General Cooking (rec.food.cooking) For general food and cooking discussion. Foods of all kinds, food procurement, cooking methods and techniques, eating, etc.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 01-08-2009, 10:58 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 11,454
Default Browned and braised "country style" pork ribs

We've been going light on beef and pork for a while and I have not been
cooking much, so I wanted meeeeeeeat. My favorite has to be these ribs,
deeply browned, then braised in a splash of water with rosemary and coarse
brown pepper until they fall apart. It is fatty meat, but it is one of the
best examples of how good meat is when it is cooked with bone and fat.

It's great as is, or with a drizzle of honey barbecue sauce on a sandwich. I
refrigerate it overnight and remove the creamy white fat from the top,
remove the meat from the bones and solid fat, and freeze the gelled broth
for use in stirfries and stews. Good stuff for $2 a pound, often a buck
fifty on sale. Great with noodles and mushrooms and other vegetables, too.



  #2 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 02-08-2009, 12:08 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 467
Default Browned and braised "country style" pork ribs


"cybercat" wrote in message
...
We've been going light on beef and pork for a while and I have not been
cooking much, so I wanted meeeeeeeat. My favorite has to be these ribs,
deeply browned, then braised in a splash of water with rosemary and coarse
brown pepper until they fall apart. It is fatty meat, but it is one of the
best examples of how good meat is when it is cooked with bone and fat.

It's great as is, or with a drizzle of honey barbecue sauce on a sandwich.
I refrigerate it overnight and remove the creamy white fat from the top,
remove the meat from the bones and solid fat, and freeze the gelled broth
for use in stirfries and stews. Good stuff for $2 a pound, often a buck
fifty on sale. Great with noodles and mushrooms and other vegetables, too.


Sounds good. I did some of those "ribs" on the grill last weekend, with BBQ
sauce. They were braised a little in the oven prior to grilling them. I
cooked the whole package of several pounds and froze some of the ungrilled
pre-cooked pork to use later.

  #3 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 02-08-2009, 12:36 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 2,294
Default Browned and braised "country style" pork ribs


"cybercat" wrote in message
...
We've been going light on beef and pork for a while and I have not been
cooking much, so I wanted meeeeeeeat. My favorite has to be these ribs,
deeply browned, then braised in a splash of water with rosemary and coarse
brown pepper until they fall apart. It is fatty meat, but it is one of the
best examples of how good meat is when it is cooked with bone and fat.

It's great as is, or with a drizzle of honey barbecue sauce on a sandwich.
I refrigerate it overnight and remove the creamy white fat from the top,
remove the meat from the bones and solid fat, and freeze the gelled broth
for use in stirfries and stews. Good stuff for $2 a pound, often a buck
fifty on sale. Great with noodles and mushrooms and other vegetables, too.



These were on sale here for $1.37 a pound (I think) and we bought a few
packages. Sometimes I just dump the meat in a Corningware casserole, put in
a few smashed cloves of garlic and a whole onion cut in half... and a little
BBQ sauce. Bake at 300 for a couple of hours until tender, remove the meat
and onion, skim off the fat and thicken the sauce with a bit of cornstarch
and maybe more BBQ sauce if needed.

Good, easy meal.

George L

  #4 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 02-08-2009, 12:36 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 11,454
Default Browned and braised "country style" pork ribs


"Cheryl" wrote
Sounds good. I did some of those "ribs" on the grill last weekend, with
BBQ sauce. They were braised a little in the oven prior to grilling them.
I cooked the whole package of several pounds and froze some of the
ungrilled pre-cooked pork to use later.


Grilling is the best. They are really Boston Butt sliced, aren't they?


  #5 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 02-08-2009, 12:42 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 2,250
Default Browned and braised "country style" pork ribs

cybercat wrote:
"Cheryl" wrote
Sounds good. I did some of those "ribs" on the grill last weekend, with
BBQ sauce. They were braised a little in the oven prior to grilling them.
I cooked the whole package of several pounds and froze some of the
ungrilled pre-cooked pork to use later.


Grilling is the best. They are really Boston Butt sliced, aren't they?



Yes. At least in my area. I still love them properly prepared.

Bob


  #6 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 02-08-2009, 01:09 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 11,454
Default Browned and braised "country style" pork ribs


"George Leppla" wrote

These were on sale here for $1.37 a pound (I think) and we bought a few
packages. Sometimes I just dump the meat in a Corningware casserole, put
in a few smashed cloves of garlic and a whole onion cut in half... and a
little BBQ sauce. Bake at 300 for a couple of hours until tender, remove
the meat and onion, skim off the fat and thicken the sauce with a bit of
cornstarch and maybe more BBQ sauce if needed.


I have to have them browned first. I think it really makes the flavor.


  #7 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 02-08-2009, 01:12 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 2,294
Default Browned and braised "country style" pork ribs


"cybercat" wrote in message
...

"George Leppla" wrote

These were on sale here for $1.37 a pound (I think) and we bought a few
packages. Sometimes I just dump the meat in a Corningware casserole, put
in a few smashed cloves of garlic and a whole onion cut in half... and a
little BBQ sauce. Bake at 300 for a couple of hours until tender, remove
the meat and onion, skim off the fat and thicken the sauce with a bit of
cornstarch and maybe more BBQ sauce if needed.


