Barbecue (alt.food.barbecue) Discuss barbecue and grilling--southern style "low and slow" smoking of ribs, shoulders and briskets, as well as direct heat grilling of everything from burgers to salmon to vegetables.

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Old 30-10-2009, 03:17 AM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Default Sweet Potato Fries

This ain't smoking or grilling, so please don't flame me.

A while backi, I decided that our typical favorite for pulled
pork: baked sweet potato served hollowed out with brown sugar and
cinnamon in the pit, might be something to be improved upon.
After a few experiments (none of God's creatures were harmed in
these experiment), here's what Mrs. Nonny has declared to be the
"locked in" recipe. Variations are permitted, but only if she's
not told about them. grin

1 medium sweet potato for 1-2 people

3/4 cup non-packed Parmesan cheese, shaved
1 tbsp chili powder
1 tbsp brown sugar
1 tbsp dry bread crumbs

Cruet with 2 tbsp catsup and 1 tsp or less Siracciasp? sauce

Place the cheese and stuff in a tupperware container and shake
like crazy to combine all ingredients- set aside refrigerated

Nuke sweet potato about 8 minutes until barely fork tender. Peel
and gently roll out between your hands to make solid
Cut potato into 1/3" strips and arrange tightly on baking sheet,
sprayed with Pam. Spray surface of sweet potato fingers with Pam
as well. Sprinkly to cover with cheese blend.

Place under broiling pan in oven broiler and go as long as you can
before burning the cheese. The longer the crisper and the better.

The sweet potato fingers can be deep fat fried, if you have a
fryer going. They're even better if you shake them in a bag of
potato flour or potato starch, but that's up to you.



--
Nonny

Have you ever wondered if the bills
in your wallet were ever in a stripper's butt crack?
Have a nice day ..




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Old 30-10-2009, 09:13 AM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Default Sweet Potato Fries

excellent, Lee

--
Have a wonderful day

"Nonny" wrote in message
...
This ain't smoking or grilling, so please don't flame me.

A while backi, I decided that our typical favorite for pulled pork: baked
sweet potato served hollowed out with brown sugar and cinnamon in the pit,
might be something to be improved upon. After a few experiments (none of
God's creatures were harmed in these experiment), here's what Mrs. Nonny
has declared to be the "locked in" recipe. Variations are permitted, but
only if she's not told about them. grin

1 medium sweet potato for 1-2 people

3/4 cup non-packed Parmesan cheese, shaved
1 tbsp chili powder
1 tbsp brown sugar
1 tbsp dry bread crumbs

Cruet with 2 tbsp catsup and 1 tsp or less Siracciasp? sauce

Place the cheese and stuff in a tupperware container and shake like crazy
to combine all ingredients- set aside refrigerated

Nuke sweet potato about 8 minutes until barely fork tender. Peel and
gently roll out between your hands to make solid
Cut potato into 1/3" strips and arrange tightly on baking sheet, sprayed
with Pam. Spray surface of sweet potato fingers with Pam as well.
Sprinkly to cover with cheese blend.

Place under broiling pan in oven broiler and go as long as you can before
burning the cheese. The longer the crisper and the better.

The sweet potato fingers can be deep fat fried, if you have a fryer going.
They're even better if you shake them in a bag of potato flour or potato
starch, but that's up to you.



--
Nonny

Have you ever wondered if the bills
in your wallet were ever in a stripper's butt crack?
Have a nice day ..





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Old 30-10-2009, 09:49 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Default Sweet Potato Fries


"Nunya Bidnits" wrote in
message ...
Nonny said:


Nuke sweet potato about 8 minutes until barely fork tender.
Peel
and gently roll out between your hands to make solid



Can you elaborate? I don't follow what you were doing there.


I found it necessary to remove the skin from the sweet potatoes
before running them through my "residential-grade" french fry
cutter. They're too hard, without softening to go through without
excessive and damaging force to the plastic cutter. If I had a
good SS or cast french fry cutter, then I'd do them raw and
include the skin, since I love the skin of a potato and feel it
adds to both the flavor, texture and nutrition. By "nuke," of
course I refer to the microwave oven, which I use to soften the
sweet potatoes. After peeling off the skin, following a nuke, the
sweet potato is pretty chewed up, so I round it back up before
using the fry cutter.

