General Cooking (rec.food.cooking) For general food and cooking discussion. Foods of all kinds, food procurement, cooking methods and techniques, eating, etc.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 03-06-2006, 01:52 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 2,313
Default Dishwashing liquid (environmental)


Does anyone use any of these products?

http://www.greenhome.com/products/ho...ish_detergent/

I have to wash my milk jar once a week in a environmental dishwashing soap,
whether it be dishwasher or dish pan. Does anyone have any suggestions of
any that might be in a regular grocery store that you have used?
thanks so much.
Dee Dee




  #2 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 03-06-2006, 04:08 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 5,103
Default Dishwashing liquid (environmental)

"Dee Randall" wrote in message
...

Does anyone use any of these products?

http://www.greenhome.com/products/ho...ish_detergent/

I have to wash my milk jar once a week in a environmental dishwashing
soap, whether it be dishwasher or dish pan. Does anyone have any
suggestions of any that might be in a regular grocery store that you have
used?
thanks so much.
Dee Dee


I'm not sure what a milk jar is, or who says you have to wash it any
particular way. But, no matter. Dish liquids - the kind you use for washing
by hand, are pretty much all phosphate free and biodegradable (two SEPARATE
issues). Take a look at Dawn "original", if you want a product that's tough
enough to clean ancient oil crud off a car engine, and has no stupid
perfumes or ingredients to make your hands softer. The label says "no
phosphates, contains biodegradable surfactants".

I don't use liquids in my dishwasher - I use tablets, so I can't advise you
on that. You'll have to read some labels. But, while it WAS very important
years ago to cut back on the use of phosphate-laden products in homes,
that's pretty much happened because so many laundry products are free of the
chemical now. What's left is very minor by comparison.

Save your money. According to every consumer-oriented thing I've read over
the past 10-15 years, "green" products are often no better than what's in
the stores.


  #3 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 03-06-2006, 04:59 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 9,551
Default Dishwashing liquid (environmental)


JoeSpareBedroom wrote:
"Dee Randall" wrote in message
...

Does anyone use any of these products?

http://www.greenhome.com/products/ho...ish_detergent/

I have to wash my milk jar once a week in a environmental dishwashing
soap, whether it be dishwasher or dish pan. Does anyone have any
suggestions of any that might be in a regular grocery store that you have
used?
thanks so much.
Dee Dee


I'm not sure what a milk jar is, or who says you have to wash it any
particular way. But, no matter. Dish liquids - the kind you use for washing
by hand, are pretty much all phosphate free and biodegradable (two SEPARATE
issues). Take a look at Dawn "original", if you want a product that's tough
enough to clean ancient oil crud off a car engine, and has no stupid
perfumes or ingredients to make your hands softer. The label says "no
phosphates, contains biodegradable surfactants".

I don't use liquids in my dishwasher - I use tablets, so I can't advise you
on that. You'll have to read some labels. But, while it WAS very important
years ago to cut back on the use of phosphate-laden products in homes,
that's pretty much happened because so many laundry products are free of the
chemical now. What's left is very minor by comparison.

Save your money. According to every consumer-oriented thing I've read over
the past 10-15 years, "green" products are often no better than what's in
the stores.


You can also cut way down on the volume of home cleaning products used
by installing a water softener... the savings on cleaning products will
more than pay for the water softener twice over... not to mention time
and effort saved from not having to do so much scrubbing of soap scum
and mineral deposits. I use tablets in my dishwasher too, but I cut
them in half... I use half the laundry soap too.. even shapoo goes more
than twice as far. I don't use bar soap, I prefer soft-soap/bath
gel... bar soap is wasteful. You gals will love showering with
softened water and bath gel... your skin will feel so slippery you
won't be able to stop touching yourself! LOL

Sheldon

  #4 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 03-06-2006, 05:03 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 5,103
Default Dishwashing liquid (environmental)


"Sheldon" wrote in message
oups.com...

JoeSpareBedroom wrote:
"Dee Randall" wrote in message
...

Does anyone use any of these products?

http://www.greenhome.com/products/ho...ish_detergent/

I have to wash my milk jar once a week in a environmental dishwashing
soap, whether it be dishwasher or dish pan. Does anyone have any
suggestions of any that might be in a regular grocery store that you
have
used?
thanks so much.
Dee Dee


I'm not sure what a milk jar is, or who says you have to wash it any
particular way. But, no matter. Dish liquids - the kind you use for
washing
by hand, are pretty much all phosphate free and biodegradable (two
SEPARATE
issues). Take a look at Dawn "original", if you want a product that's
tough
enough to clean ancient oil crud off a car engine, and has no stupid
perfumes or ingredients to make your hands softer. The label says "no
phosphates, contains biodegradable surfactants".

