Sushi (alt.food.sushi) For talking sushi. (Sashimi, wasabi, miso soup, and other elements of the sushi experience are valid topics.) Sushi is a broad topic; discussions range from preparation to methods of eating to favorite kinds to good restaurants.

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Old 16-06-2005, 03:39 PM
George
 
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Default White Tuna

The wife took me out for the second time this month to our nearest,
hence favorite, Sushi Bar last Sunday. This time, we had only ice water
and the bill ran $45, not to be too mercenary.

First, we ordered the miso soup which we both love. They had a special
board off of which we ordered two different options of maki. Each were
excellent and had some new twists. Neither had nori. The first, which I
never was exactly sure how it was spelled - something like Katsio, had
tobiko on the outside of the rice, tuna & avocado inside with wasabi,
smoked eel on top with spicy mayo. The second was just called Fancy Maki
which included spicy tuna inside the rice, some green onion and bonita
flakes on the top of the sesame covered rice. I might be wrong on which
was which.

Not finished yet, we ordered tako (cooked) nigiri and a spider roll. The
tako we've had before and it was good, but cooked (missed the little
asterisk on the sheet) didn't do it for my raw fix. The spider roll I
had to have in honor of my grandmother whose favorite at the Jersey
shore in the summer was a soft-shelled crab roll. Very tasty indeed, but
now that I've had it, I'll wait to have it outside a sushi venue.

Remembering that I had seen "Mixed Japanese Pickles" on the appetizer
list, we ordered some of them. The only thing I think I correctly
identified was the diakon radish which was yellow and slightly sweet.
Then there was a green, salty pickle that looked like regular gherkin
sized pickle chips. Finally, a red pickle that appeared to be possibly
some type of cabbage, had a light vinegary flavor. They were easy to
eat, but I guess I expected more and will try something different next time.

Finally, not sure what to get next, but wanting something, I asked about
the uni. This visit they were out. I asked if when they bought it, they
ever had it from Maine. My itamae said that it came from Boston, which
likely had gotten it from Maine. I asked about toro which was listed as
seasonal and they had none. I was given an explanation, but I could not
quite understand what was said and didn't want to embarrass myself or
him by asking twice. So he suggested white tuna nigiri style. It was
very light in flavor and completed our luncheon date.

My question is whether "white tuna" is traditional Japanese and what
would it be called if it is? I searched a bit on the web where it was
only referred to as white tuna.

Sorry for being so wordy, just trying to relive the pleasure ;-)
George
--
The First Nation people call him "Walking Eagle" because he's so full of
shit he can't fly anymore.

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Old 16-06-2005, 04:02 PM
Musashi
 
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Default


"George" wrote in message
...
The wife took me out for the second time this month to our nearest,
hence favorite, Sushi Bar last Sunday. This time, we had only ice water
and the bill ran $45, not to be too mercenary.

First, we ordered the miso soup which we both love. They had a special
board off of which we ordered two different options of maki. Each were
excellent and had some new twists. Neither had nori. The first, which I
never was exactly sure how it was spelled - something like Katsio, had
tobiko on the outside of the rice, tuna & avocado inside with wasabi,
smoked eel on top with spicy mayo. The second was just called Fancy Maki
which included spicy tuna inside the rice, some green onion and bonita
flakes on the top of the sesame covered rice. I might be wrong on which
was which.


Those are both rolls "Made in the USA". Traditional Japanese Maki always
have
the nori wrapped on the outside. But if it tastes good, nothing wrong with
it.

Not finished yet, we ordered tako (cooked) nigiri and a spider roll. The
tako we've had before and it was good, but cooked (missed the little
asterisk on the sheet) didn't do it for my raw fix.


Tako is always used cooked for sushi. In a few places in Japan, as well as
really upper-end
Japanese Restaurants in the US you can sometimes get Tako Sashimi which is
raw.
As you can imagine, it's nothing like the cooked version.


The spider roll I
had to have in honor of my grandmother whose favorite at the Jersey
shore in the summer was a soft-shelled crab roll. Very tasty indeed, but
now that I've had it, I'll wait to have it outside a sushi venue.


The softe shelled crabs started appearing here in the New York City suburbs
about 2 weeks ago.
I have eaten 5 crabs already.

