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Old 09-08-2017, 12:41 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Am Mittwoch, 9. August 2017 12:40:26 UTC+2 schrieb Janet:
In article ,
says...

I'm going to a pot luck this weekend. Grilled chicken will be provided,
as well as drinks. Not sure what to bring. Any ideas??


Ratatouille.

it can be served cold so if the host is hassled there's no need to
fuss about in the kitchen reheating.

it's a safe choice for any vegetarians, but meat eaters love it too and
it goes with grilled chicken.

if there's any left over it'll be even better the next day

if you have a glut of tomatoes and zucchini it'll be really cheap to
make.

http://www.jamieoliver.com/recipes/v...c-ratatouille/


Excellent idea!
I use a bit laurel and oregano, too. No lemon, but some pure apple juice
when it's cooked down quite far.
Easily done in a rice cooker ...

Another way to get rid of zucchini in a pleasant way:

Zucchini, Korean style

Ingredients:
1 1/2 pounds zucchini (any size as long as the skin isn't really hard)
3 Tbs neutral cooking oil (I prefer sunflower seed)
3 garlic cloves (or as many as you prefer)
3 longish red peppers (hot or mild; depends on your taste) "
1 dash roasted Sesame seed oil
3 Tbs sugar (or less)
5 Tbs soy Sauce or
1 Ts salt
2-4 Tbs unflavored Vinegar

Wash zucchini, trim the ends, half or quarter lengthwise (depending on the
size), cut up diagonally in slices of 1/4 to 1/3 inch.
Heat up the neutral oil in a large pan/skillet with the garlic halved
lengthwise and the peppers halved diagonally or whole. Don't brown the
garlic much, it tends to get bitter otherwise!
Add the zucchini and the sugar, stir and let them brown a bit, stir again,
reduce the heat, add soy sauce or salt and vinegar and let simmer until
the zucchini are done and most of the liquid has evaporated.
Adjust salt/sweet/sour to taste.
Serve at any temperature, sprinkled with toasted sesame seeds.
Keeps very well in an air-tight container in the fridge and gets even
better then. Therefore, you may multiply the amounts used - left-overs
are no problem. If there happen to be any, that is...

You may prepare dried and hydrated shiitake, stems removed, the same way.
Or lotus roots.

Bye, Sanne.

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Old 09-08-2017, 12:51 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On 8/9/2017 6:50 AM, Cindy Hamilton wrote:
On Tuesday, August 8, 2017 at 6:40:06 PM UTC-4, tert in seattle wrote:
I'm going to a pot luck this weekend. Grilled chicken will be provided,
as well as drinks. Not sure what to bring. Any ideas??

thanks


Tabouli or some other vegetable-heavy dish. I don't ever seem to be
able to get enough vegetables at potlucks; it's always meats and
carbs as far as the eye can see.

Maybe that's because I'm in the Midwest...

Cindy Hamilton

The pot lucks I've attended were always heavy on desserts and pasta
salad and potato salad. It's hard to say without knowing what else is
in the lineup other than grilled chicken. Side dishes? How about Chex
Snack mix? Potato chips and dip.

We had a lot of pot lucks at work. We had a sign-up sheet specifiying
what was already being provided. Bring one of the missing items. Fresh
greens/salad was usually one of them. The men who didn't cook
invariably signed up to bring paper plates, plastic knives/forks and
napkins. The company started providing those so they had to figure out
something else. It's not easy, unless you know what other people are
already bringing.

Jill
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Old 09-08-2017, 01:34 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On Wed, 9 Aug 2017 07:51:07 -0400, jmcquown
wrote:

On 8/9/2017 6:50 AM, Cindy Hamilton wrote:
On Tuesday, August 8, 2017 at 6:40:06 PM UTC-4, tert in seattle wrote:
I'm going to a pot luck this weekend. Grilled chicken will be provided,
as well as drinks. Not sure what to bring. Any ideas??

thanks


Tabouli or some other vegetable-heavy dish. I don't ever seem to be
able to get enough vegetables at potlucks; it's always meats and
carbs as far as the eye can see.