I don't use liquids in my dishwasher - I use tablets, so I can't advise
you
on that. You'll have to read some labels. But, while it WAS very
important
years ago to cut back on the use of phosphate-laden products in homes,
that's pretty much happened because so many laundry products are free of
the
chemical now. What's left is very minor by comparison.

Save your money. According to every consumer-oriented thing I've read
over
the past 10-15 years, "green" products are often no better than what's in
the stores.


You can also cut way down on the volume of home cleaning products used
by installing a water softener... the savings on cleaning products will
more than pay for the water softener twice over... not to mention time
and effort saved from not having to do so much scrubbing of soap scum
and mineral deposits. I use tablets in my dishwasher too, but I cut
them in half... I use half the laundry soap too.. even shapoo goes more
than twice as far. I don't use bar soap, I prefer soft-soap/bath
gel... bar soap is wasteful. You gals will love showering with
softened water and bath gel... your skin will feel so slippery you
won't be able to stop touching yourself! LOL

Sheldon


Bar soap wasteful? Maybe sorta kinda. If you wanted to be picky when
comparing it to the gel, you could say that the gel comes in a plastic
bottle, which may appear to be recyclable, but in fact, is not. And, this is
for business reasons: Many municipalities are having difficulty finding
buyers for the sheer volume of plastic they collect. So, the stuff just sits
around.


  #5 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 03-06-2006, 05:15 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 8,635
Default Dishwashing liquid (environmental)

JoeSpareBedroom wrote:

Take a look at Dawn "original", if you want a product that's tough
enough to clean ancient oil crud off a car engine, and has no stupid
perfumes or ingredients to make your hands softer. The label says "no
phosphates, contains biodegradable surfactants".


I am unable to find "non-ultra" Dawn recently. Perhaps it
isn't distributed in my local market. When they changed
the formula to "ultra" several years back, it seems it does
not rinse as easily.

Steve


  #6 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 03-06-2006, 05:18 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 8,635
Default Dishwashing liquid (environmental)

JoeSpareBedroom wrote:

Bar soap wasteful? Maybe sorta kinda. If you wanted to be picky when
comparing it to the gel, you could say that the gel comes in a plastic
bottle, which may appear to be recyclable, but in fact, is not. And, this is
for business reasons: Many municipalities are having difficulty finding
buyers for the sheer volume of plastic they collect. So, the stuff just sits
around.


One can re-fill liquid soap containers to get around
this problem. I buy liquid soap from Body Time, it
is non-antibacterial and unscented. They credit you
with $0.50 if you re-use the container.

Steve
  #7 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 03-06-2006, 05:29 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 5,103
Default Dishwashing liquid (environmental)


"Steve Pope" wrote in message
...
JoeSpareBedroom wrote:

Take a look at Dawn "original", if you want a product that's tough
enough to clean ancient oil crud off a car engine, and has no stupid
perfumes or ingredients to make your hands softer. The label says "no
phosphates, contains biodegradable surfactants".


I am unable to find "non-ultra" Dawn recently. Perhaps it
isn't distributed in my local market. When they changed
the formula to "ultra" several years back, it seems it does
not rinse as easily.

Steve


What supermarket do you shop at which does not carry the original version?


  #8 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 03-06-2006, 05:29 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 2,415
Default Dishwashing liquid (environmental)

On Sat, 3 Jun 2006 08:52:11 -0400, "Dee Randall"
wrote:


Does anyone use any of these products?

http://www.greenhome.com/products/ho...ish_detergent/

I have to wash my milk jar once a week in a environmental dishwashing soap,
whether it be dishwasher or dish pan. Does anyone have any suggestions of
any that might be in a regular grocery store that you have used?
thanks so much.
Dee Dee



Check out Whole Foods. They have shelves full of organic cleaning
products. You may have to try a few to find the one that works best
with you water and dishwasher.
--
Susan N.

"Moral indignation is in most cases two percent moral,
48 percent indignation, and 50 percent envy."
Vittorio De Sica, Italian movie director (1901-1974
  #9 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 03-06-2006, 06:26 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 8,635
Default Dishwashing liquid (environmental)

JoeSpareBedroom wrote:

"Steve Pope" wrote in message


I am unable to find "non-ultra" Dawn recently.


What supermarket do you shop at which does not carry the original version?


My local Andronico's (Berkeley CA), but now I'm inspired to
check one or two other places since by you're report it's
still around.

Steve
  #10 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 03-06-2006, 07:03 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 5,103
Default Dishwashing liquid (environmental)


"Steve Pope" wrote in message
...
JoeSpareBedroom wrote:

"Steve Pope" wrote in message


I am unable to find "non-ultra" Dawn recently.


What supermarket do you shop at which does not carry the original version?