Remembering that I had seen "Mixed Japanese Pickles" on the appetizer
list, we ordered some of them. The only thing I think I correctly
identified was the diakon radish which was yellow and slightly sweet.


This is called Takuan.

Then there was a green, salty pickle that looked like regular gherkin
sized pickle chips.


Probably green Shibazuke. Pickled cucumbers, also comes in red shiso color.

Finally, a red pickle that appeared to be possibly
some type of cabbage, had a light vinegary flavor.


Can't place this one.

They were easy to
eat, but I guess I expected more and will try something different next

time.

Finally, not sure what to get next, but wanting something, I asked about
the uni. This visit they were out. I asked if when they bought it, they
ever had it from Maine. My itamae said that it came from Boston, which
likely had gotten it from Maine. I asked about toro which was listed as
seasonal and they had none. I was given an explanation, but I could not
quite understand what was said and didn't want to embarrass myself or
him by asking twice. So he suggested white tuna nigiri style. It was
very light in flavor and completed our luncheon date.

My question is whether "white tuna" is traditional Japanese and what
would it be called if it is? I searched a bit on the web where it was
only referred to as white tuna.

Sorry for being so wordy, just trying to relive the pleasure ;-)
George


The White Tuna issue has been discussed here several times.
The term "White Tuna" is sometimes used as a litteral translation of "Shiro
Maguro" also known as Binchou Maguro
or Bin naga Maguro. This is Albacore, a member of the tuna family with
white-ish meat mostly known in the US as
chicken of the sea. Although it may be called "white tuna" it has a pinkish
tone.
But there is another fish which is also called "White Tuna" and the meat is
really really white.
This fish is called Escolar in the US and has been known to produce
digestion problems if eaten in any large quantity.
I myself have eaten it a couple of times and never had a problem. But others
have. Due to complaints about this,
many non-sushi restaurants in New York City stopped serving this fish (in
cooked form) according to a NY Times article.
My local itamae told me that this Escolar, known as Abura Bouzu in Japan is
not permitted by law to be served as sushi
neta because of this problem. So the answer is no. it is not a traditional
sushi neta at all.

Musashi



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Old 16-06-2005, 04:04 PM
Dan Logcher
 
Posts: n/a
Default

George wrote:
My question is whether "white tuna" is traditional Japanese and what
would it be called if it is? I searched a bit on the web where it was
only referred to as white tuna.


It is albacore tuna, and called bincho maguro or shiro maguro.
It is very tender, a pinkish color, and rich flavor. I do not think
it is a traditional item, but it is becoming available all over.

--
Dan
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Old 16-06-2005, 04:18 PM
Dan Logcher
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Musashi wrote:
The White Tuna issue has been discussed here several times.
The term "White Tuna" is sometimes used as a litteral translation of "Shiro
Maguro" also known as Binchou Maguro
or Bin naga Maguro. This is Albacore, a member of the tuna family with
white-ish meat mostly known in the US as
chicken of the sea. Although it may be called "white tuna" it has a pinkish
tone.
But there is another fish which is also called "White Tuna" and the meat is
really really white.
This fish is called Escolar in the US and has been known to produce
digestion problems if eaten in any large quantity.
I myself have eaten it a couple of times and never had a problem. But others
have. Due to complaints about this,
many non-sushi restaurants in New York City stopped serving this fish (in
cooked form) according to a NY Times article.
My local itamae told me that this Escolar, known as Abura Bouzu in Japan is
not permitted by law to be served as sushi
neta because of this problem. So the answer is no. it is not a traditional
sushi neta at all.


Pretty much all the places I've seen Escolar, they call it Super White Tuna.
And Albacore is called White Tuna. Only one place I know in my area has
Escolar labeled at mutzu and says its marlin. I had a long discussion about
this with the itamae, and he agrees that the labeling is an issue. The package
that it comes in is labeled Oilfish, not Escolar or Marlin. So I don't know
why things differ so much..

