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Old 05-06-2007, 02:48 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default 3 Ways In Which You Can Save Money And Enjoy Delicious Home Cooked Meals

3 Ways In Which You Can Save Money And Enjoy Delicious Home
Cooked Meals
by Katherine Saab


Top 4 Reasons to hire a Personal Chef.

This article will explain to you the benefits of hiring a
Personal Chef.


1. Save Money

You will save money. Instead of Eating out or Ordering in. You
will have delicious restaurant quality meals already prepared in
your home. For about half the cost.

2. Healthier

Eating in restaurants and From Take out Places, your options are
limited, especially if you are on a diet or have special dietary
needs. With a Personal Chef you can eat the foods you want to
eat, because the menu is one YOU plan!

3. Convenient

The Convenience of Having Fabulous Meals already at home waiting
for you at the end of the day.

Think about how many days you get home tired and can't decided
what to make or are simply too tired to prepare a meal, so you
order in. You have to wait sometimes an hour for that delivery.
With meals prepared for you by a personal chef, your meal is
already there all you have to do is heat it and enjoy!

Give it a Try what do you have to lose?

The foods prepared by Chef Devin are delicious, Health Concious
and definitely worth a try.

Chef Devin Page, Executive Chef, Author
Has been in the Restaurant/Hospitality Industry for over 26
years and has worked at various restaurants as both executive
chef and consulting chef, she has worked in catering and is well
versed in many cuisines as well as diets.



Chef Devin is also the Author of the ebook :
"How To Cook Like A Professional Chef Even If All You Have Ever
Done Is Burn Salad"

http://www.chefdevincooks.com

Copyright 2007 Katherine Saab. Please feel free to pass this
article on to your friends, or use it in your ezine or
newsletter. It's a shareware article.


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Old 05-06-2007, 10:14 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default 3 Ways In Which You Can Save Money And Enjoy Delicious Home Cooked Meals

In article ,
"jmcquown" wrote:

wrote:
3 Ways In Which You Can Save Money And Enjoy Delicious Home
Cooked Meals
by Katherine Saab


Top 4 Reasons to hire a Personal Chef.

Funny how the article says 4 reasons but the subject of the post says 3.
Apparently this "personal chef" can't count. I fail to see how paying
someone else do to the cooking is going to save money.

OB Food: Made a loaf of cornbread in my trusty cast iron skillet.

1 cup medium yellow cornmeal
1 c. white flour
up to 1/4 c. sugar (I use one Tablespoon)
4 tsp. baking powder
1/2 tsp. salt
1/4 c. butter, shortening or bacon grease
1 c. buttermilk
1 large egg, lightly beaten

Blend the dry ingredients in a mixing bowl; stir in the butter (softened),
shortening or bacon grease. Add the buttermilk and egg and stir well.
Mixture will be a little lumpy. Pour into a lightly greased pan (I use an
8" cast iron skillet or sectioned cast iron corn muffin pan). Bake at 425F
until golden brown, about 25 minutes.

Jill


And for those avoiding wheat flour:

Cornbread

1 cup cornmeal
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon soda
1 cup corn, cream-style
2 eggs; slightly beaten
2/3 cup buttermilk
1/3 cup shortening; melted
1 cup cheese, cheddar; shredded

Combine all ingredients, except shredded cheese, in a bowl. Mix well
and pour half the batter into a hot, greased 9" baking pan. Sprinkle
cheese on top, and cover with remaining batter. Bake at 375 degrees for
30 to 40 minutes.

Yield: 9 servings


** Exported from Now You're Cooking! v5.70 **
--
Peace, Om

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"My mother never saw the irony in calling me a Son of a bitch" -- Jack Nicholson
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Old 05-06-2007, 11:42 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default 3 Ways In Which You Can Save Money And Enjoy Delicious Home Cooked Meals

Omelet wrote:
In article ,
"jmcquown" wrote:

wrote:
3 Ways In Which You Can Save Money And Enjoy Delicious Home
Cooked Meals
by Katherine Saab


Top 4 Reasons to hire a Personal Chef.

Funny how the article says 4 reasons but the subject of the post
says 3. Apparently this "personal chef" can't count. I fail to see
how paying someone else do to the cooking is going to save money.

OB Food: Made a loaf of cornbread in my trusty cast iron skillet.