My local Andronico's (Berkeley CA), but now I'm inspired to
check one or two other places since by you're report it's
still around.

Steve


Safeway & Vons carry the 38 oz size. UPC 37000-42902. Individual stores may
not stock it because they like to play games like that. But, you can usually
talk to a manager and they'll order it from their warehouse. If they give
you a dumb look, give them this information:

This is Safeway's internal item code:
3531010109

This is the Vons item code:
2231010109

Albertson's shows the 25 oz size as a normal item in your area, too. Their
item code:
1537158

Lucky Stores data shows the product name, but no sizes.

However, there is no "original" Dawn being made any more. The most basic
ultra product is a more highly concentrated version of the original. If you
find it doesn't rinse as easily, try using less, especially if you have
relatively soft water. Not softened by a machine in your house, but
naturally soft.

http://www.pg.com/product_card/brand...nd_nam e=Dawn




  #11 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 03-06-2006, 07:08 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 8,635
Default Dishwashing liquid (environmental)

JoeSpareBedroom wrote:

"Steve Pope" wrote in message


JoeSpareBedroom wrote:


What supermarket do you shop at which does not carry the original version?


My local Andronico's (Berkeley CA), but now I'm inspired to
check one or two other places since by you're report it's
still around.


Safeway & Vons carry the 38 oz size. UPC 37000-42902. Individual stores may
not stock it because they like to play games like that. But, you can usually
talk to a manager and they'll order it from their warehouse. If they give
you a dumb look, give them this information:


This is Safeway's internal item code:
3531010109


This is the Vons item code:
2231010109


Albertson's shows the 25 oz size as a normal item in your area, too. Their
item code:
1537158


Lucky Stores data shows the product name, but no sizes.


However, there is no "original" Dawn being made any more. The most basic
ultra product is a more highly concentrated version of the original. If you
find it doesn't rinse as easily, try using less, especially if you have
relatively soft water. Not softened by a machine in your house, but
naturally soft.


For a while, Dawn marketed the original product which said
"non-ultra" on the label. I think you are confirming that
this isn't available anymore.

Steve

  #12 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 03-06-2006, 07:29 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 5,103
Default Dishwashing liquid (environmental)


"Steve Pope" wrote in message
...
JoeSpareBedroom wrote:

"Steve Pope" wrote in message


JoeSpareBedroom wrote:


What supermarket do you shop at which does not carry the original
version?


My local Andronico's (Berkeley CA), but now I'm inspired to
check one or two other places since by you're report it's
still around.


Safeway & Vons carry the 38 oz size. UPC 37000-42902. Individual stores
may
not stock it because they like to play games like that. But, you can
usually
talk to a manager and they'll order it from their warehouse. If they give
you a dumb look, give them this information:


This is Safeway's internal item code:
3531010109


This is the Vons item code:
2231010109


Albertson's shows the 25 oz size as a normal item in your area, too. Their
item code:
1537158


Lucky Stores data shows the product name, but no sizes.


However, there is no "original" Dawn being made any more. The most basic
ultra product is a more highly concentrated version of the original. If
you
find it doesn't rinse as easily, try using less, especially if you have
relatively soft water. Not softened by a machine in your house, but
naturally soft.


For a while, Dawn marketed the original product which said
"non-ultra" on the label. I think you are confirming that
this isn't available anymore.

Steve


Right. I don't see on the Proctor & Gamble web site any longer. But, the
product was so popular, it would've made no sense for them to make the most
basic ultra version into something totally unusable. So seriously...try
using less. It's hard to know if you have hard or soft water, unless you
have something to compare it to. My water company calls ours "medium
hardness", which seems correct compared to other places I've lived, like
Long Island, where it was next to impossible to rinse off soap until you
learned to use much less.


  #13 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 03-06-2006, 07:35 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 9,551
Default Dishwashing liquid (environmental)


JoeSpareBedroom wrote:
"Sheldon" wrote in message
oups.com...

JoeSpareBedroom wrote:
"Dee Randall" wrote in message
...

Does anyone use any of these products?

http://www.greenhome.com/products/ho...ish_detergent/

I have to wash my milk jar once a week in a environmental dishwashing
soap, whether it be dishwasher or dish pan. Does anyone have any
suggestions of any that might be in a regular grocery store that you
have
used?
thanks so much.
Dee Dee

I'm not sure what a milk jar is, or who says you have to wash it any
particular way. But, no matter. Dish liquids - the kind you use for
washing
by hand, are pretty much all phosphate free and biodegradable (two
SEPARATE
issues). Take a look at Dawn "original", if you want a product that's
tough
enough to clean ancient oil crud off a car engine, and has no stupid
perfumes or ingredients to make your hands softer. The label says "no
phosphates, contains biodegradable surfactants".

