Tea (rec.drink.tea) Discussion relating to tea, the world's second most consumed beverage (after water), made by infusing or boiling the leaves of the tea plant (C. sinensis or close relatives) in water.

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Old 28-01-2005, 08:29 AM
Top Spin
 
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Default How to measure tea

I see in the FAQ that there are several suggestions for measuring tea:

1. 1 tsp per person + 1 tsp for the pot. This seems problematic. I
bought some tea samples and they vary considerably in how dense they
are.

2. 1 tsp for anywhere from 5.5 oz to 16 oz of water. Again, this is a
large range.

3. 15 g per liter of water. This translates to about 2.66 g for a 6-oz
cup or about 10.65 g for a 4-cup pot.

A local tea shop has a handout that gives the amount of tea by weight
for a 4-cup pot. Most of the teas call for 6 g / pot, with a few
calling for 7 or 8. The herbals are more, up to 10 g / pot.

Browing the Upton site, I check 10-15 teas including blacks, oolongs,
and greens and they all caleld for 2 1/4 g/cup. If they mean a 6 oz
cup, that would be 10 g for a 24 oz (4 cup) pot. If they mean an 8 oz
cup, that would be 7.5 g for a 24 oz pot.

I have a scale with an accuracy of 1g. I usually use a 4-cup (24 oz)
pot. How much tea should I use by weight in grams?

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Old 28-01-2005, 11:50 AM
Mike Petro
 
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Default

My general rule of thumb is 1g for every 2oz of water, but then I like
my tea a little on the strong side. I also ONLY steep for 3 minutes to
avoid harshness. This yields a good cup to my tastes.

Mike
http://www.pu-erh.net

On Fri, 28 Jan 2005 00:29:53 -0800, Top Spin
cast caution to the wind and posted:

I see in the FAQ that there are several suggestions for measuring tea:

1. 1 tsp per person + 1 tsp for the pot. This seems problematic. I
bought some tea samples and they vary considerably in how dense they
are.

2. 1 tsp for anywhere from 5.5 oz to 16 oz of water. Again, this is a
large range.

3. 15 g per liter of water. This translates to about 2.66 g for a 6-oz
cup or about 10.65 g for a 4-cup pot.

A local tea shop has a handout that gives the amount of tea by weight
for a 4-cup pot. Most of the teas call for 6 g / pot, with a few
calling for 7 or 8. The herbals are more, up to 10 g / pot.

Browing the Upton site, I check 10-15 teas including blacks, oolongs,
and greens and they all caleld for 2 1/4 g/cup. If they mean a 6 oz
cup, that would be 10 g for a 24 oz (4 cup) pot. If they mean an 8 oz
cup, that would be 7.5 g for a 24 oz pot.

I have a scale with an accuracy of 1g. I usually use a 4-cup (24 oz)
pot. How much tea should I use by weight in grams?



Mike Petro
http://www.pu-erh.net
remove the "filter" in my email address to reply
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Old 28-01-2005, 05:41 PM
Space Cowboy
 
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Default

My rule of thumb know your pot, know your tea, and know your tastebuds.
If the tea taste strong then more water or less tea, if weak less
water or more tea. Some people add temperature and a timer to the mix.
I just use boiling water and wait. I use a 1 liter pot for all teas
and I eyeball the amount from previous experience which might be a
pinch more for this and less for that. I use that figuratively, pinch
your tea for measurement of larger grades and palm for the smaller. If
you're a neophyte start with some recommended calculations then throw
away the sliderule when you realize your tastebuds are the only ones
that count. Brewing tea is an art form and not a science project. My
latest version of judging the perfect cuppa is waiting for the leaves
to look just right in the pot.

Jim

Top Spin wrote:
I see in the FAQ that there are several suggestions for measuring

tea:

1. 1 tsp per person + 1 tsp for the pot. This seems problematic. I
bought some tea samples and they vary considerably in how dense they
are.

