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Old 08-08-2013, 05:34 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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I've recently switched to an electrical stove, and there's something that bugs the living daylights out of me. Namely, heat transference.

The elements are metal, and so are the pans. Neither of these is particularly pliable, which means that there's very little actual surface contact between the two, so there's probably a hell of a lot of heat loss.

So my question is, is there anything to help with that, like some sort of soft, heat-conductive pad that goes between the two to help with heat transference {for the computer-wise, basically thermal paste, except in solid form}.

Or anything else that works, really.

Regards,

Quinch

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Old 09-08-2013, 07:18 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On Thursday, August 8, 2013 11:34:39 AM UTC-5, Quinch wrote:

I've recently switched to an electrical stove, and there's something that bugs the living daylights out of me. Namely, heat transference.



The elements are metal, and so are the pans. Neither of these is particularly pliable, which means that there's very little actual surface contact between the two, so there's probably a hell of a lot of heat loss.



So my question is, is there anything to help with that, like some sort of soft, heat-conductive pad that goes between the two to help with heat transference {for the computer-wise, basically thermal paste, except in solid form}.



Or anything else that works, really.



Regards,



Quinch



Aren't your pans flat bottomed?

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Old 09-08-2013, 05:25 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On Thursday, August 8, 2013 12:34:39 PM UTC-4, Quinch wrote:
I've recently switched to an electrical stove, and there's something that bugs the living daylights out of me. Namely, heat transference.

The elements are metal, and so are the pans. Neither of these is particularly pliable, which means that there's very little actual surface contact between the two, so there's probably a hell of a lot of heat loss.

So my question is, is there anything to help with that, like some sort of soft, heat-conductive pad that goes between the two to help with heat transference {for the computer-wise, basically thermal paste, except in solid form}.

Or anything else that works, really.

Regards,

Quinch


Surely electric heats by radiation and convection, very little
conduction. You don't want conduction heating as it will accentuate hot spots. Gas heats by convection.

http://www.richardfisher.com
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Old 09-08-2013, 06:13 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On 8/8/2013 6:34 AM, Quinch wrote:
I've recently switched to an electrical stove, and there's something that bugs the living daylights out of me. Namely, heat transference.

The elements are metal, and so are the pans. Neither of these is particularly pliable, which means that there's very little actual surface contact between the two, so there's probably a hell of a lot of heat loss.

So my question is, is there anything to help with that, like some sort of soft, heat-conductive pad that goes between the two to help with heat transference {for the computer-wise, basically thermal paste, except in solid form}.

Or anything else that works, really.

Regards,

Quinch


There's nothing like that as far as I know. At least you're getting
better heat transfer than gas. If you want the most efficient method of
cooking you'd pretty much have to go with an induction range or cook
with microwave. The cheapest to operate would still be gas any way you
look at it. People should be looking at ways to improve the efficiency
of gas but it's so cheap that there's little interest.
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Old 09-08-2013, 06:42 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On 8/9/2013 1:13 PM, dsi1 wrote:
On 8/8/2013 6:34 AM, Quinch wrote:
I've recently switched to an electrical stove, and there's something
that bugs the living daylights out of me. Namely, heat transference.

The elements are metal, and so are the pans. Neither of these is
particularly pliable, which means that there's very little actual
surface contact between the two, so there's probably a hell of a lot
of heat loss.

So my question is, is there anything to help with that, like some sort
of soft, heat-conductive pad that goes between the two to help with
heat transference {for the computer-wise, basically thermal paste,
except in solid form}.

Or anything else that works, really.

Regards,

Quinch


There's nothing like that as far as I know. At least you're getting
better heat transfer than gas. If you want the most efficient method of
cooking you'd pretty much have to go with an induction range or cook
with microwave. The cheapest to operate would still be gas any way you
look at it. People should be looking at ways to improve the efficiency
of gas but it's so cheap that there's little interest.


Gas is not always an option. There are no gas lines run to where I
live. Everything is strictly electric.

It takes a while if you're used to gas cooking to get used to electric
cooking. There is no problem with the stove or the cookware... IMNO
he's just not used to the stove.

Jill
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Old 09-08-2013, 06:46 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On 8/9/2013 7:42 AM, jmcquown wrote:
On 8/9/2013 1:13 PM, dsi1 wrote:
On 8/8/2013 6:34 AM, Quinch wrote:
I've recently switched to an electrical stove, and there's something
that bugs the living daylights out of me. Namely, heat transference.

The elements are metal, and so are the pans. Neither of these is
particularly pliable, which means that there's very little actual
surface contact between the two, so there's probably a hell of a lot
of heat loss.

So my question is, is there anything to help with that, like some sort
of soft, heat-conductive pad that goes between the two to help with
heat transference {for the computer-wise, basically thermal paste,
except in solid form}.

Or anything else that works, really.

