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Old 09-08-2017, 05:39 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On Wednesday, August 9, 2017 at 10:30:27 AM UTC-4, Ed Pawlowski wrote:
On 8/9/2017 10:06 AM, notbob wrote:
On 2017-08-09, jmcquown wrote:

I was one of those "office workers" you seem to deplore. We had pot
lucks frequently. The company provided the meat, the employees brought
the side dishes. Desserts (store bought pies and cakes) seemed to be
most common.


I gave up on "work" pot lucks cuz everyone brought store-bought junk
or worse. What's worse? Take-out pizza, take-out Chinese, Chicken
buckets, etc. It was like nobody knew how to cook.


Probably 50% don't know how, 49% are too lazy to do it.


And 1% don't have time to put together a dish after work
the night before or in the morning.

That's always my beef with work potlucks. I usually skip
them for that reason, and because everybody (even the ones
who cook) bring such carb-y stuff.

Cindy Hamilton

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Old 09-08-2017, 06:03 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On 2017-08-09 10:18 AM, Gary wrote:
Dave Smith wrote:

A friend of ours used to host pot luck parties but he only invited
people who he knew would bring interesting dishes. Just this week I
read an advice column letter from someone wondering how to deal with a
friend whose contribution to their groups pot luck meals were
insultingly cheap, like a bowl of rice. I disagreed with the advice,
which was to accept it graciously and thank her. I would be more likely
to exclude her.


Evidently not many asians at that pot luck meal.


Why? Are Asians so cheap that they would boil up 20 cents worth of rice
and consider it to be a contribution to a meal for a gathering of friends?

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Old 09-08-2017, 06:32 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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l not -l wrote:

On 8-Aug-2017, tert in seattle wrote:

l not -l wrote:


{snip}

Description:
"This side dish is easier than corn on the cob. Fresh corn

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

kernels are cooked in butter browned so that it takes on a
deep
caramelized flavor."
Source:
"New York Times, Food section"
S(Internet Address):
"https://cooking.nytimes.com/recipes/1018599-brown-buttered-corn"
Yield:
"4 servings"
- - - - - - - - - - - - -
- -
- - - -

Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 686 Calories; 50g Fat
(60.8% calories from fat); 11g Protein; 62g Carbohydrate; 14g
Dietary Fiber; 124mg Cholesterol; 518mg Sodium. Exchanges: 4
Grain(Starch); 9 1/2 Fat.

Serving Ideas : Try it with these roasted fish fillets.


Nutr. Assoc. : 0 0 0 0 0 0



what do those NYT people know - easier than corn on the cobb my

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
butt!

^^^^


Alll I have to contribute, in addition to the recipe itself, is,
I made it, it was not difficult and it was greatly enjoyed by
all, and there were request to do it again. While corn on the
cob can be prepared by a trained chimp, this recipe is


"This side dish is easier than corn on the cob."

a child, and perhaps a trained chimp, can see the error here

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Old 09-08-2017, 06:38 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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jmcquown wrote:
On 8/9/2017 6:50 AM, Cindy Hamilton wrote:
On Tuesday, August 8, 2017 at 6:40:06 PM UTC-4, tert in seattle wrote:
I'm going to a pot luck this weekend. Grilled chicken will be provided,
as well as drinks. Not sure what to bring. Any ideas??

thanks


Tabouli or some other vegetable-heavy dish. I don't ever seem to be
able to get enough vegetables at potlucks; it's always meats and
carbs as far as the eye can see.

Maybe that's because I'm in the Midwest...

Cindy Hamilton

The pot lucks I've attended were always heavy on desserts and pasta
salad and potato salad. It's hard to say without knowing what else is
in the lineup other than grilled chicken. Side dishes? How about Chex
Snack mix? Potato chips and dip.

We had a lot of pot lucks at work. We had a sign-up sheet specifiying
what was already being provided. Bring one of the missing items. Fresh
greens/salad was usually one of them. The men who didn't cook
invariably signed up to bring paper plates, plastic knives/forks and
napkins.


what about the womwn who didn't cook?



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Old 09-08-2017, 06:39 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Dave Smith wrote:
On 2017-08-08 6:39 PM, tert in seattle wrote:
I'm going to a pot luck this weekend. Grilled chicken will be provided,
as well as drinks. Not sure what to bring. Any ideas??



