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Old 25-02-2017, 01:49 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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From Wells Fargo Daily Advantage:

"Just about a week ago, two food industry trade groups announced
voluntary, standardized practices intended to clear up confusion about
10 separate label phrases such as Sell By, Use By, Expires On, Best
Before, Better if Used By, or Best By. Manufacturers are now encouraged
to use only two: "Best if Used By" and "Use By."

"Best If Used By" describes product quality: The product taste or
performance may suffer after the indicated date but is safe to consume
or use. "Use By" applies to highly perishable products and/or food
safety concerns. These products should be consumed by the date listed on
the package or disposed of after that date.

The promulgation of new labelling practices acknowledges that the rules
were left to manufacturers in the past, which may be at the root of
label proliferation. The new rules also appear to acknowledge that past
practices caused consumer confusion. A survey found 91% of consumers
mistakenly tossed food if the "Best if used by" label had passed, when
that only signals the manufacturer's guess at its peak quality.

The standards are voluntary, so there's no guarantee of adoption. In
addition, the roll-out offers great leeway for implementation that
extends to July 2018 for those manufacturers that adopt the standards."


This is a great initiative.


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Old 25-02-2017, 03:04 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On 2/24/2017 8:49 PM, Alex wrote:
From Wells Fargo Daily Advantage:



The new rules also appear to acknowledge that past
practices caused consumer confusion. A survey found 91% of consumers
mistakenly tossed food if the "Best if used by" label had passed, when
that only signals the manufacturer's guess at its peak quality.

The standards are voluntary, so there's no guarantee of adoption. In
addition, the roll-out offers great leeway for implementation that
extends to July 2018 for those manufacturers that adopt the standards."


This is a great initiative.


This is great. I get up every day at midnight and check to expiration
dates so I can toss the expired stuff.
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Old 25-02-2017, 02:53 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Sqwertz wrote:
On Fri, 24 Feb 2017 22:04:47 -0500, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

On 2/24/2017 8:49 PM, Alex wrote:
From Wells Fargo Daily Advantage:



The new rules also appear to acknowledge that past
practices caused consumer confusion. A survey found 91% of consumers
mistakenly tossed food if the "Best if used by" label had passed, when
that only signals the manufacturer's guess at its peak quality.

The standards are voluntary, so there's no guarantee of adoption. In
addition, the roll-out offers great leeway for implementation that
extends to July 2018 for those manufacturers that adopt the standards."


This is a great initiative.


This is great. I get up every day at midnight and check to expiration
dates so I can toss the expired stuff.


Soda I. But I do it an hour later because of the time zone thing.

-sw

I just found some butter in an other fridge that had a late 2015 date on
it, it was perfectly alright in the centre after I took 1/8" off all
round ( I then used the outside bit in a cake)
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Old 25-02-2017, 03:06 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On 2017-02-25, Alex wrote:

From Wells Fargo Daily Advantage:

"Just about a week ago, two food industry trade groups announced
voluntary, standardized practices intended to clear up confusion about
10 separate label phrases such as Sell By, Use By, Expires On, Best
Before, Better if Used By, or Best By. Manufacturers are now encouraged
to use only two: "Best if Used By" and "Use By."


Any bogus issue to avoid actually labelling food with the real
ingredients, including GMO foods. Apparently, it's OK to change the
labels 2-3 times a yr, like telling ppl pointless nonsense like how
this food is "new" and "improved" or when to toss this container and
buy another one. BUT, when having to show what's actually included,
well, that's gonna drive food prices through the roof and we will all
starve to death! Krikies!!

This is a great initiative.


If yer a complete moron.

nb
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Old 25-02-2017, 04:55 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On 2/24/2017 10:04 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:
On 2/24/2017 8:49 PM, Alex wrote:
From Wells Fargo Daily Advantage:



The new rules also appear to acknowledge that past
practices caused consumer confusion. A survey found 91% of consumers
mistakenly tossed food if the "Best if used by" label had passed, when
that only signals the manufacturer's guess at its peak quality.