With the way this explanation is going, Marty, I might also see
what it's like if I used a potato peeler and did the skin with it
BEFORE softening the sweet potatoes. I just never tried it, so I
have no opinion. . . yet. grin




Cut potato into 1/3" strips and arrange tightly on baking
sheet,
sprayed with Pam. Spray surface of sweet potato fingers with
Pam
as well. Sprinkly to cover with cheese blend.

Place under broiling pan in oven broiler and go as long as you
can
before burning the cheese. The longer the crisper and the
better.

The sweet potato fingers can be deep fat fried, if you have a
fryer going. They're even better if you shake them in a bag of
potato flour or potato starch, but that's up to you.


The Parmesan mix doesn't make a mess in the deep fryer? I'd
think some
coating would be pretty important.


Again, I'm guilty of a bad explanation. I've experimented with
frying, but then laid them out on the baking sheet THEN added the
sprinkle and did a quick trip through the broiler.



I'll divert to my latest love in deep frying, tempura-panko
coating.
Whatever it is (usually shrimp, mushrooms, or onion rings around
here, going
to try it on chicken wings next) gets prepped as follows:

Kikkoman dry tempura mix (I use a commercial pack but I'm pretty
sure it's
available in a grocer pack too)

equal amount of ice cold "sparkling" water (I added the
sparkling part, not
called for by label)

Panko style bread crumbs

Season food as desired. Dredge pieces in some dry tempura mix
just until
very lightly coated.

Mix equal amounts of water and tempura mix. It will foam up.
Stir only until
the foam subsides and dry mix incorporated, do not over mix.

Dip each piece of food in the tempura, shake off excess, and
quickly lay it
in the panko, one side, then the other. Don't try to mush it
around in there
or you'll just ruin the panko with the batter. Start with small
amounts of
panko, and if you start getting a lot of big clumps, pull them
out and add
more crumbs.

Set food on a rack as you finish, but don't hold, fry as soon as
you finish,
or you can drop one basketfull while you dredge up the next.

Fry each batch at about 340F for 3-4 minutes.

The resulting coating is a great combination of delicious crunch
and the
subtle puffiness of tempura.

I'm thinking the sweet potato recipe above would be very
interesting with
this treatment. Chances are it will happen soon.


Since it sounds like you have a handy fryer and use it frequently,
give this a try and let me know what you think:

Cut the sweet potato (raw) into fry-shaped strips using a knife or
commercial fry cutter and then shake them in POTATO flour. Deep
fry. This might give you less of an oily taste and the flour
would brown up/crisp up well.




Now for longer cooking foods, like chicken, I can't give time
and temp.
Typically jumbo wings have to go 8-9 minutes at a lower temp,
say 330-335,
and when I've deep fried with panko in the past, that's been too
long to
prevent it from getting too dark and somewhat burnt tasting,
definitely over
crunchy.

Has anyone used panko for deep frying longer cooking items like
chicken?
Comments?

MartyB in KC


Have you tried it using 2 stages? Fry the wings a bit "naked,"
then remove, drain, dip and fry more.
--
Nonny

Have you ever wondered if the bills
in your wallet were ever in a stripper's butt crack?
Have a nice day ..



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Old 30-10-2009, 11:05 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Default Sweet Potato Fries


On 30-Oct-2009, "Nonny" wrote:

Xref: unlimited.usenetmonster.com alt.food.barbecue:147750


"Nunya Bidnits" wrote in
message ...
Nonny said:


Nuke sweet potato about 8 minutes until barely fork tender.
Peel
and gently roll out between your hands to make solid



Can you elaborate? I don't follow what you were doing there.


I found it necessary to remove the skin from the sweet potatoes
before running them through my "residential-grade" french fry
cutter. They're too hard, without softening to go through without
excessive and damaging force to the plastic cutter. If I had a
good SS or cast french fry cutter, then I'd do them raw and
include the skin, since I love the skin of a potato and feel it
adds to both the flavor, texture and nutrition. By "nuke," of
course I refer to the microwave oven, which I use to soften the
sweet potatoes. After peeling off the skin, following a nuke, the
sweet potato is pretty chewed up, so I round it back up before
using the fry cutter.

With the way this explanation is going, Marty, I might also see
what it's like if I used a potato peeler and did the skin with it
BEFORE softening the sweet potatoes. I just never tried it, so I
have no opinion. . . yet. grin


.. . .