Maybe that's because I'm in the Midwest...

Cindy Hamilton

The pot lucks I've attended were always heavy on desserts and pasta
salad and potato salad. It's hard to say without knowing what else is
in the lineup other than grilled chicken. Side dishes? How about Chex
Snack mix? Potato chips and dip.

We had a lot of pot lucks at work. We had a sign-up sheet specifiying
what was already being provided. Bring one of the missing items. Fresh
greens/salad was usually one of them. The men who didn't cook
invariably signed up to bring paper plates, plastic knives/forks and
napkins. The company started providing those so they had to figure out
something else. It's not easy, unless you know what other people are
already bringing.

Jill


We didn't do pot lucks at work, we would all agree on a menu and a
price, and food was purchased and prepared in the shop kitchen or
outdoors on a large grill and in large pots... the welders made the
large cooking equipment.
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Old 09-08-2017, 01:54 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On 2017-08-08 6:39 PM, tert in seattle wrote:
I'm going to a pot luck this weekend. Grilled chicken will be provided,
as well as drinks. Not sure what to bring. Any ideas??



How about prosciutto and melon. When we threw a big party for my wife's
birthday that was one of the things I prepared and it was a big hit.
Melons are good at this time of the year. It's easy enough to throw
together and despite the high cost per pound for prosciutto, it is cut
so thin that it doesn't take much.
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Old 09-08-2017, 02:03 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On 8/9/2017 8:34 AM, wrote:
On Wed, 9 Aug 2017 07:51:07 -0400, jmcquown
wrote:

On 8/9/2017 6:50 AM, Cindy Hamilton wrote:
On Tuesday, August 8, 2017 at 6:40:06 PM UTC-4, tert in seattle wrote:
I'm going to a pot luck this weekend. Grilled chicken will be provided,
as well as drinks. Not sure what to bring. Any ideas??

thanks

Tabouli or some other vegetable-heavy dish. I don't ever seem to be
able to get enough vegetables at potlucks; it's always meats and
carbs as far as the eye can see.

Maybe that's because I'm in the Midwest...

Cindy Hamilton

The pot lucks I've attended were always heavy on desserts and pasta
salad and potato salad. It's hard to say without knowing what else is
in the lineup other than grilled chicken. Side dishes? How about Chex
Snack mix? Potato chips and dip.

We had a lot of pot lucks at work. We had a sign-up sheet specifiying
what was already being provided. Bring one of the missing items. Fresh
greens/salad was usually one of them. The men who didn't cook
invariably signed up to bring paper plates, plastic knives/forks and
napkins. The company started providing those so they had to figure out
something else. It's not easy, unless you know what other people are
already bringing.

Jill


We didn't do pot lucks at work, we would all agree on a menu and a
price, and food was purchased and prepared in the shop kitchen or
outdoors on a large grill and in large pots... the welders made the
large cooking equipment.

I was one of those "office workers" you seem to deplore. We had pot
lucks frequently. The company provided the meat, the employees brought
the side dishes. Desserts (store bought pies and cakes) seemed to be
most common.

Jill


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Old 09-08-2017, 02:08 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On 2017-08-09 12:28 AM, Wayne Boatwright wrote:
On Tue 08 Aug 2017 08:21:21p, tert in seattle told us...



Certain people in our social group predictably bring things like buns,
chips, jarred salsa, peper and plastic goods, etc., of which are
certainly useful, but always purchased with little effort to offer.


A friend of ours used to host pot luck parties but he only invited
people who he knew would bring interesting dishes. Just this week I
read an advice column letter from someone wondering how to deal with a
friend whose contribution to their groups pot luck meals were
insultingly cheap, like a bowl of rice. I disagreed with the advice,
which was to accept it graciously and thank her. I would be more likely
to exclude her.



