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Old 26-01-2012, 04:55 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default "Fried food heart risk 'a myth' (as long as you use olive oil or sunflower oil)"

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/health/he...sk-a-myth.html


W. Pooh (AKA Winnie P.)



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Old 26-01-2012, 05:15 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default "Fried food heart risk 'a myth' (as long as you use olive oil or sunflower oil)"

On Wed, 25 Jan 2012 23:55:13 -0500, "Christopher M."
wrote:

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/health/he...sk-a-myth.html


Might be news to some... but not for everyone.
Oh but "as long as you use olive oil or sunflower oil". So now they're
saying fried food is okay, but saturated fats are still bad. Give them
another decade and they might catch up to reality.
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Old 26-01-2012, 08:02 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default "Fried food heart risk 'a myth' (as long as you use olive oilor sunflower oil)"

On 1/25/2012 9:55 PM, Christopher M. wrote:
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/health/he...sk-a-myth.html



So, if you don't use olive or sunflower oil, it's NOT a myth?
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Old 26-01-2012, 08:40 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default "Fried food heart risk 'a myth' (as long as you use olive oil orsunflower oil)"

On Jan 25, 11:55*pm, "Christopher M."
wrote:
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/health/he...ied-food-heart...

W. Pooh (AKA Winnie P.)


Whether sat, unsat, whatever --- fat still packs a bigger caloric
punch if one is concerned about packin' on some pounds.
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Old 26-01-2012, 09:24 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default "Fried food heart risk 'a myth' (as long as you use olive oil orsunflower oil)"

On Jan 25, 10:55*pm, "Christopher M."
wrote:
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/health/he...ied-food-heart...

W. Pooh (AKA Winnie P.)


Bryan will be on shortly, and will once again begin by bombastically
telling you everything you never wanted to know about oils, and will
then brag about how much weight he lost malnourishing himself and how
anyone who is obese of a fooll!

Go:

John Kuthe...


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Old 26-01-2012, 11:18 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default "Fried food heart risk 'a myth' (as long as you use olive oil or sunflower oil)"


On Jan 25, 11:55*pm, "Christopher M."
wrote:
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/health/he...ied-food-heart....


quote

"The authors of the Spanish study noted that the findings could only
really be extrapolated to other Mediterranean countries with similar
diets"


Janet
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Old 27-01-2012, 12:04 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default "Fried food heart risk 'a myth' (as long as you use olive oil orsunflower oil)"

On Jan 26, 2:40*pm, Kalmia wrote:
On Jan 25, 11:55*pm, "Christopher M."
wrote:

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/health/he...ied-food-heart...


W. Pooh (AKA Winnie P.)


Whether sat, unsat, whatever --- fat still packs a bigger caloric
punch if one is concerned about packin' on some pounds.



If the fat is at the correct temperature, whatever you are deep frying
in it won't absorb very much of it. Which helps a little, anyway. If
you are deep frying battered cheese and snicker bars I'm going to
guess that you probably weren't too concerned about your health in the
first place.
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Old 27-01-2012, 03:19 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default "Fried food heart risk 'a myth' (as long as you use olive oil or sunflower oil)"

Christopher Helms wrote:
On Jan 26, 2:40 pm, Kalmia wrote:
On Jan 25, 11:55 pm, "Christopher M."
wrote:

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/health/he...ied-food-heart...


W. Pooh (AKA Winnie P.)


Whether sat, unsat, whatever --- fat still packs a bigger caloric
punch if one is concerned about packin' on some pounds.



If the fat is at the correct temperature, whatever you are deep frying
in it won't absorb very much of it. Which helps a little, anyway.


Yes. I believe that's called "good frying".

Alton Brown (Good Eats) did an episode on it.


W. Pooh (AKA Winnie P.)


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Old 27-01-2012, 03:21 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default "Fried food heart risk 'a myth' (as long as you use olive oil orsunflower oil)"

"Christopher M." wrote:

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/health/he...sk-a-myth.html


Amazing that you can ;ive on chicken nuggets and
french fries alone.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-2092071
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Old 27-01-2012, 03:23 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default "Fried food heart risk 'a myth' (as long as you use olive oil orsunflower oil)"

On Jan 26, 9:21*pm, Mark Thorson wrote:
"Christopher M." wrote:

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/health/he...ied-food-heart...


Amazing that you can ;ive on chicken nuggets and
french fries alone.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-2092071


For a while!!! Protein and FAT!!

John Kuthe....


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Old 27-01-2012, 05:31 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default "Fried food heart risk 'a myth' (as long as you use olive oil orsunflower oil)"

On Jan 25, 11:15*pm, Jeus wrote:
On Wed, 25 Jan 2012 23:55:13 -0500, "Christopher M."

wrote:
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/health/he...ied-food-heart...


Might be news to some... but not for everyone.
Oh but "as long as you use olive oil or sunflower oil". So now they're
saying fried food is okay, but saturated fats are still bad. Give them
another decade and they might catch up to reality.