The standards are voluntary, so there's no guarantee of adoption. In
addition, the roll-out offers great leeway for implementation that
extends to July 2018 for those manufacturers that adopt the standards."


This is a great initiative.


This is great. I get up every day at midnight and check to expiration
dates so I can toss the expired stuff.


Damn! I have some cream that expired two days ago. I missed the deadline!

People get so het up about these dates. Most of us know they're really
just a best guess. If you need a date stamp to tell you when food has
gone bad you really shouldn't be shopping for, or preparing, food.

There was a former poster here who used to throw away [what sounded
like] a lot of food based on those random dates. She's the type of
consumer this rule change is geared towards, to prevent the unnecessary
throwing out of perfectly good food.

Jill


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Old 25-02-2017, 08:06 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On Friday, February 24, 2017 at 3:50:00 PM UTC-10, Alex wrote:
From Wells Fargo Daily Advantage:

"Just about a week ago, two food industry trade groups announced
voluntary, standardized practices intended to clear up confusion about
10 separate label phrases such as Sell By, Use By, Expires On, Best
Before, Better if Used By, or Best By. Manufacturers are now encouraged
to use only two: "Best if Used By" and "Use By."

"Best If Used By" describes product quality: The product taste or
performance may suffer after the indicated date but is safe to consume
or use. "Use By" applies to highly perishable products and/or food
safety concerns. These products should be consumed by the date listed on
the package or disposed of after that date.

The promulgation of new labelling practices acknowledges that the rules
were left to manufacturers in the past, which may be at the root of
label proliferation. The new rules also appear to acknowledge that past
practices caused consumer confusion. A survey found 91% of consumers
mistakenly tossed food if the "Best if used by" label had passed, when
that only signals the manufacturer's guess at its peak quality.

The standards are voluntary, so there's no guarantee of adoption. In
addition, the roll-out offers great leeway for implementation that
extends to July 2018 for those manufacturers that adopt the standards."


This is a great initiative.


I don't need no stinkin' "best by" dating. I got my own thresholds. And anyway, having the ability to eat foods that aren't fresh is a useful survival strategy. I once had some steak that was way past fresh in the back of my refrigerator. It was all brown and dried up. It was a nice looking steak when fried and was the tenderest, tastiest, most memorable steak I ever had. It did taste a little funky but I dream about that piece of meat.

They should put a "best by" label on people. Some of them are way past their freshness date in their approach to life and other people.
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Old 25-02-2017, 08:09 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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"dsi1" wrote in message
...

On Friday, February 24, 2017 at 3:50:00 PM UTC-10, Alex wrote:
From Wells Fargo Daily Advantage:

"Just about a week ago, two food industry trade groups announced
voluntary, standardized practices intended to clear up confusion about
10 separate label phrases such as Sell By, Use By, Expires On, Best
Before, Better if Used By, or Best By. Manufacturers are now encouraged
to use only two: "Best if Used By" and "Use By."

"Best If Used By" describes product quality: The product taste or
performance may suffer after the indicated date but is safe to consume
or use. "Use By" applies to highly perishable products and/or food
safety concerns. These products should be consumed by the date listed on
the package or disposed of after that date.

The promulgation of new labelling practices acknowledges that the rules
were left to manufacturers in the past, which may be at the root of
label proliferation. The new rules also appear to acknowledge that past
practices caused consumer confusion. A survey found 91% of consumers
mistakenly tossed food if the "Best if used by" label had passed, when
that only signals the manufacturer's guess at its peak quality.

The standards are voluntary, so there's no guarantee of adoption. In
addition, the roll-out offers great leeway for implementation that
extends to July 2018 for those manufacturers that adopt the standards."


This is a great initiative.