--
Dan
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Old 16-06-2005, 04:28 PM
Musashi
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Dan Logcher" wrote in message
...
Musashi wrote:
The White Tuna issue has been discussed here several times.
The term "White Tuna" is sometimes used as a litteral translation of

"Shiro
Maguro" also known as Binchou Maguro
or Bin naga Maguro. This is Albacore, a member of the tuna family with
white-ish meat mostly known in the US as
chicken of the sea. Although it may be called "white tuna" it has a

pinkish
tone.
But there is another fish which is also called "White Tuna" and the meat

is
really really white.
This fish is called Escolar in the US and has been known to produce
digestion problems if eaten in any large quantity.
I myself have eaten it a couple of times and never had a problem. But

others
have. Due to complaints about this,
many non-sushi restaurants in New York City stopped serving this fish

(in
cooked form) according to a NY Times article.
My local itamae told me that this Escolar, known as Abura Bouzu in Japan

is
not permitted by law to be served as sushi
neta because of this problem. So the answer is no. it is not a

traditional
sushi neta at all.


Pretty much all the places I've seen Escolar, they call it Super White

Tuna.
And Albacore is called White Tuna.


You are right. I always look at the neta with my own eyes to determine what
it is
so I never realized that.

Only one place I know in my area has
Escolar labeled at mutzu and says its marlin. I had a long discussion

about
this with the itamae, and he agrees that the labeling is an issue. The

package
that it comes in is labeled Oilfish, not Escolar or Marlin. So I don't

know
why things differ so much..


Yes, labeling of fish is usually quite complex and confusing even in one
country.
Then if you add another country, which has it's own labeling problems into
the mix
you end up with the mess we have now.
I have problems translating Esoclar to Mutsu...but Marlin (kajiki) is off
the meter.
M




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Old 16-06-2005, 04:31 PM
Musashi
 
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Default


"Dan Logcher" wrote in message
...
George wrote:
My question is whether "white tuna" is traditional Japanese and what
would it be called if it is? I searched a bit on the web where it was
only referred to as white tuna.


It is albacore tuna, and called bincho maguro or shiro maguro.
It is very tender, a pinkish color, and rich flavor. I do not think
it is a traditional item, but it is becoming available all over.


You're right Dan, Binchou Maguro is not a traditional item.
In Japan it's usually a by-product of fishing for Katsuo, which has
a high demand.
Most Albacore (and I think maybe even Kihada Maguro-Yellowfin Tuna)
are taken by the tuna "canning" industry.
M



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Old 16-06-2005, 04:43 PM
Dan Logcher
 
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Default

Musashi wrote:

I have problems translating Esoclar to Mutsu...but Marlin (kajiki) is off
the meter.


The first time I had escolar, it was called mutzu. There was no English
translation then.. so this is the second time I've seen it call mutzu,
but the translation isn't even close for marlin. I think they might
be calling it marlin to interest customers. If you called it Oilfish
they might not be as interested.

--
Dan
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Old 16-06-2005, 04:44 PM
Dan Logcher
 
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Default

Musashi wrote:
"Dan Logcher" wrote in message
...

It is albacore tuna, and called bincho maguro or shiro maguro.
It is very tender, a pinkish color, and rich flavor. I do not think
it is a traditional item, but it is becoming available all over.


You're right Dan, Binchou Maguro is not a traditional item.
In Japan it's usually a by-product of fishing for Katsuo, which has
a high demand.


That's something I haven't had yet this year, Katsuo. I need to check
around and see who's got it.

Most Albacore (and I think maybe even Kihada Maguro-Yellowfin Tuna)
are taken by the tuna "canning" industry.


Oh the humanity!!!

--
Dan
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Old 16-06-2005, 04:50 PM
Musashi
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Dan Logcher" wrote in message
...
Musashi wrote:

I have problems translating Esoclar to Mutsu...but Marlin (kajiki) is

off
the meter.


The first time I had escolar, it was called mutzu. There was no English
translation then.. so this is the second time I've seen it call mutzu,
but the translation isn't even close for marlin. I think they might
be calling it marlin to interest customers. If you called it Oilfish
they might not be as interested.


Agree "Oilfish"doesn't sound too appetizing.
M


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Old 16-06-2005, 05:10 PM
George
 
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Default

Dan Logcher wrote:
George wrote:

My question is whether "white tuna" is traditional Japanese and what
would it be called if it is? I searched a bit on the web where it was
only referred to as white tuna.



It is albacore tuna, and called bincho maguro or shiro maguro.
It is very tender, a pinkish color, and rich flavor. I do not think
it is a traditional item, but it is becoming available all over.


I will have to ask my itamae when I get a chance and he's not so busy,
but the "white tuna" I was served was absolutely white with no pinkness
to it. My wife commented that it was almost too bland as she likes it a
bit stronger in flavor.