It amazes me how much real research there is on fats, and how clueless
most people who write shit are.
Olive oil is extremely good. Hazelnut, pecan, almond, avocado,
hickory, and canola are also great--though I happen not to like the
taste of canola. Sunflower oil is not, unless it is the newfangled
high-oleic sunflower oil. Most common primarily saturated fats are
fine, with the exception of those high in palmitic and myristic acids.
Canola is a "newfangled" oil, bred to be high in oleic acid,
essentially high oleic rapeseed.
Frying potatoes in any oil can be problematic because of acrylamide:
http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/f...lamide-in-food
Partially hydrogenated oils are awful, as they are the only fats that
contain more than tiny levels of elaidic acid. But don't just believe
the guy with the blue hair (me). This info is easy to find on the
net.

--Bryan
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Old 27-01-2012, 02:21 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default "Fried food heart risk 'a myth' (as long as you use olive oil orsunflower oil)"

On Jan 26, 11:31*pm, Bryan wrote:
On Jan 25, 11:15*pm, Jeus wrote:

On Wed, 25 Jan 2012 23:55:13 -0500, "Christopher M."


wrote:
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/health/he...ied-food-heart....


Might be news to some... but not for everyone.
Oh but "as long as you use olive oil or sunflower oil". So now they're
saying fried food is okay, but saturated fats are still bad. Give them
another decade and they might catch up to reality.


It amazes me how much real research there is on fats, and how clueless
most people who write shit are.
Olive oil is extremely good. *Hazelnut, pecan, almond, avocado,
hickory, and canola are also great--though I happen not to like the
taste of canola. *Sunflower oil is not, unless it is the newfangled
high-oleic sunflower oil. *Most common primarily saturated fats are
fine, with the exception of those high in palmitic and myristic acids.
Canola is a "newfangled" oil, bred to be high in oleic acid,
essentially high oleic rapeseed.
Frying potatoes in any oil can be problematic because of acrylamide:http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/f...lamide-in-food
Partially hydrogenated oils are awful, as they are the only fats that
contain more than tiny levels of elaidic acid. *But don't just believe
the guy with the blue hair (me). *This info is easy to find on the
net.

--Bryan


There it is!! But Bryan, you forgot to brag about how much weight
you've lost via malnourishing yourself!! ;-)

John Kuthe...
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Old 27-01-2012, 06:11 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default "Fried food heart risk 'a myth' (as long as you use olive oil or sunflower oil)"

In article
,
Christopher Helms wrote:

On Jan 26, 2:40*pm, Kalmia wrote:
On Jan 25, 11:55*pm, "Christopher M."
wrote:

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/health/he...ied-food-heart...


W. Pooh (AKA Winnie P.)


Whether sat, unsat, whatever --- fat still packs a bigger caloric
punch if one is concerned about packin' on some pounds.



If the fat is at the correct temperature, whatever you are deep frying
in it won't absorb very much of it. Which helps a little, anyway.


A little. But how much? I went to the USDA database. A raw potato has
0.1g of fat per 100g. Deep fat fried potatoes have 16.12g of fat per
100g! It appeared that the calories have pretty much doubled:

http://ndb.nal.usda.gov/ndb/foods/show/6614

--
Dan Abel
Petaluma, California USA

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Old 27-01-2012, 06:49 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default "Fried food heart risk 'a myth' (as long as you use olive oil or sunflower oil)"

In article
,
Bryan wrote:


It amazes me how much real research there is on fats, and how clueless
most people who write shit are.
Olive oil is extremely good.


Yes, I am truly amazed. It's like the guy serving life in prison. He's
extremely good. Not only did he not rape any of his multiple victims,
but he didn't eat them afterwards! How good can you get?

Many people in affluent societies (which most of us who participate in
this group live in), are fat. We eat too much. That often includes too
much fat. It has been suggested, over the last few decades, that people
restrict their fat consumption to reasonable levels, as fat is very
calorie dense. A suggestion that has often been made is to cap fat
consumption at 30% of calories. It pains me a bit to call that "low
fat", but so be it.

Once you've decided how much fat you want to consume, then you can use
Bryan's information to help determine which fats to consume. I've
found, for instance, that I like olive oil just as much as butter for
some uses.

--
Dan Abel
Petaluma, California USA

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Old 27-01-2012, 08:31 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default "Fried food heart risk 'a myth' (as long as you use olive oil or sunflower oil)"

Christopher Helms wrote:
On Jan 26, 2:40 pm, Kalmia wrote:
On Jan 25, 11:55 pm, "Christopher M."
wrote:

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/health/he...ied-food-heart...


W. Pooh (AKA Winnie P.)


Whether sat, unsat, whatever --- fat still packs a bigger caloric
punch if one is concerned about packin' on some pounds.



If the fat is at the correct temperature, whatever you are deep frying
in it won't absorb very much of it. Which helps a little, anyway. If
you are deep frying battered cheese and snicker bars I'm going to
guess that you probably weren't too concerned about your health in the
first place.


Don't remind me of the fish I had at long john silvers. Dripping.

I sometimes get fried chicken at a broasting place. The stuff is void of
any sign of being oily. Even the moisture content is low.

375 degrees is ideal, but most restaurants don't go higher than 350 to make
the oil last longer. And, I'm sure some turn on the heat and are in too
much of a rush and don't wait long enough.

Give me a fried pickle right now!

Greg


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