I don't need no stinkin' "best by" dating. I got my own thresholds. And
anyway, having the ability to eat foods that aren't fresh is a useful
survival strategy. I once had some steak that was way past fresh in the back
of my refrigerator. It was all brown and dried up. It was a nice looking
steak when fried and was the tenderest, tastiest, most memorable steak I
ever had. It did taste a little funky but I dream about that piece of meat.

They should put a "best by" label on people. Some of them are way past their
freshness date in their approach to life and other people.

====

LOL I use my nose and experience to determine if something is still good to
eat

--
http://www.helpforheroes.org.uk

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Old 25-02-2017, 08:25 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On Saturday, February 25, 2017 at 9:55:59 AM UTC-7, Jill McQuown wrote:
On 2/24/2017 10:04 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:
On 2/24/2017 8:49 PM, Alex wrote:
From Wells Fargo Daily Advantage:



The new rules also appear to acknowledge that past
practices caused consumer confusion. A survey found 91% of consumers
mistakenly tossed food if the "Best if used by" label had passed, when
that only signals the manufacturer's guess at its peak quality.

The standards are voluntary, so there's no guarantee of adoption. In
addition, the roll-out offers great leeway for implementation that
extends to July 2018 for those manufacturers that adopt the standards."


This is a great initiative.


This is great. I get up every day at midnight and check to expiration
dates so I can toss the expired stuff.


Damn! I have some cream that expired two days ago. I missed the deadline!

People get so het up about these dates. Most of us know they're really
just a best guess. If you need a date stamp to tell you when food has
gone bad you really shouldn't be shopping for, or preparing, food.

There was a former poster here who used to throw away [what sounded
like] a lot of food based on those random dates. She's the type of
consumer this rule change is geared towards, to prevent the unnecessary
throwing out of perfectly good food.

Jill


I'm sure that "former poster" would find some way to get around the new rules
so that she/he could toss food because she/he loved to shop for more food.
I know people who just love shopping at the malls...personally I hate malls
with a passion. My wife had a helluva time getting me to go to them but the
kids were always gung ho.
=====
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Old 25-02-2017, 08:29 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On Sat, 25 Feb 2017 12:06:11 -0800 (PST), dsi1
wrote:

On Friday, February 24, 2017 at 3:50:00 PM UTC-10, Alex wrote:
From Wells Fargo Daily Advantage:

"Just about a week ago, two food industry trade groups announced
voluntary, standardized practices intended to clear up confusion about
10 separate label phrases such as Sell By, Use By, Expires On, Best
Before, Better if Used By, or Best By. Manufacturers are now encouraged
to use only two: "Best if Used By" and "Use By."

"Best If Used By" describes product quality: The product taste or
performance may suffer after the indicated date but is safe to consume
or use. "Use By" applies to highly perishable products and/or food
safety concerns. These products should be consumed by the date listed on
the package or disposed of after that date.

The promulgation of new labelling practices acknowledges that the rules
were left to manufacturers in the past, which may be at the root of
label proliferation. The new rules also appear to acknowledge that past
practices caused consumer confusion. A survey found 91% of consumers
mistakenly tossed food if the "Best if used by" label had passed, when
that only signals the manufacturer's guess at its peak quality.

The standards are voluntary, so there's no guarantee of adoption. In
addition, the roll-out offers great leeway for implementation that
extends to July 2018 for those manufacturers that adopt the standards."


This is a great initiative.


I don't need no stinkin' "best by" dating. I got my own thresholds. And anyway, having the ability to eat foods that aren't fresh is a useful survival strategy.


During a famine or a locust plague, you'd only be too happy with that
over the date food in the back of your pantry, right?
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Old 25-02-2017, 08:44 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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i can usually tell by Smell if something is ok to injest
[if questionable, just toss it]

i've used Canned goods many years after expiration dates

marc


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Old 25-02-2017, 09:18 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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21blackswan wrote:

i can usually tell by Smell if something is ok to injest.