How about prosciutto and melon. When we threw a big party for my wife's
birthday that was one of the things I prepared and it was a big hit.
Melons are good at this time of the year. It's easy enough to throw
together and despite the high cost per pound for prosciutto, it is cut
so thin that it doesn't take much.


I don't get the whole proscioutto with melon thing

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Old 09-08-2017, 06:51 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On Wednesday, August 9, 2017 at 3:07:29 AM UTC-10, Dave Smith wrote:
On 2017-08-09 12:28 AM, Wayne Boatwright wrote:
On Tue 08 Aug 2017 08:21:21p, tert in seattle told us...



Certain people in our social group predictably bring things like buns,
chips, jarred salsa, peper and plastic goods, etc., of which are
certainly useful, but always purchased with little effort to offer.


A friend of ours used to host pot luck parties but he only invited
people who he knew would bring interesting dishes. Just this week I
read an advice column letter from someone wondering how to deal with a
friend whose contribution to their groups pot luck meals were
insultingly cheap, like a bowl of rice. I disagreed with the advice,
which was to accept it graciously and thank her. I would be more likely
to exclude her.


I would bring Asian potato salad for potluck - it's interesting stuff! Potlucks over here are kinda odd cause always get choke food.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BZsBqNJywFs&t=259s
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Old 09-08-2017, 06:52 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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I cook them in the oven, the conventional way, but transfer the beans to a crockpot for transport and to keep them hot at the buffet

Denise in NH
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Old 09-08-2017, 07:18 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On 2017-08-09 1:39 PM, tert in seattle wrote:
Dave Smith wrote:
On 2017-08-08 6:39 PM, tert in seattle wrote:
I'm going to a pot luck this weekend. Grilled chicken will be provided,
as well as drinks. Not sure what to bring. Any ideas??



How about prosciutto and melon. When we threw a big party for my wife's
birthday that was one of the things I prepared and it was a big hit.
Melons are good at this time of the year. It's easy enough to throw
together and despite the high cost per pound for prosciutto, it is cut
so thin that it doesn't take much.


I don't get the whole proscioutto with melon thing


I like it. I can tell you that at our outdoor party on a hot summer day
it was eaten up in no time and I made up another batch.

BTW.... my son had suggested sliced watermelon as well. It goes down
nicely on a hot summer day.

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Old 09-08-2017, 08:06 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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"dsi1" wrote in message
...

On Wednesday, August 9, 2017 at 3:07:29 AM UTC-10, Dave Smith wrote:
On 2017-08-09 12:28 AM, Wayne Boatwright wrote:
On Tue 08 Aug 2017 08:21:21p, tert in seattle told us...



Certain people in our social group predictably bring things like buns,
chips, jarred salsa, peper and plastic goods, etc., of which are
certainly useful, but always purchased with little effort to offer.


A friend of ours used to host pot luck parties but he only invited
people who he knew would bring interesting dishes. Just this week I
read an advice column letter from someone wondering how to deal with a
friend whose contribution to their groups pot luck meals were
insultingly cheap, like a bowl of rice. I disagreed with the advice,
which was to accept it graciously and thank her. I would be more likely
to exclude her.


I would bring Asian potato salad for potluck - it's interesting stuff!
Potlucks over here are kinda odd cause always get choke food.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BZsBqNJywFs&t=259s

==

lol I like that bloke He is funny


--
http://www.helpforheroes.org.uk



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Old 09-08-2017, 08:46 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On Wednesday, August 9, 2017 at 11:39:58 AM UTC-5, Cindy Hamilton wrote:

On 8/9/2017 10:06 AM, notbob wrote:

I gave up on "work" pot lucks cuz everyone brought store-bought junk
or worse. What's worse? Take-out pizza, take-out Chinese, Chicken
buckets, etc. It was like nobody knew how to cook.


Probably 50% don't know how, 49% are too lazy to do it.


And 1% don't have time to put together a dish after work
the night before or in the morning.

That's always my beef with work potlucks. I usually skip
them for that reason, and because everybody (even the ones
who cook) bring such carb-y stuff.