2. 1 tsp for anywhere from 5.5 oz to 16 oz of water. Again, this is a
large range.

3. 15 g per liter of water. This translates to about 2.66 g for a

6-oz
cup or about 10.65 g for a 4-cup pot.

A local tea shop has a handout that gives the amount of tea by weight
for a 4-cup pot. Most of the teas call for 6 g / pot, with a few
calling for 7 or 8. The herbals are more, up to 10 g / pot.

Browing the Upton site, I check 10-15 teas including blacks, oolongs,
and greens and they all caleld for 2 1/4 g/cup. If they mean a 6 oz
cup, that would be 10 g for a 24 oz (4 cup) pot. If they mean an 8 oz
cup, that would be 7.5 g for a 24 oz pot.

I have a scale with an accuracy of 1g. I usually use a 4-cup (24 oz)
pot. How much tea should I use by weight in grams?

--
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(11/09/04)




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Old 28-01-2005, 08:56 PM
Top Spin
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On 28 Jan 2005 09:41:45 -0800, "Space Cowboy"
wrote:

My rule of thumb know your pot, know your tea, and know your tastebuds.
If the tea taste strong then more water or less tea, if weak less
water or more tea. Some people add temperature and a timer to the mix.
I just use boiling water and wait. I use a 1 liter pot for all teas
and I eyeball the amount from previous experience which might be a
pinch more for this and less for that. I use that figuratively, pinch
your tea for measurement of larger grades and palm for the smaller. If
you're a neophyte start with some recommended calculations then throw
away the sliderule when you realize your tastebuds are the only ones
that count. Brewing tea is an art form and not a science project. My
latest version of judging the perfect cuppa is waiting for the leaves
to look just right in the pot.


In the end, you are, of course, right. However, for an inexperienced
tea drinker, it is helpful to know how tea is supposed to taste.

For me, and I imagine many people, tea is an aquired taste. I first
tried it 20-30 years ago and did not like it at all. That might have
been because it was not good tea, not well prepared, etc.

I have returned to it in the last few years mainly because of health
reasons. I am finding that there are so many variables, that I would
like to try and get a handle on the way most people brew their tea. I
will then have to try various combinations within those ranges and
then make my own choices.

But it helps to have some general recommendations from those with more
experience. I'd just like to start my experimenting somewhere in the
"typical" range.

Thanks


--
Email: Usenet-20031220 at spamex.com
(11/09/04)
  #7 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 28-01-2005, 11:26 PM
Melinda
 
Posts: n/a
Default

By health reasons, I am guessing that you are more interested in greens. If
that is the case, the two most important things I think relate to getting a
(more) acceptable taste out of greens for the western/new palate a

Never use boiling water for greens

and

don't steep too long.

What's too long? This Christmas I received two greens which were brand new
to me from Holy Mountain as a gift from my sweetie. I had no prior
experience with these greens or ones quite like them, so my start was to use
a teaspoon a cup (heaping somewhat since they were twisty) and steeping
them, in a glass mason jar, at water around 170 (I am tending to use cooler
than the usually recommended 180 because I find 180 to bring out too much
harshness too soon...at least in the case of greens other than my run of the
mill gunpowder, which...I don't care about it's bitterness since I mix it
with mint). I steeped the first tea (huang shan mao feng) for around 30
seconds but found (to my memory..I could have the time wrong) that it wasn't
very strong. The next steep of those leaves I increased the time but not the
temp. It's touchy sometimes and depends on at what point your tastebuds say
the drink has become too bitter or astringent. For instance, some on here
love sencha (Japanese green) but I have been finding it too astringent for
me most of the time, so I prefer Chinese greens at this point.

