul dbe worth so much more that the people who would
be unable to pay the high interest rates would be able to sell out
at the higher price and do the same thing al oer again.

You may not have had the adjustable mortgage, but your husband had
the idea that many many people had and that ultimately led to the
finanial and housing crash that has led to the terrible current economy.
Your husband was far from alone. Many Americans kept
taking out money fromtheir houses by refinancing or takign out
second mortgages that when the housing prices fell, they were left
underwater(house worth less than mortgage). Wendy


All this is true, but just as an aside, I just want to point out that there
is nothing wrong with adjustable mortgages per se. We've had them for
decades, and always made out better than people with fixed. But an
adjustable mortgage ought to have both annual and lifetime limits on how
much it can adjust, and you ought to pay attention to the actual reset terms
(X percentage over Y rate), not just pick one with the lowest teaser rate
that enables you to qualify for the biggest mortgage. The people who went
wrong generally went for things like balloon mortgages, which have been
notoriously risky for decades, and other excessively risky constructs with
unrealistically low teaser rates followed by huge adjustments.

Not to mention the whole issue of loans being written with no income
verification...




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