Try the potato peeler first Nonny, but then wrap your sweet tater
with parchment paper (so it won't stick) and then with a kitchen
towel before nuking. You get a lot more control over the nuking
that way and more even heating through the potato. Don't use
towels that you're proud of. Sometimes they get scorched. I did
bakers that way (sans the paper) for years until I got this little
toaster oven. Even now, I'll nuke a baker if I'm in a hurry. I like
real oven roasted taters, but I'm not a potato snob.

--
Brick (Youth is wasted on young people)
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Old 30-10-2009, 11:42 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Default Sweet Potato Fries


"Brick" wrote in message
ter.com...

On 30-Oct-2009, "Nonny" wrote:

Xref: unlimited.usenetmonster.com alt.food.barbecue:147750


"Nunya Bidnits" wrote
in
message ...
Nonny said:


Nuke sweet potato about 8 minutes until barely fork tender.
Peel
and gently roll out between your hands to make solid


Can you elaborate? I don't follow what you were doing there.


I found it necessary to remove the skin from the sweet potatoes
before running them through my "residential-grade" french fry
cutter. They're too hard, without softening to go through
without
excessive and damaging force to the plastic cutter. If I had a
good SS or cast french fry cutter, then I'd do them raw and
include the skin, since I love the skin of a potato and feel it
adds to both the flavor, texture and nutrition. By "nuke," of
course I refer to the microwave oven, which I use to soften the
sweet potatoes. After peeling off the skin, following a nuke,
the
sweet potato is pretty chewed up, so I round it back up before
using the fry cutter.

With the way this explanation is going, Marty, I might also see
what it's like if I used a potato peeler and did the skin with
it
BEFORE softening the sweet potatoes. I just never tried it, so
I
have no opinion. . . yet. grin


. . .

Try the potato peeler first Nonny, but then wrap your sweet
tater
with parchment paper (so it won't stick) and then with a kitchen
towel before nuking. You get a lot more control over the nuking
that way and more even heating through the potato. Don't use
towels that you're proud of. Sometimes they get scorched. I did
bakers that way (sans the paper) for years until I got this
little
toaster oven. Even now, I'll nuke a baker if I'm in a hurry. I
like
real oven roasted taters, but I'm not a potato snob.

--
Brick (Youth is wasted on young people)


Thanks for the good advice (as always), Brick. FWIW, I ordered
the Weston FF cutter today, along with a 1/2, 3/8 and 1/4"
cutters. It seems to be a well regarded one of cast iron that
should hold up to the sweet potatoes, including skin, I hope.
I'll keep the little POS plastic one for hard boiled eggs. grin

--
Nonny

Have you ever wondered if the bills
in your wallet were ever in a stripper's butt crack?
Have a nice day ..





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Old 31-10-2009, 03:19 AM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Default Sweet Potato Fries


"Nonny" wrote in message
Thanks for the good advice (as always), Brick. FWIW, I ordered the Weston
FF cutter today, along with a 1/2, 3/8 and 1/4" cutters. It seems to be a
well regarded one of cast iron that should hold up to the sweet potatoes,
including skin, I hope. I'll keep the little POS plastic one for hard
boiled eggs. grin


That's a serious cutter. I've cut sweet potatoes by hand and cooked them
raw as opposed to nuking, but I may try your method to make the cooking
process a bit faster. We like them with red pepper, but I'm going to have
to try your recipe. Sounds very good.


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Old 31-10-2009, 05:37 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Default Sweet Potato Fries


On 31-Oct-2009, "Nonny" wrote:

Xref: unlimited.usenetmonster.com alt.food.barbecue:147752


"Brick" wrote in message


.. . .


Thanks for the good advice (as always), Brick. FWIW, I ordered
the Weston FF cutter today, along with a 1/2, 3/8 and 1/4"
cutters. It seems to be a well regarded one of cast iron that
should hold up to the sweet potatoes, including skin, I hope.
I'll keep the little POS plastic one for hard boiled eggs. grin

--
Nonny


I've always wanted a decent french fry cutter, but never would
part with the money. I have one of those POS plastic ones
myself, but find myself usually cutting them by hand. I only
do a couple of potatoes at a time, so it doesn't take long.

--
Brick (Youth is wasted on young people)
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Old 31-10-2009, 06:37 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Default Sweet Potato Fries


"Nunya Bidnits" wrote in message

When you deep fry yams, do you double cook them like french fries, a
partial
cook till they are limp, pull and rest, then finish in hotter oil?