I don't use liquids in my dishwasher - I use tablets, so I can't advise
you
on that. You'll have to read some labels. But, while it WAS very
important
years ago to cut back on the use of phosphate-laden products in homes,
that's pretty much happened because so many laundry products are free of
the
chemical now. What's left is very minor by comparison.

Save your money. According to every consumer-oriented thing I've read
over
the past 10-15 years, "green" products are often no better than what's in
the stores.


You can also cut way down on the volume of home cleaning products used
by installing a water softener... the savings on cleaning products will
more than pay for the water softener twice over... not to mention time
and effort saved from not having to do so much scrubbing of soap scum
and mineral deposits. I use tablets in my dishwasher too, but I cut
them in half... I use half the laundry soap too.. even shapoo goes more
than twice as far. I don't use bar soap, I prefer soft-soap/bath
gel... bar soap is wasteful. You gals will love showering with
softened water and bath gel... your skin will feel so slippery you
won't be able to stop touching yourself! LOL

Sheldon


Bar soap wasteful? Maybe sorta kinda. If you wanted to be picky when
comparing it to the gel, you could say that the gel comes in a plastic
bottle, which may appear to be recyclable, but in fact, is not. And, this is
for business reasons: Many municipalities are having difficulty finding
buyers for the sheer volume of plastic they collect. So, the stuff just sits
around.


Ridiculous... were that true soft drinks and bottle water would be
banned... you're probably the biggest offender, a fast food addict like
you... and liquid soap bottles are no problem, so few of yoose euros
and hillybillys bathe.

You're buying incorrectly... once you decide on which liquid/gel soaps
you like buy in bulk containers and refil the dispensers. Bar soap is
very wasteful, most ends up going down the drain, unused.... yeah, my
mother taught me all the tricks; open each bar as soon as you can to
let it dry out so it won't melt so fast, and save the slivers to squish
together... what a crock, just a big mess and wastes time for nothing,
still most bar soap just slides down the drain.

Liquid dispensed soaps are sanitary, no embedded pubic hairs, no
messy/gooey soap dishes to contend with and the pump dispensers can be
reused over and over for years and years. And dispensed soaps are far
more economical than bar soap... a very little is all that's needed, a
squirt the size of a dime is plenty to wash hands... a squirt the size
of a quarter on a wash cloth is plenty for a shower. I don't like
those squeeze bottle containers for shower gels either, they promote
using too much product... I recommend squeezing the shower gel into a
plastic pump bottle. All the liquid/gel cleaning products are readily
available in bulk, if not in your local stupidmarket then buy them on
line, greater assortment and much better prices. Anyone with a lot of
kids (more than one) should never use bar soap.

Sheldon

  #14 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 03-06-2006, 08:08 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 8,635
Default Dishwashing liquid (environmental)

JoeSpareBedroom wrote:

"Steve Pope" wrote in message


For a while, Dawn marketed the original product which said
"non-ultra" on the label. I think you are confirming that
this isn't available anymore.


Right. I don't see on the Proctor & Gamble web site any longer. But, the
product was so popular, it would've made no sense for them to make the most
basic ultra version into something totally unusable. So seriously...try
using less.


I didn't say "totally unusable". Just that it can take more
time to rinse. Yes, the water is fairly soft around here.

Steve
  #15 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 03-06-2006, 08:19 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 5,103
Default Dishwashing liquid (environmental)


"Steve Pope" wrote in message
...
JoeSpareBedroom wrote:

"Steve Pope" wrote in message


For a while, Dawn marketed the original product which said
"non-ultra" on the label. I think you are confirming that
this isn't available anymore.


Right. I don't see on the Proctor & Gamble web site any longer. But, the
product was so popular, it would've made no sense for them to make the
most
basic ultra version into something totally unusable. So seriously...try
using less.


I didn't say "totally unusable". Just that it can take more
time to rinse. Yes, the water is fairly soft around here.

Steve


What's your water source? Up in the hills? Or, underground aquifer? The
latter tends to be softer if you're near the ocean.




Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Dishwashing III, the survival Polly Esther[_2_] General Cooking 35 01-09-2011 07:16 AM
RE; Dishwashing Tip of the Day nurk_fred2000 General Cooking 0 27-08-2011 09:24 PM
Low foaming liquid dishwashing detergent Paul M. Cook General Cooking 24 16-05-2011 09:09 PM
Low foaming liquid dishwashing detergent Steve Freides[_2_] General Cooking 0 09-05-2011 04:37 PM
gloves for dishwashing Jeneen Sommers General Cooking 14 08-05-2005 08:54 AM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 01:41 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2022, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2022 FoodBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about Food and drink"

 

Copyright © 2017