Regards,

Quinch


There's nothing like that as far as I know. At least you're getting
better heat transfer than gas. If you want the most efficient method of
cooking you'd pretty much have to go with an induction range or cook
with microwave. The cheapest to operate would still be gas any way you
look at it. People should be looking at ways to improve the efficiency
of gas but it's so cheap that there's little interest.


Gas is not always an option. There are no gas lines run to where I
live. Everything is strictly electric.

It takes a while if you're used to gas cooking to get used to electric
cooking. There is no problem with the stove or the cookware... IMNO
he's just not used to the stove.


I think your analysis of the situation is correct. It would take me a
while to get used to gas again.


Jill


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Old 09-08-2013, 08:04 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On Fri, 09 Aug 2013 07:46:16 -1000, dsi1
wrote:

On 8/9/2013 7:42 AM, jmcquown wrote:
On 8/9/2013 1:13 PM, dsi1 wrote:
On 8/8/2013 6:34 AM, Quinch wrote:
I've recently switched to an electrical stove, and there's something
that bugs the living daylights out of me. Namely, heat transference.

The elements are metal, and so are the pans. Neither of these is
particularly pliable, which means that there's very little actual
surface contact between the two, so there's probably a hell of a lot
of heat loss.

So my question is, is there anything to help with that, like some sort
of soft, heat-conductive pad that goes between the two to help with
heat transference {for the computer-wise, basically thermal paste,
except in solid form}.

Or anything else that works, really.

Regards,

Quinch


There's nothing like that as far as I know. At least you're getting
better heat transfer than gas. If you want the most efficient method of
cooking you'd pretty much have to go with an induction range or cook
with microwave. The cheapest to operate would still be gas any way you
look at it. People should be looking at ways to improve the efficiency
of gas but it's so cheap that there's little interest.


Gas is not always an option. There are no gas lines run to where I
live. Everything is strictly electric.

It takes a while if you're used to gas cooking to get used to electric
cooking. There is no problem with the stove or the cookware... IMNO
he's just not used to the stove.


I think your analysis of the situation is correct. It would take me a
while to get used to gas again.


Yeah, 18 seconds, or less


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Old 09-08-2013, 08:06 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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"jmcquown" wrote in message
...
Gas is not always an option. There are no gas lines run to where I live.
Everything is strictly electric.

It takes a while if you're used to gas cooking to get used to electric
cooking. There is no problem with the stove or the cookware... IMNO he's
just not used to the stove.


I have had gas and electric. Both older and newer stoves. Both were fine
but if I had to choose, I think I'd choose electric. I say this only
because I did have trouble with the military issue stoves. They didn't
always want to stay lit. They were gas of course.


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Old 09-08-2013, 08:19 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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jmcquown wrote:

Not everyone has the option of gas or propane. Electric is the only way
I can cook, unless I use my grill (which is not propane).


And that's exactly why you should sell that place and move. You like
to cook and evidently do a good job of it. Find yourself a place with
a good gas stove and formica countertops that can withstand constant
use and abuse.

G.
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Old 09-08-2013, 08:27 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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jmcquown wrote:

Gas is not always an option. There are no gas lines run to where I
live. Everything is strictly electric.


Copout and denial, Jill. My first apt had gas stove with a small pipe
from stove into the wall. Outside was a large propane tank to fuel it.
Each tank lasted about 2 years. Sadly, my first tank ran out halfway
through the cooking of a Thanksgiving turkey. It cooked long enough to
fill the house with good smells, but then hours later when it should
have been done, it was half raw and cold. I had to throw it out and
actually had delivery pizza that time.

G.
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Old 09-08-2013, 09:03 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On 8/9/2013 3:27 PM, Gary wrote:
Copout and denial, Jill. My first apt had gas stove with a small pipe
from stove into the wall. Outside was a large propane tank to fuel it.
Each tank lasted about 2 years. Sadly, my first tank ran out halfway
through the cooking of a Thanksgiving turkey. It cooked long enough to
fill the house with good smells, but then hours later when it should
have been done, it was half raw and cold. I had to throw it out and
actually had delivery pizza that time.

When I had my gas stove installed, I got two tanks with an automatic
switchover. When one runs out, a red flag pops up and I have plenty of
time to schedule a refill/exchange/replacement of the empty one.

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Old 09-08-2013, 09:16 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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"Gary" wrote in message ...
jmcquown wrote:

Gas is not always an option. There are no gas lines run to where I
live. Everything is strictly electric.


Copout and denial, Jill. My first apt had gas stove with a small pipe
from stove into the wall. Outside was a large propane tank to fuel it.
Each tank lasted about 2 years. Sadly, my first tank ran out halfway
through the cooking of a Thanksgiving turkey. It cooked long enough to
fill the house with good smells, but then hours later when it should
have been done, it was half raw and cold. I had to throw it out and
actually had delivery pizza that time.


Oh Do those things not have some kind of meter on them?

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