Not necessary for premade frozen fries, of course, those have already been
partially cooked, but I wondered if the technique works for sweet potato
fries too.

MartyB


I've not dried the double method on them, but it should work. They don't
get as crispy as regular potatoes.


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Old 01-11-2009, 03:49 AM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Default Sweet Potato Fries


On 31-Oct-2009, "Ed Pawlowski" wrote:

"Nunya Bidnits" wrote in message

When you deep fry yams, do you double cook them like french fries, a
partial
cook till they are limp, pull and rest, then finish in hotter oil?

Not necessary for premade frozen fries, of course, those have already
been
partially cooked, but I wondered if the technique works for sweet
potato
fries too.

MartyB


Yes but! The double fry technique is used to get rid of the excess
moisture in the potatoes that drags the oil temperature down. By
prefrying you get rid of much of the water leaving a potato that
is ready to be fried in hot oil. When re-introduced to the fryer
the temperature doesn't drop radically, thus allowing your food
to fry properly. Sweet potatoes don't contain nearly so much
water to begin with, so the benefit is less apparent. I'll still double
fry, but use shorter timing for sweet potatoes.

You of course are encouraged to do as you please. (YMMV)

--
Brick (Youth is wasted on young people)
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Old 01-11-2009, 05:33 AM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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"Nunya Bidnits" wrote in message

That's the difference because I seldom reheat foods on plates. Most of my
plates are some kind of stoneware and they don't perform well in the
microwave, getting way too hot and drawing off a lot of the energy
intended
for heating food. So if I'm using a nuke I'll reheat foods in individual
containers, usually the same ones they were stored in, and then plate them
up.


This time of year I usually put the plates in the oven for a few minutes to
warm up. Especially nice with delicate foods, like an egg.



I probably take more time using the nuke than most people anyway, because
I
seldom use full power, and stop and start some foods to check them during
the process, sometimes even with rests between bursts. I find the food
heats
more evenly that way with fewer of the hot spots that destroy flavor and
texture.

MartyB

That's the way it should be done. Resting time in an important function
when microwave cooking but most people just want high power and fast with no
consideration of quality.




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Old 01-11-2009, 05:54 AM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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On 1-Nov-2009, "Nunya Bidnits"
wrote:

Nonny said:
"Nunya Bidnits" wrote in
message ...
Nonny said:
"Brick" wrote in message


.. . .


That's the difference because I seldom reheat foods on plates. Most of my
plates are some kind of stoneware and they don't perform well in the
microwave, getting way too hot and drawing off a lot of the energy
intended
for heating food. So if I'm using a nuke I'll reheat foods in individual
containers, usually the same ones they were stored in, and then plate
them
up.

I probably take more time using the nuke than most people anyway, because
I
seldom use full power, and stop and start some foods to check them during
the process, sometimes even with rests between bursts. I find the food
heats
more evenly that way with fewer of the hot spots that destroy flavor and
texture.

MartyB


I have a love/hate relationship with my microwave. I cannot reheat in
Gladware/Tupperware because they melt while I am not watching.
I use glass, corelle and corning ware with and without covers depending
on the situation. I also use low power and start/stop techniques. Oddly
enough, the micowave makes great meatloaf if you use a glass bunt pan.

--
Brick (Youth is wasted on young people)
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Old 02-11-2009, 12:39 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Default Sweet Potato Fries

now there's a recipe i would love to see, Lee

--
Have a great day
"Brick" wrote in message
ster.com...

On 1-Nov-2009, "Nunya Bidnits"
wrote:

Nonny said:
"Nunya Bidnits" wrote in
message ...
Nonny said:
"Brick" wrote in message


. . .


That's the difference because I seldom reheat foods on plates. Most of my
plates are some kind of stoneware and they don't perform well in the
microwave, getting way too hot and drawing off a lot of the energy
intended
for heating food. So if I'm using a nuke I'll reheat foods in individual
containers, usually the same ones they were stored in, and then plate
them
up.

I probably take more time using the nuke than most people anyway, because
I
seldom use full power, and stop and start some foods to check them during
the process, sometimes even with rests between bursts. I find the food
heats
more evenly that way with fewer of the hot spots that destroy flavor and
texture.

MartyB


I have a love/hate relationship with my microwave. I cannot reheat in
Gladware/Tupperware because they melt while I am not watching.
I use glass, corelle and corning ware with and without covers depending
on the situation. I also use low power and start/stop techniques. Oddly
enough, the micowave makes great meatloaf if you use a glass bunt pan.