My point is, each tea is actually pretty different and a 20-30 second
oversteep CAN make something pass into the realm of bitterness. I have found
that if I get a sample of a green I use the cooler water (even 165 or some
say 150) and then I taste it as it steeps and decant when I feel it's
reached where I want it. I like getting larger amounts of greens though so I
can have that tea over a period of time and get to know it better. But the
cooler water seems to let me get a handle on the new tea quicker than it
would if I were steeping at a higher one. My thought is make sure you start
with water at most at 170. Unless it's a more delicate green (gyokuro or
something) in which case...150-160? (comments on this from those who drink
it more often welcome).

Hope this helps somewhat.

Melinda

In the end, you are, of course, right. However, for an inexperienced
tea drinker, it is helpful to know how tea is supposed to taste.

For me, and I imagine many people, tea is an aquired taste. I first
tried it 20-30 years ago and did not like it at all. That might have
been because it was not good tea, not well prepared, etc.

I have returned to it in the last few years mainly because of health
reasons. I am finding that there are so many variables, that I would
like to try and get a handle on the way most people brew their tea. I
will then have to try various combinations within those ranges and
then make my own choices.

But it helps to have some general recommendations from those with more
experience. I'd just like to start my experimenting somewhere in the
"typical" range.

Thanks


--
Email: Usenet-20031220 at spamex.com
(11/09/04)



  #8 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 29-01-2005, 01:02 AM
pilo_
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article ,
Mike Petro wrote:

My general rule of thumb is 1g for every 2oz of water, but then I like
my tea a little on the strong side. I also ONLY steep for 3 minutes to
avoid harshness. This yields a good cup to my tastes.


anything over 3 minutes is adding only astringency.
all the flavor is in the water by 3 minutes......pilo*
  #9 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 29-01-2005, 07:05 PM
Bluesea
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Top Spin" wrote in message
...
I see in the FAQ that there are several suggestions for measuring tea:

1. 1 tsp per person + 1 tsp for the pot.


1 for the pot is an old wives' tale, I suspect started by those who like a
stiff brew.

Browing the Upton site, I check 10-15 teas including blacks, oolongs,
and greens and they all caleld for 2 1/4 g/cup. If they mean a 6 oz
cup,


Yes, Upton adheres to the tea standard of a 6 oz. cup. I don't know where it
is on the website, if present, but it is stated in the hard-copy catalog.

I have a scale with an accuracy of 1g. I usually use a 4-cup (24 oz)
pot. How much tea should I use by weight in grams?


Start out w/ 2 g per 6 oz cup. Modify from there to suit your personal taste
after you gain experience with a tea. For example, for most teas for me, I
figure per 8 oz, but others, I figure per 6 oz.

--
~~Bluesea~~
Spam is great in musubi but not in email.
Please take out the trash before sending a direct reply.


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Old 30-01-2005, 01:54 PM
Dog Ma 1
 
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Default

Bluesea wrote:
1 for the pot is an old wives' tale, I suspect started by those who like a
stiff brew.
...
Start out w/ 2 g per 6 oz cup.


The pejorative seems gratuitous. OWT implies myth. One per cup plus one for
the pot is a valid cultural preference, common in the UK and especially in
the cold north. Since tea there is often brewed in what most of us would
consider large pots, the "extra" measure might not make much difference to
taste. I'm going to hazard a guess that it evolved as a gesture of
generosity - since tea doesn't pile evenly, and can easily slip out of a
measuring spoon in the source tin, the extra shows good intention toward
guests.

Also, since the unit of measure is a teaspoon, 2g is about right. So what's
the gripe?

My mother's family is from Yorkshire, and that's the way we always had it. I
also saw it done that way routinely during the several years I spent in the
UK. Hardly an OWT.

-DM




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Old 30-01-2005, 09:40 PM
Bluesea
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Dog Ma 1" (reply w/o spam) wrote in message
...
Bluesea wrote:
1 for the pot is an old wives' tale, I suspect started by those who like

a
stiff brew.
...
Start out w/ 2 g per 6 oz cup.