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Old 09-08-2017, 02:53 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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l not -l wrote:


* Exported from MasterCook *

Brown Buttered Corn

Recipe By :Melissa Clark
Serving Size : 0 Preparation Time :0:00
Categories :

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method
-------- ------------ --------------------------------
3 ears corn -- shucked
4 tablespoons butter
4 sprigs thyme -- preferably lemon thyme
Coarse sea salt
Freshly ground black pepper
Chopped fresh soft herbs (basil -- mint,
parsley, cilantro), optional

Break ears of corn in half and stand one half vertically on a
cutting board. Using a sawing motion, run a knife between cob and
kernels to remove kernels. Using back of knife, scrape denuded
cob to release corn's juices. Transfer kernels and juice to a
bowl. Repeat with remaining corn.

Melt butter in a saucepan; add thyme. Let butter cook until you
see golden brown specks in bottom of pan and butter smells nutty,
about 5 minutes. Add corn, juices and a large pinch of salt and
pepper; stir well and cover pot. Let cook until corn is tender,
about 5 minutes.

Remove thyme sprigs, add more salt and pepper if desired, and
serve hot, alone or as a side dish, garnished with herbs if
desired.

Description:
"This side dish is easier than corn on the cob. Fresh corn
kernels are cooked in butter browned so that it takes on a deep
caramelized flavor."
Source:
"New York Times, Food section"
S(Internet Address):
"https://cooking.nytimes.com/recipes/1018599-brown-buttered-corn"
Yield:
"4 servings"
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - -



I saved this recipe. Almost what I do with fresh corn anyway
but with a few additions.

Don't bother breaking ears in half first though. That would
be a pain in the butt. I hold a whole ear and cut off the
bottom 2/3 first, then reverse and cut off the remaining 1/3.
One ear of corn yields a very generous pile of corn for
one serving.

I always cut fresh corn off the cob and eat or bag it
to freeze later on. I just microwave it and add some butter.

Next time I'll try your way. Brown the butter (I do this for
eggs all the time) and add some thyme and probably a bit of
basil. Stir that all up until hot. Sounds very tasty to me.

G.
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Old 09-08-2017, 03:01 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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I bring a large crockpot of baked beans.

Denise in NH
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Old 09-08-2017, 03:06 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On 2017-08-09, jmcquown wrote:

I was one of those "office workers" you seem to deplore. We had pot
lucks frequently. The company provided the meat, the employees brought
the side dishes. Desserts (store bought pies and cakes) seemed to be
most common.


I gave up on "work" pot lucks cuz everyone brought store-bought junk
or worse. What's worse? Take-out pizza, take-out Chinese, Chicken
buckets, etc. It was like nobody knew how to cook.

The only dish I ever saw that was home-cooked was some mamasita baked
two(2) goats heads for the Holloween pot-luck. She even put the
eyeballs back in. Those heads were scary, to be sure, but myself and
my Vietnamese engineer buddy loved every bit. We ate the flesh,
mostly from the head (cabeza), and had both heads to ourselves.
Mmmmmm..... Good eats!

Now, our local pot-lucks are all home cooked. My mac n' cheese is a
requested dish.

nb
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Old 09-08-2017, 03:17 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Janet wrote:

says...
actually I'm thinking I'll do my latest fetish, tomato cucumber yogurt
salad


;-) I'd eat that. Lovely on a hot day.


hmmm. I've never described a dish as "lovely."
Mars vs Venus, I suppose.


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Old 09-08-2017, 03:18 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Dave Smith wrote:

A friend of ours used to host pot luck parties but he only invited
people who he knew would bring interesting dishes. Just this week I
read an advice column letter from someone wondering how to deal with a
friend whose contribution to their groups pot luck meals were
insultingly cheap, like a bowl of rice. I disagreed with the advice,
which was to accept it graciously and thank her. I would be more likely
to exclude her.


Evidently not many asians at that pot luck meal.
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Old 09-08-2017, 03:30 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On 8/9/2017 10:06 AM, notbob wrote:
On 2017-08-09, jmcquown wrote:

I was one of those "office workers" you seem to deplore. We had pot
lucks frequently. The company provided the meat, the employees brought
the side dishes. Desserts (store bought pies and cakes) seemed to be
most common.


I gave up on "work" pot lucks cuz everyone brought store-bought junk
or worse. What's worse? Take-out pizza, take-out Chinese, Chicken
buckets, etc. It was like nobody knew how to cook.