Thank you both, Dan & Musashi, for your help. I knew I had read the
issue on Oilfish before, but couldn't recall the details and appreciated
your indulgences in my repeat question.

--
The First Nation people call him "Walking Eagle" because he's so full of
shit he can't fly anymore.


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Old 16-06-2005, 05:23 PM
Dan Logcher
 
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Default

George wrote:
Dan Logcher wrote:

George wrote:

My question is whether "white tuna" is traditional Japanese and what
would it be called if it is? I searched a bit on the web where it was
only referred to as white tuna.




It is albacore tuna, and called bincho maguro or shiro maguro.
It is very tender, a pinkish color, and rich flavor. I do not think
it is a traditional item, but it is becoming available all over.


I will have to ask my itamae when I get a chance and he's not so busy,
but the "white tuna" I was served was absolutely white with no pinkness
to it. My wife commented that it was almost too bland as she likes it a
bit stronger in flavor.


Was it firm texture or soft? If it was firm, oilfish. If it was soft,
ablacore.

Thank you both, Dan & Musashi, for your help. I knew I had read the
issue on Oilfish before, but couldn't recall the details and appreciated
your indulgences in my repeat question.


Hey, no problem.

--
Dan
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Old 16-06-2005, 05:35 PM
George
 
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Default

Dan Logcher wrote:
George wrote:

Dan Logcher wrote:

George wrote:

My question is whether "white tuna" is traditional Japanese and what
would it be called if it is? I searched a bit on the web where it
was only referred to as white tuna.




It is albacore tuna, and called bincho maguro or shiro maguro.
It is very tender, a pinkish color, and rich flavor. I do not think
it is a traditional item, but it is becoming available all over.


I will have to ask my itamae when I get a chance and he's not so busy,
but the "white tuna" I was served was absolutely white with no
pinkness to it. My wife commented that it was almost too bland as she
likes it a bit stronger in flavor.



Was it firm texture or soft? If it was firm, oilfish. If it was soft,
ablacore.

Thank you both, Dan & Musashi, for your help. I knew I had read the
issue on Oilfish before, but couldn't recall the details and
appreciated your indulgences in my repeat question.



Hey, no problem.

Thank you.

As we both recall, it was a bit difficult to bite right through as if it
had a bit of sinew in it. Otherwise, I would think that it was soft. But
that's a tough call as most fish, to me is soft as opposed to clams
which I consider firm to chewy. I'll get to the bottom of this next time
I'm there.

--
The First Nation people call him "Walking Eagle" because he's so full of
shit he can't fly anymore.
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Old 16-06-2005, 08:53 PM
Dan Logcher
 
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Default

George wrote:

As we both recall, it was a bit difficult to bite right through as if it
had a bit of sinew in it. Otherwise, I would think that it was soft. But
that's a tough call as most fish, to me is soft as opposed to clams
which I consider firm to chewy. I'll get to the bottom of this next time
I'm there.


Ok, then I would compare escolar to yellowtail in texture.
Albacore is just too soft to compare to any other fish that
I can think of..

Sushi neta that I consider firm are things like maguro, hamachi, aji,
and super white tuna (oilfish/escolar). It's a meaty texture..

--
Dan
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Old 18-06-2005, 02:03 PM
George
 
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Default

Dan Logcher wrote:
George wrote:


As we both recall, it was a bit difficult to bite right through as if
it had a bit of sinew in it. Otherwise, I would think that it was
soft. But that's a tough call as most fish, to me is soft as opposed
to clams which I consider firm to chewy. I'll get to the bottom of
this next time I'm there.



Ok, then I would compare escolar to yellowtail in texture.
Albacore is just too soft to compare to any other fish that
I can think of..

Sushi neta that I consider firm are things like maguro, hamachi, aji,
and super white tuna (oilfish/escolar). It's a meaty texture..

With those comparisons in mind, I guess it must have been Albacore.

--
The First Nation people call him "Walking Eagle" because he's so full of
shit he can't fly anymore.
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Old 19-06-2005, 06:39 AM
Geoff
 
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Default

Musashi wrote:
The softe shelled crabs started appearing here in the New York City suburbs
about 2 weeks ago.
I have eaten 5 crabs already.


I had them at Katsu-ya in Studio City (L.A.) on May 4th (no coincidence
intended) - so where did they come from?


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