The pejorative seems gratuitous. OWT implies myth. One per cup plus one

for
the pot is a valid cultural preference, common in the UK and especially in
the cold north. Since tea there is often brewed in what most of us would
consider large pots, the "extra" measure might not make much difference to
taste. I'm going to hazard a guess that it evolved as a gesture of
generosity - since tea doesn't pile evenly, and can easily slip out of a
measuring spoon in the source tin, the extra shows good intention toward
guests.

Also, since the unit of measure is a teaspoon, 2g is about right. So

what's
the gripe?

My mother's family is from Yorkshire, and that's the way we always had it.

I
also saw it done that way routinely during the several years I spent in

the
UK. Hardly an OWT.


I'm sorry that you took it in a manner that I didn't intend. My point was
that some instruct to add extra tea that isn't necessary - that those who
instruct to do so are carrying on a tradition from "those who like a stiff
brew" which is *exactly* what I said.

What I didn't say was I've been told that the pot absorbs an amount of tea
so great as to require an extra teaspoon - that part *is* an OWT especially
for modern glazed, glass, or metal pots.

If the OP starts out w/ 2g per cup and finds that a stiffer brew is
preferred, by all means "add one for the pot." I'm not against regional
tastes, tradition, or personal preference; just nonsensical rationale for
doing things.

There was no gripe, no pejorative intended. I hope this clears up any
misunderstanding.


--
~~Bluesea~~
Spam is great in musubi but not in email.
Please take out the trash before sending a direct reply.


  #12 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 31-01-2005, 04:16 AM
Top Spin
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Fri, 28 Jan 2005 15:26:46 -0800, "Melinda"
wrote:

By health reasons, I am guessing that you are more interested in greens.


In one sense, yes. But I have found that a pot of (any) tea over an
afternoon will keep me from snacking. So I am experimenting with
greens, blacks, and oolongs.

It sounds like I need to do some experimenting. I have never tried a
temperature as low as 170, let alone 150, or a time under 2 minutes,
let alone 30 seconds.

If
that is the case, the two most important things I think relate to getting a
(more) acceptable taste out of greens for the western/new palate a

Never use boiling water for greens

and

don't steep too long.

What's too long? This Christmas I received two greens which were brand new
to me from Holy Mountain as a gift from my sweetie. I had no prior
experience with these greens or ones quite like them, so my start was to use
a teaspoon a cup (heaping somewhat since they were twisty) and steeping
them, in a glass mason jar, at water around 170 (I am tending to use cooler
than the usually recommended 180 because I find 180 to bring out too much
harshness too soon...at least in the case of greens other than my run of the
mill gunpowder, which...I don't care about it's bitterness since I mix it
with mint). I steeped the first tea (huang shan mao feng) for around 30
seconds but found (to my memory..I could have the time wrong) that it wasn't
very strong. The next steep of those leaves I increased the time but not the
temp. It's touchy sometimes and depends on at what point your tastebuds say
the drink has become too bitter or astringent. For instance, some on here
love sencha (Japanese green) but I have been finding it too astringent for
me most of the time, so I prefer Chinese greens at this point.

My point is, each tea is actually pretty different and a 20-30 second
oversteep CAN make something pass into the realm of bitterness. I have found
that if I get a sample of a green I use the cooler water (even 165 or some
say 150) and then I taste it as it steeps and decant when I feel it's
reached where I want it. I like getting larger amounts of greens though so I
can have that tea over a period of time and get to know it better. But the
cooler water seems to let me get a handle on the new tea quicker than it
would if I were steeping at a higher one. My thought is make sure you start
with water at most at 170. Unless it's a more delicate green (gyokuro or
something) in which case...150-160? (comments on this from those who drink
it more often welcome).

Hope this helps somewhat.

Melinda

In the end, you are, of course, right. However, for an inexperienced
tea drinker, it is helpful to know how tea is supposed to taste.

For me, and I imagine many people, tea is an aquired taste. I first
tried it 20-30 years ago and did not like it at all. That might have
been because it was not good tea, not well prepared, etc.