1 cup medium yellow cornmeal
1 c. white flour
up to 1/4 c. sugar (I use one Tablespoon)
4 tsp. baking powder
1/2 tsp. salt
1/4 c. butter, shortening or bacon grease
1 c. buttermilk
1 large egg, lightly beaten

Blend the dry ingredients in a mixing bowl; stir in the butter
(softened), shortening or bacon grease. Add the buttermilk and egg
and stir well. Mixture will be a little lumpy. Pour into a lightly
greased pan (I use an 8" cast iron skillet or sectioned cast iron
corn muffin pan). Bake at 425F until golden brown, about 25 minutes.

Jill


And for those avoiding wheat flour:

Cornbread

1 cup cornmeal
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon soda
1 cup corn, cream-style
2 eggs; slightly beaten
2/3 cup buttermilk
1/3 cup shortening; melted
1 cup cheese, cheddar; shredded

Combine all ingredients, except shredded cheese, in a bowl. Mix well
and pour half the batter into a hot, greased 9" baking pan. Sprinkle
cheese on top, and cover with remaining batter. Bake at 375 degrees
for 30 to 40 minutes.

Yield: 9 servings


I don't have a problem with flour but if you want to get into a cornbread
war we could add sliced jalapenos Or make corn muffins or even
cornsticks. I have a nice cast iron cornstick pan!

Just got soaking wet on the patio and no, it wasn't a wet t-shirt contest!
I was filling the birdbath and the jug I keep handy to fill the bird bath;
the hose got away from me and decided to dance all around. Remember those
silly toys from the 1960's? What was it called, the Wiggle Worm? (or
something like that). Felt good to be doused by the cold water considering
it's in the 90's this afternoon. It's gonna be a *hot* summer.

Jill




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Old 06-06-2007, 01:12 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
J S J S is offline
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Default 3 Ways In Which You Can Save Money And Enjoy Delic


3 Ways In Which You Can Save Money And Enjoy Delicious Home Cooked
Meals

Group: rec.food.cooking Date: Tue, Jun 5, 2007, 4:04pm (EDT-1) From:
(jmcquown)
OB Food: Made a loaf of cornbread --

Thamks for posting the corn bread recipe,Ive been looking for a good
one----Smitty

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Old 06-06-2007, 06:18 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default 3 Ways In Which You Can Save Money And Enjoy Delicious Home CookedMeals

Omelet wrote:

And for those avoiding wheat flour:

Cornbread

1 cup cornmeal
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon soda
1 cup corn, cream-style
2 eggs; slightly beaten
2/3 cup buttermilk
1/3 cup shortening; melted
1 cup cheese, cheddar; shredded

Combine all ingredients, except shredded cheese, in a bowl. Mix well
and pour half the batter into a hot, greased 9" baking pan. Sprinkle
cheese on top, and cover with remaining batter. Bake at 375 degrees for
30 to 40 minutes.


I make it here without wheat flour, without buttermilk, creamed corn or
cheddar, none of which one can buy. I use polenta. It's good and quite
surprises Italians when they eat it. I brought an iron skillet with me,
and love the crust it makes.

--
Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com

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Old 06-06-2007, 06:29 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default 3 Ways In Which You Can Save Money And Enjoy Delicious Home Cooked Meals

In article ,
"jmcquown" wrote:

I don't have a problem with flour but if you want to get into a cornbread
war we could add sliced jalapenos Or make corn muffins or even
cornsticks. I have a nice cast iron cornstick pan!


Not a cornbread war luv, it's just that the lower GI I can make it, the
better. :-)

I also have a cast iron corn stick pan but it's not been used in ages!
Peppers are popular to add but I personally don't care for that.


Just got soaking wet on the patio and no, it wasn't a wet t-shirt contest!
I was filling the birdbath and the jug I keep handy to fill the bird bath;
the hose got away from me and decided to dance all around. Remember those
silly toys from the 1960's? What was it called, the Wiggle Worm? (or
something like that). Felt good to be doused by the cold water considering
it's in the 90's this afternoon. It's gonna be a *hot* summer.

Jill


I understand! It's getting to be a bit blistering hot here too so I
don't mind getting hit with the reciprocating sprinkler.
--
Peace, Om

Remove _ to validate e-mails.

"My mother never saw the irony in calling me a Son of a bitch" -- Jack Nicholson
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Old 06-06-2007, 06:43 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default 3 Ways In Which You Can Save Money And Enjoy Delicious Home Cooked Meals

One time on Usenet, Omelet said:
In article ,
"jmcquown" wrote:


I don't have a problem with flour but if you want to get into a cornbread
war we could add sliced jalapenos Or make corn muffins or even
cornsticks. I have a nice cast iron cornstick pan!