I have to have them browned first. I think it really makes the flavor.



I'll give that a try next time.

George L

  #8 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 02-08-2009, 01:26 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 467
Default Browned and braised "country style" pork ribs


"cybercat" wrote in message
news

"Cheryl" wrote
Sounds good. I did some of those "ribs" on the grill last weekend, with
BBQ sauce. They were braised a little in the oven prior to grilling them.
I cooked the whole package of several pounds and froze some of the
ungrilled pre-cooked pork to use later.


Grilling is the best. They are really Boston Butt sliced, aren't they?

The package I bought clearly showed the shape of the meat before they sliced
them into "ribs". They were boneless. I'm not sure what cut of the pork
they are, but they sure are good!

  #9 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 02-08-2009, 04:41 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
aem aem is offline
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 3,523
Default Browned and braised "country style" pork ribs

On Aug 1, 4:42*pm, Bob Muncie wrote:
cybercat wrote:
"Cheryl" wrote
Sounds good. I did some of those "ribs" on the grill last weekend, with
BBQ sauce. They were braised a little in the oven prior to grilling them.
I cooked the whole package of several pounds and froze some of the
ungrilled pre-cooked pork to use later.


Grilling is the best. They are really Boston Butt sliced, aren't they?


Yes. At least in my area. I still love them properly prepared.

Depends on your market. Here the packages are sometimes marked
"loin," sometimes marked "shoulder" and the "shoulder" can be boneless
or with bones. In any case they are indeed very well suited for
browning and braising. They'll stand up to the widest variety of
simmering sauces, from simple cacciatore-type to spicy Indian to
Mexican moles. -aem
  #10 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 02-08-2009, 05:06 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 5,116
Default Browned and braised "country style" pork ribs

On Aug 1, 6:36*pm, "George Leppla" wrote:

*Sometimes I just dump the meat in a
Corningware casserole


Corningware or Corning Ware? There's a difference. I love my Corning
Ware. I just bought a new (used) china cabinet to house it.

George L


--Bryan


  #11 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 02-08-2009, 06:25 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 11,454
Default Browned and braised "country style" pork ribs


"aem" wrote:

Depends on your market. Here the packages are sometimes marked
"loin,"


But loin is always lean, isn't it?


  #12 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 02-08-2009, 06:43 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 12,124
Default Browned and braised "country style" pork ribs

In article ,
"cybercat" wrote:

water with rosemary and coarse brown pepper until they fall apart.


Say more about that. I've never heard of it.

--
-Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
http://web.me.com/barbschaller - Yes, I Can! blog - check it out
"Be kind, for everyone you meet is fighting a great battle."
-Philo of Alexandria
  #13 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 02-08-2009, 07:07 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 11,454
Default Browned and braised "country style" pork ribs


"Melba's Jammin'" wrote in message
...
In article ,
"cybercat" wrote:

water with rosemary and coarse brown pepper until they fall apart.


Say more about that. I've never heard of it.


It's not anything special, I just don't add much water (my experience is
that a lot of moisture cooks out of the meat, and adding less water then
cooking on a very low heat somehow results in more succulent meat) and crush
dried rosemary, a good tablespoon of it, after I put the water in. Also
coarsely ground pepper, something I bought at the Fresh Market the other
week. It's very flavorful.


  #14 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 02-08-2009, 07:18 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
aem aem is offline
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 3,523
Default Browned and braised "country style" pork ribs

On Aug 2, 10:25*am, "cybercat" wrote:
"aem" wrote:

Depends on your market. *Here the packages are sometimes marked
"loin,"


But loin is always lean, isn't it?


Leaner than shoulder or butt. So if the package says "country style
ribs" but also says "loin" I give it a pass. I like the more
flavorful, fattier cut. -aem
  #15 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 02-08-2009, 08:18 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 2,294
Default Browned and braised "country style" pork ribs


"Bryan" wrote in message
...
On Aug 1, 6:36 pm, "George Leppla" wrote:

Sometimes I just dump the meat in a
Corningware casserole


Corningware or Corning Ware? There's a difference. I love my Corning

Ware. I just bought a new (used) china cabinet to house it.


Really? I didn't know that.

I see it as CorningWare on their website
http://www.corningware.com/default.asp and
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CorningWare

I don't know of any other brand called "Corning Ware" but I'm open to learn
new things.

George L







Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Pork "country style ribs" zxcvbob General Cooking 44 07-10-2012 08:19 AM
"Faux" BBQ Pork Ribs with Memphis style dry rub (pressure cooker & broiler) Paul Michaels Barbecue 6 17-11-2010 10:28 PM
"Faux" BBQ Pork Ribs with Memphis style dry rub (pressure cooker & broiler) Paul Michaels General Cooking 0 17-11-2010 09:40 PM
"Country style" ribs on the grill Cheryl[_3_] General Cooking 28 06-06-2010 11:27 PM
Stoopid question: cutting "country ribs" from a pork shoulder roast Zz Yzx Barbecue 7 05-10-2008 06:52 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 03:56 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2022, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ©2004-2022 FoodBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about Food and drink"

 

Copyright © 2017