I have returned to it in the last few years mainly because of health
reasons. I am finding that there are so many variables, that I would
like to try and get a handle on the way most people brew their tea. I
will then have to try various combinations within those ranges and
then make my own choices.

But it helps to have some general recommendations from those with more
experience. I'd just like to start my experimenting somewhere in the
"typical" range.

Thanks


--
Email: Usenet-20031220 at spamex.com
(11/09/04)




--
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Old 31-01-2005, 04:38 AM
Top Spin
 
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Default

On Fri, 28 Jan 2005 06:50:26 -0500, Mike Petro
wrote:

My general rule of thumb is 1g for every 2oz of water, but then I like
my tea a little on the strong side. I also ONLY steep for 3 minutes to
avoid harshness. This yields a good cup to my tastes.


From the reading I have been doing, that is a little more tea/cup than
most.

Upton recommends 2 1/4 g/cup or about 9 grams/4-cup pot (24 oz).

My local tea shop recommends anywhere from 6 to 10 grams/pot (24 oz).
The blacks are mostly 6, the oolongs mostly 7-8, the greens mostly 6,
and the herbals as much as 10.

Most sources seem to agree with your advice to keep the steeping time
constant and vary the amount of tea.

I have some experimenting to do.

Thanks

--
Email: Usenet-20031220 at spamex.com
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Old 31-01-2005, 04:41 AM
Top Spin
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Fri, 28 Jan 2005 12:15:25 GMT, Michael Plant
wrote:

Top 1/28/05


snip

I have a scale with an accuracy of 1g. I usually use a 4-cup (24 oz)
pot. How much tea should I use by weight in grams?


Here are my usual starting points: These are take off points, but they
usually work pretty well. I find that increasing the amount of tea and
decreasing the steep time gives a better cup than doing it the other way.
These parameters will not work for Assam or Ceylon black teas because
nothing does. There will be lots of different opinions on the Pu'erh params.
Mike uses a higher proportion of leaf, I think. With Pu'erhs, I like to play
with the time more since Pu'erhs can get unpleasant quickly if left to their
own devices. Finally, 24 ounces is pretty big for me. My biggest tea brewing
vessel of the moment is around 15 ounces. More usually, I brew between 2 and
8 ounces at a time. Just thoughts

Green Tea
Half as many grams of tea as there are ounces of water.


That's slightly more than most recommend.

Red Tea
One third as many grams of tea as there are ounces of water
or slightly more.


What's a red tea? I found several refernces in the FAQ to teas that
have a red liquor, but no red tea.

Oolong Tea (assuming Gungfu)
Twice as many grams of tea as there are ounces of water


Wow. I don't know what Gungfu is. Also not in the FAQ. But that's a
lot of tea -- as much as 6 times as much as most recommendations.

Green Pu'erh
Half as many grams of tea as there are ounces of water
(175F for around 3.5 to 4 minutes) Courtesy of Lew Perin

or

As many grams of tea as there are ounces of water
(hotter water, quickish steeps, Gungfu style)


Michael



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Old 31-01-2005, 05:30 AM
Bluesea
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Top Spin" wrote in message
...
On Fri, 28 Jan 2005 12:15:25 GMT, Michael Plant
wrote:

Red Tea
One third as many grams of tea as there are ounces of water
or slightly more.


What's a red tea? I found several refernces in the FAQ to teas that
have a red liquor, but no red tea.


China black a.k.a. China Congou a.k.a. red tea.


Oolong Tea (assuming Gungfu)
Twice as many grams of tea as there are ounces of water


Wow. I don't know what Gungfu is. Also not in the FAQ. But that's a
lot of tea -- as much as 6 times as much as most recommendations.


Yes, it's in the FAQ although spelled as "gongfu":

http://pages.ripco.net/~c4ha2na9/tea/faq.html#3.1.2.


--
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Spam is great in musubi but not in email.
Please take out the trash before sending a direct reply.




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