Cindy Hamilton


My last position in the company I worked for was in the computer
room and it was shift work 3 days per week. 6:00 a.m. until 7:30
p.m. when on the day shift. The first year or so somebody was
always wanting to do some sort of potluck dinner while working
these hours. I told them no, I would not be participating after
being up for 14+ hours to stop at the store and then go home and
cook something.

If they wanted to do some sort of potluck meal then they should
let everybody know the week BEFORE. Everybody could hit the store
while off work and then cook and have it ready to bring to work.

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Old 09-08-2017, 09:16 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On Wed, 9 Aug 2017 17:39:46 +0000 (UTC), tert in seattle
wrote:

Dave Smith wrote:
On 2017-08-08 6:39 PM, tert in seattle wrote:
I'm going to a pot luck this weekend. Grilled chicken will be provided,
as well as drinks. Not sure what to bring. Any ideas??



How about prosciutto and melon. When we threw a big party for my wife's
birthday that was one of the things I prepared and it was a big hit.
Melons are good at this time of the year. It's easy enough to throw
together and despite the high cost per pound for prosciutto, it is cut
so thin that it doesn't take much.


I don't get the whole proscioutto with melon thing


Me neither... I like melon but Ithink proscioutto is absolutely
flavorless... I don't care that it's pricey, I wouldn't eat it were it
free... I think people swoon over proscioutto for the same reason that
they swoon over the emperor's new clothes.
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Old 09-08-2017, 09:19 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On 8/9/2017 1:38 PM, tert in seattle wrote:
jmcquown wrote:
On 8/9/2017 6:50 AM, Cindy Hamilton wrote:
On Tuesday, August 8, 2017 at 6:40:06 PM UTC-4, tert in seattle wrote:
I'm going to a pot luck this weekend. Grilled chicken will be provided,
as well as drinks. Not sure what to bring. Any ideas??

thanks

Tabouli or some other vegetable-heavy dish. I don't ever seem to be
able to get enough vegetables at potlucks; it's always meats and
carbs as far as the eye can see.

Maybe that's because I'm in the Midwest...

Cindy Hamilton

The pot lucks I've attended were always heavy on desserts and pasta
salad and potato salad. It's hard to say without knowing what else is
in the lineup other than grilled chicken. Side dishes? How about Chex
Snack mix? Potato chips and dip.

We had a lot of pot lucks at work. We had a sign-up sheet specifiying
what was already being provided. Bring one of the missing items. Fresh
greens/salad was usually one of them. The men who didn't cook
invariably signed up to bring paper plates, plastic knives/forks and
napkins.


what about the womwn who didn't cook?

They brought paper plates, plastic cutlery and napkins, too. I was
talking about a work pot luck. It was usually the men who were the ones
who didn't cook. Things got difficult when the company started stocking
tableware. Uh oh, a pot luck! Better run to a bakery! Find a cake or
a pie! I only knew a few men who actually cooked. I'll never forget
one man whose wife brought in a pan of homemade Spanikopita. He was so
proud! It was delicious, but he acted like *he'd* done something. No,
his wife showed up with a baking dish...

Jill
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Old 09-08-2017, 10:04 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On 8/9/2017 4:30 PM, Wayne Boatwright wrote:
On Wed 09 Aug 2017 01:19:58p, jmcquown told us...

On 8/9/2017 1:38 PM, tert in seattle wrote:
jmcquown wrote:
On 8/9/2017 6:50 AM, Cindy Hamilton wrote:
On Tuesday, August 8, 2017 at 6:40:06 PM UTC-4, tert in seattle
wrote:
I'm going to a pot luck this weekend. Grilled chicken will be
provided, as well as drinks. Not sure what to bring. Any
ideas??

thanks

Tabouli or some other vegetable-heavy dish. I don't ever seem
to be able to get enough vegetables at potlucks; it's always
meats and carbs as far as the eye can see.

Maybe that's because I'm in the Midwest...

Cindy Hamilton

The pot lucks I've attended were always heavy on desserts and
pasta salad and potato salad. It's hard to say without knowing
what else is in the lineup other than grilled chicken. Side
dishes? How about Chex Snack mix? Potato chips and dip.

We had a lot of pot lucks at work. We had a sign-up sheet
specifiying what was already being provided. Bring one of the
missing items. Fresh greens/salad was usually one of them. The
men who didn't cook invariably signed up to bring paper plates,
plastic knives/forks and napkins.

what about the womwn who didn't cook?