Probably 50% don't know how, 49% are too lazy to do it.


The only dish I ever saw that was home-cooked was some mamasita baked
two(2) goats heads for the Holloween pot-luck. She even put the
eyeballs back in. Those heads were scary, to be sure, but myself and
my Vietnamese engineer buddy loved every bit. We ate the flesh,
mostly from the head (cabeza), and had both heads to ourselves.
Mmmmmm..... Good eats!

Now, our local pot-lucks are all home cooked. My mac n' cheese is a
requested dish.

nb


The goat head sounds good. I'd pass on the eyeballs but the cheek meat
would be good.
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Old 09-08-2017, 04:31 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On Tue, 8 Aug 2017 23:08:40 GMT, "l not -l" wrote:


On 8-Aug-2017, tert in seattle wrote:

I'm going to a pot luck this weekend. Grilled chicken will be
provided,
as well as drinks. Not sure what to bring. Any ideas??

thanks

Brown Buttered Corn.


* Exported from MasterCook *

Brown Buttered Corn

Recipe By :Melissa Clark
Serving Size : 0 Preparation Time :0:00
Categories :

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method
-------- ------------ --------------------------------
3 ears corn -- shucked
4 tablespoons butter
4 sprigs thyme -- preferably lemon thyme
Coarse sea salt
Freshly ground black pepper
Chopped fresh soft herbs (basil -- mint,
parsley, cilantro), optional

Break ears of corn in half and stand one half vertically on a
cutting board. Using a sawing motion, run a knife between cob and
kernels to remove kernels. Using back of knife, scrape denuded
cob to release corn's juices. Transfer kernels and juice to a
bowl. Repeat with remaining corn.

Melt butter in a saucepan; add thyme. Let butter cook until you
see golden brown specks in bottom of pan and butter smells nutty,
about 5 minutes. Add corn, juices and a large pinch of salt and
pepper; stir well and cover pot. Let cook until corn is tender,
about 5 minutes.

Remove thyme sprigs, add more salt and pepper if desired, and
serve hot, alone or as a side dish, garnished with herbs if
desired.

Description:
"This side dish is easier than corn on the cob. Fresh corn
kernels are cooked in butter browned so that it takes on a deep
caramelized flavor."
Source:
"New York Times, Food section"
S(Internet Address):
"https://cooking.nytimes.com/recipes/1018599-brown-buttered-corn"
Yield:
"4 servings"
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
- - - -

Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 686 Calories; 50g Fat
(60.8% calories from fat); 11g Protein; 62g Carbohydrate; 14g
Dietary Fiber; 124mg Cholesterol; 518mg Sodium. Exchanges: 4
Grain(Starch); 9 1/2 Fat.

Serving Ideas : Try it with these roasted fish fillets.


Nutr. Assoc. : 0 0 0 0 0 0


I went past this recipe a couple of times before I really got to
thinking about it. I've now saved it. Hopefully I will get to try it
for real next year (hoping my corn crop comes through then).
Meanwhile I am going to put it on my list of variations for the winter
using frozen corn. I know the little scraped nubbins will be missing
but I think this approach is a good idea. Thanks
Janet US
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Old 09-08-2017, 04:37 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On Tue, 8 Aug 2017 22:39:53 +0000 (UTC), tert in seattle
wrote:

I'm going to a pot luck this weekend. Grilled chicken will be provided,
as well as drinks. Not sure what to bring. Any ideas??

thanks


How about something like this?

BLACK BEAN SALAD

2 cans black beans, rinsed and drained
Frozen corn or fresh, equal to black beans
Chopped red pepper
Chopped green pepper
Chopped onion
Chopped, seeded, fresh tomatoes
Anaheim chopped
Jalapeno chopped
Cilantro chopped
Garlic minced
Lime juice
Salt and pepper
Maybe a smidge of cumin

There are many ideas like this out there. This is just the way I make
it. Look for Black Bean Salad, Corn Salad, Bean and Corn Salad. Lots
of variations using seasonal ingredients.

Janet US


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