Ooooh, I've always wanted to try cornsticks. Do you add peppers to
those? And how do you serve them?

Not a cornbread war luv, it's just that the lower GI I can make it, the
better. :-)

I also have a cast iron corn stick pan but it's not been used in ages!
Peppers are popular to add but I personally don't care for that.


I do, and cheese as well. I posted a baked corn recipe a few months
ago that used cornmeal. I added canned roasted green chilis and some
shredded cheddar -- yum! Unfortunately, DH & DS did not share my
fondness for it, but I'm still going to play with it. Maybe a bit
of sour cream in the batter, hmmm...

--
Jani in WA
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Old 06-06-2007, 07:14 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default 3 Ways In Which You Can Save Money And Enjoy Delicious Home Cooked Meals

In article ,
Giusi wrote:

Omelet wrote:

And for those avoiding wheat flour:

Cornbread

1 cup cornmeal
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon soda
1 cup corn, cream-style
2 eggs; slightly beaten
2/3 cup buttermilk
1/3 cup shortening; melted
1 cup cheese, cheddar; shredded

Combine all ingredients, except shredded cheese, in a bowl. Mix well
and pour half the batter into a hot, greased 9" baking pan. Sprinkle
cheese on top, and cover with remaining batter. Bake at 375 degrees for
30 to 40 minutes.


I make it here without wheat flour, without buttermilk, creamed corn or
cheddar, none of which one can buy. I use polenta. It's good and quite
surprises Italians when they eat it. I brought an iron skillet with me,
and love the crust it makes.


I can get Polenta. :-)

I can also get pre-made Masa.

What is your process please?
--
Peace, Om

Remove _ to validate e-mails.

"My mother never saw the irony in calling me a Son of a bitch" -- Jack Nicholson


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Old 06-06-2007, 07:27 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default 3 Ways In Which You Can Save Money And Enjoy Delicious Home CookedMeals

Omelet wrote:
In article ,
Giusi wrote:


I make it here without wheat flour, without buttermilk, creamed corn or
cheddar, none of which one can buy. I use polenta. It's good and quite
surprises Italians when they eat it. I brought an iron skillet with me,
and love the crust it makes.


I can get Polenta. :-)

I can also get pre-made Masa.

What is your process please?


Much like yours except I use an all cornmeal recipe from Better Homes
and Gardens cookbook from 1960 which I dragged along to Italy.

Masa is available in Rome which is an all day trip and it is pricey. I
often wonder why when they sell this stuff to serve the foreign
population of caregivers and gardeners they charge so much for it.

OTH, maple syrup from Canada really isn't so much costlier here, but is
bought by the richer expats.

--
Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com

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Old 06-06-2007, 07:42 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default 3 Ways In Which You Can Save Money And Enjoy Delicious Home Cooked Meals

In article ,
Giusi wrote:

Omelet wrote:
In article ,
Giusi wrote:


I make it here without wheat flour, without buttermilk, creamed corn or
cheddar, none of which one can buy. I use polenta. It's good and quite
surprises Italians when they eat it. I brought an iron skillet with me,
and love the crust it makes.


I can get Polenta. :-)

I can also get pre-made Masa.

What is your process please?


Much like yours except I use an all cornmeal recipe from Better Homes
and Gardens cookbook from 1960 which I dragged along to Italy.


I did another file search and found two more flourless recipes on file
that I've collected, one is called Arkansas corn bread made without the
canned corn or cheese.

That will probably work.


Masa is available in Rome which is an all day trip and it is pricey. I
often wonder why when they sell this stuff to serve the foreign
population of caregivers and gardeners they charge so much for it.


Masa is cheap here, it's used to make Tamales. There are also whole
fresh frozen hogs heads sold around the holidays for the same purpose.
Hogs head tamales really are better than pork shoulder roast tamales. I
don't make them myself but have enough Hispanic co-workers, I can get
authentic tamales from them for about $7.00 per dozen.


OTH, maple syrup from Canada really isn't so much costlier here, but is
bought by the richer expats.


It's been awhile since I've purchased it so I can't name a current
price. The health food stores sell it as a bulk item for a better price
than pre-packaged. Mom used to always expand pure maple syrup by cutting
it with a simple syrup made from raw (turbinado) sugar.