--
Brick (Youth is wasted on young people)



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Old 02-11-2009, 12:42 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Default Sweet Potato Fries

i think the best deep fried sweet potato deep fried to date for me is the
tempura, sp sweet potatoes at our local chinese buffett, Lee

--
Have a great day
"Brick" wrote in message
ster.com...

On 31-Oct-2009, "Ed Pawlowski" wrote:

"Nunya Bidnits" wrote in message

When you deep fry yams, do you double cook them like french fries, a
partial
cook till they are limp, pull and rest, then finish in hotter oil?

Not necessary for premade frozen fries, of course, those have already
been
partially cooked, but I wondered if the technique works for sweet
potato
fries too.

MartyB


Yes but! The double fry technique is used to get rid of the excess
moisture in the potatoes that drags the oil temperature down. By
prefrying you get rid of much of the water leaving a potato that
is ready to be fried in hot oil. When re-introduced to the fryer
the temperature doesn't drop radically, thus allowing your food
to fry properly. Sweet potatoes don't contain nearly so much
water to begin with, so the benefit is less apparent. I'll still double
fry, but use shorter timing for sweet potatoes.

You of course are encouraged to do as you please. (YMMV)

--
Brick (Youth is wasted on young people)



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Old 02-11-2009, 02:56 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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On 2-Nov-2009, "Stormmmee" wrote:

now there's a recipe i would love to see, Lee

--
Have a great day


Gee, I've never considered a recipe for meatloaf. It just is.

Gather together some;
Ground beef
Ground pork
Onion (Can't cook anything without onion)
Bell Pepper
Egg(s)
Bread crumbs
Garlic (Can't cook anything without garlic either)
Catsup
S & P

Mix two parts of ground beef with one part of ground pork. Add an egg
for every 1.5 pounds of meat. Use a half cup each of chopped onion and
pepper for each pound of meat. Mix in enough catsup to give some color
to the mix. Finally mix in enough bread crumbs to firm up the mix. It's not
critical, but you don't want to leave it too soupy. Season to taste. Herbs
are beneficial if you have them. I like a few red pepper flakes in mine,
but not enough to add heat. Bake uncovered on high until the loaf begins
to pull away from the edges of the pan. If you use a regular oven, bake
at 325F to 350F.

You don't have to use a bundt pan to cook meatloaf, but it does help
to distribute the heat more evenly for a decent texture all the way
through.
You can use a loaf pan if you like or even just mould the meat into a loaf
and cook it that way.

Anybody wants to help me out, feel free to jump in here.

--
Brick (Youth is wasted on young people)
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Old 02-11-2009, 05:03 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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"Brick" wrote in message
ster.com...

On 2-Nov-2009, "Stormmmee" wrote:

now there's a recipe i would love to see, Lee

--
Have a great day


Gee, I've never considered a recipe for meatloaf. It just is.

Gather together some;
Ground beef
Ground pork
Onion (Can't cook anything without onion)
Bell Pepper
Egg(s)
Bread crumbs
Garlic (Can't cook anything without garlic either)
Catsup
S & P

Mix two parts of ground beef with one part of ground pork. Add
an egg
for every 1.5 pounds of meat. Use a half cup each of chopped
onion and
pepper for each pound of meat. Mix in enough catsup to give some
color
to the mix. Finally mix in enough bread crumbs to firm up the
mix. It's not
critical, but you don't want to leave it too soupy. Season to
taste. Herbs
are beneficial if you have them. I like a few red pepper flakes
in mine,
but not enough to add heat. Bake uncovered on high until the
loaf begins
to pull away from the edges of the pan. If you use a regular
oven, bake
at 325F to 350F.

You don't have to use a bundt pan to cook meatloaf, but it does
help
to distribute the heat more evenly for a decent texture all the
way
through.
You can use a loaf pan if you like or even just mould the meat
into a loaf
and cook it that way.

Anybody wants to help me out, feel free to jump in here.


I'm not chiming in with anything from experience, but my Mom used
to add in about 1/3 ground veal, saying that the veal would puff
up and make the meatloaf lighter. I once heard that the guys who
make hot dogs that are supposed to puff up and split the skin use
veal for that reason as well. I'd be interested in anybody's
thoughts on that.

--
Nonny

Have you ever wondered if the bills
in your wallet were ever in a stripper's butt crack?
Have a nice day ..





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