They brought paper plates, plastic cutlery and napkins, too. I
was talking about a work pot luck. It was usually the men who
were the ones who didn't cook. Things got difficult when the
company started stocking tableware. Uh oh, a pot luck! Better
run to a bakery! Find a cake or a pie! I only knew a few men who
actually cooked. I'll never forget one man whose wife brought in
a pan of homemade Spanikopita. He was so proud! It was
delicious, but he acted like *he'd* done something. No, his wife
showed up with a baking dish...

Jill


Well, he apparently convinced his wife to make the spanikopita. I
have made it and it's really not that hard to make, but I consider it
tedious. I love to eat it. :-)

Yeah, he convinced his wife to make it. I love spanikopita but can't be
bothered with buttering sheets of phyllo dough. I'd have just made a
quiche.

Jill
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Old 09-08-2017, 10:57 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On Wed, 9 Aug 2017 09:03:34 -0400, jmcquown
wrote:

On 8/9/2017 8:34 AM, wrote:
On Wed, 9 Aug 2017 07:51:07 -0400, jmcquown
wrote:

On 8/9/2017 6:50 AM, Cindy Hamilton wrote:
On Tuesday, August 8, 2017 at 6:40:06 PM UTC-4, tert in seattle wrote:
I'm going to a pot luck this weekend. Grilled chicken will be provided,
as well as drinks. Not sure what to bring. Any ideas??

thanks

Tabouli or some other vegetable-heavy dish. I don't ever seem to be
able to get enough vegetables at potlucks; it's always meats and
carbs as far as the eye can see.

Maybe that's because I'm in the Midwest...

Cindy Hamilton

The pot lucks I've attended were always heavy on desserts and pasta
salad and potato salad. It's hard to say without knowing what else is
in the lineup other than grilled chicken. Side dishes? How about Chex
Snack mix? Potato chips and dip.

We had a lot of pot lucks at work. We had a sign-up sheet specifiying
what was already being provided. Bring one of the missing items. Fresh
greens/salad was usually one of them. The men who didn't cook
invariably signed up to bring paper plates, plastic knives/forks and
napkins. The company started providing those so they had to figure out
something else. It's not easy, unless you know what other people are
already bringing.

Jill


We didn't do pot lucks at work, we would all agree on a menu and a
price, and food was purchased and prepared in the shop kitchen or
outdoors on a large grill and in large pots... the welders made the
large cooking equipment.

I was one of those "office workers" you seem to deplore. We had pot
lucks frequently. The company provided the meat, the employees brought
the side dishes. Desserts (store bought pies and cakes) seemed to be
most common.

Jill


I have never considered office personnel as workers, they are
nonproductive overhead that make work. The computer was promoted as
something that would reduce paper and paper pushers but just the
opposite has occured... "office worker" is an oxymoron.

Today I had a doctor appointment... I spent 45 minutes driving to the
office. While there I met with four different office personnel. I
was handed 22 pages of paperwork on a cdlipboard to fill out that took
me 2 hours to complete... took them ten full minutes to find me a pen.
Teh only thing I did that I considered productive was going down the
hall to have an x-ray. There were 6-7 patents in the waiting room but
there were more than 20 office personnel... the most difficult work
they did was to find me a pen that wrote. Was a totally wasted day,
they could have/should have emailed me the paperwork to fill out at
home. I actually had to write my name, today's date, my phone number,
my birthday, my age, and insurance info on the top of all 22 pages...
if they didn't have everyone fill out 22 pages of redundencies
they'd have pens that wrote.

I drove home for another 45 minutes and never saw a doctor. Not ten
minutes ago my phone rang and I was given an appointment to see the
doctor, next week. Paper pushers, yik

This was the same doctor who treated me ten years ago for back pain, a
neurosurgeon. Ten years was good milage on epidural shots. But then
I didn't need to go through all the rigamorole, gotta blame the
obomination awfuss personal make paperwork program. Awfuss personel
is NOT legitimate employment, a welder is legitimate employment but
never awfuss personel. I'd pay someone to mop floors and clean
toilets but never to sit on their fat ass and push paper.


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