I bought a box of bacon ends and pieces the other day so I'm revving up
to make a pot of black soybeans using a bacon stock. :-) It's a several
day process and I'd really like to make corn bread to go with it. Since
I do my level best to live a low carb lifestyle, I don't make cornbread
as a regular meal item. In fact, it's been at least 6 years since I've
made it.

It goes SO well with pork and beans tho'!

Black soy beans are the only true low-carb bean and the nutritional
breakdown almost reads like science fiction. Prepared properly with a
long pre-soak, the flavor and texture is similar to pinto beans.
--
Peace, Om

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"My mother never saw the irony in calling me a Son of a bitch" -- Jack Nicholson
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Old 06-06-2007, 08:09 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default 3 Ways In Which You Can Save Money And Enjoy Delicious Home CookedMeals

Omelet wrote:
In article ,
Giusi wrote:



What is your process please?

Much like yours except I use an all cornmeal recipe from Better Homes
and Gardens cookbook from 1960 which I dragged along to Italy.


I did another file search and found two more flourless recipes on file
that I've collected, one is called Arkansas corn bread made without the
canned corn or cheese.


I am originally from Maine and our cornbread never had white flour in it.



Masa is cheap here, it's used to make Tamales.


That's what I use it for because corn tortillas don't exist here and one
must make them. Some Texans once brought me 100 in a bag and they
lasted 1.5 years!



Black soy beans are the only true low-carb bean and the nutritional
breakdown almost reads like science fiction. Prepared properly with a
long pre-soak, the flavor and texture is similar to pinto beans.


I just do the low carb thin every winter at Lent-- not for religious
reasons but just because it is an easy definite period to choose. 40
days and finished. I love canellini too much to give them up, but don't
cook them with fat or meat. Chickpeas, too. In central Italy the bean
is at least a pretender to the throne.

--
Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com

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Old 06-06-2007, 08:19 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default 3 Ways In Which You Can Save Money And Enjoy Delicious Home Cooked Meals

In article ,
Giusi wrote:

Omelet wrote:
In article ,
Giusi wrote:



What is your process please?
Much like yours except I use an all cornmeal recipe from Better Homes
and Gardens cookbook from 1960 which I dragged along to Italy.


I did another file search and found two more flourless recipes on file
that I've collected, one is called Arkansas corn bread made without the
canned corn or cheese.


I am originally from Maine and our cornbread never had white flour in it.


Regional difference are always interesting. :-)
Cornbread seems to be a very versatile recipe.




Masa is cheap here, it's used to make Tamales.


That's what I use it for because corn tortillas don't exist here and one
must make them. Some Texans once brought me 100 in a bag and they
lasted 1.5 years!


Oh man. Corn tortillas are SO cheap here!
I wonder if they'd make it past customs before they got moldy?




Black soy beans are the only true low-carb bean and the nutritional
breakdown almost reads like science fiction. Prepared properly with a
long pre-soak, the flavor and texture is similar to pinto beans.


I just do the low carb thin every winter at Lent-- not for religious
reasons but just because it is an easy definite period to choose. 40
days and finished. I love canellini too much to give them up, but don't
cook them with fat or meat. Chickpeas, too. In central Italy the bean
is at least a pretender to the throne.


:-)
--
Peace, Om

Remove _ to validate e-mails.

"My mother never saw the irony in calling me a Son of a bitch" -- Jack Nicholson
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Old 06-06-2007, 10:24 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default 3 Ways In Which You Can Save Money And Enjoy Delicious Home Cooked Meals

Giusi wrote:
Omelet wrote:
In article ,
Giusi wrote:



What is your process please?
Much like yours except I use an all cornmeal recipe from Better
Homes and Gardens cookbook from 1960 which I dragged along to Italy.


I did another file search and found two more flourless recipes on
file that I've collected, one is called Arkansas corn bread made
without the canned corn or cheese.


I am originally from Maine and our cornbread never had white flour in
it.

But do you add sugar? I was up in Massachusettes (as close as I ever got to
Maine!) a number of years ago. One of my best friends married a guy from
Boston and moved up there. When I went to visit we were walking around
downtown and stopped in a pub for a cold beer. For some reason they were
giving out cornbread muffins to the patrons, which struck me as odd. She
cautioned me before I took a bite, "You're not going to like it! It's
sweet!" Sure enough, it had so much sugar in it it tasted more like cake
than a quick bread made with cornmeal.

Jill




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