There are many perfectly disease free foods that naturally smell awful
to the uninitiated, like cheeses, smoked fish, and certain tropical
fruits. Food contamination is like carbon monoxide, there is no odor.
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Old 25-02-2017, 09:19 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On Sat, 25 Feb 2017 16:18:43 -0500, Brooklyn1
wrote:

21blackswan wrote:

i can usually tell by Smell if something is ok to injest.


There are many perfectly disease free foods that naturally smell awful
to the uninitiated, like cheeses, smoked fish, and certain tropical
fruits. Food contamination is like carbon monoxide, there is no odor.


What if an egg is contaminated with rot?
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Old 25-02-2017, 09:25 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On Sun, 26 Feb 2017 08:19:51 +1100, Bruce
wrote:

On Sat, 25 Feb 2017 16:18:43 -0500, Brooklyn1
wrote:

21blackswan wrote:

i can usually tell by Smell if something is ok to injest.


There are many perfectly disease free foods that naturally smell awful
to the uninitiated, like cheeses, smoked fish, and certain tropical
fruits. Food contamination is like carbon monoxide, there is no odor.


What if an egg is contaminated with rot?


It'll smell terribly, like you, but won't cause disease
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Old 25-02-2017, 09:33 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On Sat, 25 Feb 2017 16:25:19 -0500, Brooklyn1
wrote:

On Sun, 26 Feb 2017 08:19:51 +1100, Bruce
wrote:

On Sat, 25 Feb 2017 16:18:43 -0500, Brooklyn1
wrote:

21blackswan wrote:

i can usually tell by Smell if something is ok to injest.

There are many perfectly disease free foods that naturally smell awful
to the uninitiated, like cheeses, smoked fish, and certain tropical
fruits. Food contamination is like carbon monoxide, there is no odor.


What if an egg is contaminated with rot?


It'll smell terribly, like you, but won't cause disease


How do you know?
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Old 25-02-2017, 09:37 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On Saturday, February 25, 2017 at 10:13:20 AM UTC-10, Ophelia wrote:
"dsi1" wrote in message
...

On Friday, February 24, 2017 at 3:50:00 PM UTC-10, Alex wrote:
From Wells Fargo Daily Advantage:

"Just about a week ago, two food industry trade groups announced
voluntary, standardized practices intended to clear up confusion about
10 separate label phrases such as Sell By, Use By, Expires On, Best
Before, Better if Used By, or Best By. Manufacturers are now encouraged
to use only two: "Best if Used By" and "Use By."

"Best If Used By" describes product quality: The product taste or
performance may suffer after the indicated date but is safe to consume
or use. "Use By" applies to highly perishable products and/or food
safety concerns. These products should be consumed by the date listed on
the package or disposed of after that date.

The promulgation of new labelling practices acknowledges that the rules
were left to manufacturers in the past, which may be at the root of
label proliferation. The new rules also appear to acknowledge that past
practices caused consumer confusion. A survey found 91% of consumers
mistakenly tossed food if the "Best if used by" label had passed, when
that only signals the manufacturer's guess at its peak quality.

The standards are voluntary, so there's no guarantee of adoption. In
addition, the roll-out offers great leeway for implementation that
extends to July 2018 for those manufacturers that adopt the standards."


This is a great initiative.


I don't need no stinkin' "best by" dating. I got my own thresholds. And
anyway, having the ability to eat foods that aren't fresh is a useful
survival strategy. I once had some steak that was way past fresh in the back
of my refrigerator. It was all brown and dried up. It was a nice looking
steak when fried and was the tenderest, tastiest, most memorable steak I
ever had. It did taste a little funky but I dream about that piece of meat.

They should put a "best by" label on people. Some of them are way past their
freshness date in their approach to life and other people.

====

LOL I use my nose and experience to determine if something is still good to
eat

--
http://www.helpforheroes.org.uk


Mostly it's a marketing scheme. A brilliant one at that.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gAXtjH3EmLs


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