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General Cooking (rec.food.cooking) For general food and cooking discussion. Foods of all kinds, food procurement, cooking methods and techniques, eating, etc.

Difference between marinara & pasta sauce?



 
 
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  #1 (permalink)  
Old 20-03-2009, 08:29 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 119
Default Difference between marinara & pasta sauce?

FERRANTE, if I was in the mood, I'd turn the lights down low and reply
with soft music, but you'll have to accept this instead::
What is the difference between a marinara sauce and a basic pasta
sauce?

Anyone have a good recipe for a simple marinara sauce, please?

Mark


Maranira is a tomato based sauce that can be put on pasta or can be
used in a number of different ways. It's just blanched, peeled, diced
tomatoes, sauteed onions in olive oil, salt, pepper (red or black or
both), and your basic Italian herbs (thyme, oregano, and basil).
Simmer it and maybe thicken it with some tomato paste. Parmesan cheese
is an excellent accompaniment. There is no meat in marinera sauce.

"Pasta sauce" is a generic term. It can be anything from butter or
olive oil to pesto or marinara or meat sauce.

--
Yours,
Dan S.
the unruly redshirt


Ads
  #2 (permalink)  
Old 20-03-2009, 08:45 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,191
Default Difference between marinara & pasta sauce?

On Fri, 20 Mar 2009 15:58:19 -0500, FERRANTE
wrote:

What is the difference between a marinara sauce and a basic pasta
sauce?

Anyone have a good recipe for a simple marinara sauce, please?


Dunno the difference, but I do know that Harry's Tomato Sauce is one
of the very best things you can put on spaghetti.


* Exported from MasterCook *

Harry's Tomato Sauce

Recipe By :Harry Demidavicius
Serving Size : 10 Preparation Time :2:15
Categories : Sauces/Gravies

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method
-------- ------------ --------------------------------
1 large carrot -- cut in large chunks
1 stalk celery -- cut in large chunks
1 medium onion -- cut in large chunks
1 clove garlic
1/4 cup olive oil
1 tablespoon dried oregano
1/4 teaspoon ground fennel -- (Carol's addition)
28 ounces Italian tomatoes -- crushed
1 cup dry red wine
1/4 cup fresh parsley -- minced

1. Blend the carrot, celery, onion, garlic, oil, and oregano in a food
processor until emulsified.

2. Empty the tomatoes into a large saucepan on medium heat and mash
them. Stir in the vegetable mixture. The resulting blend should be
quite thick & look reddish with traces of green & yellow visible. When
it starts to bubble turn down the heat & simmer uncovered for about
90 minutes, stirring occasionally, until it has reduced & blended into
a sauce.

3. Add in the wine and continue to simmer for a few more minutes. Stir
in the parsley simmer for 5 more minutes. Taste and adjust seasonings
and remove from heat.

4. The sauce may now be served over pasta or stored in the
refrigerator in tightly capped 28 ounce jars.

Cuisine:
"Italian"

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 90 Calories; 6g Fat (64.7%
calories from fat); 1g Protein; 6g Carbohydrate; 2g Dietary Fiber; 0mg
Cholesterol; 29mg Sodium. Exchanges: 0 Grain(Starch); 1 Vegetable; 1
Fat.

--
Change "invalid" to JamesBond's agent number to reply.
  #3 (permalink)  
Old 20-03-2009, 08:58 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 178
Default Difference between marinara & pasta sauce?

What is the difference between a marinara sauce and a basic pasta
sauce?

Anyone have a good recipe for a simple marinara sauce, please?

Mark
  #4 (permalink)  
Old 20-03-2009, 09:11 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,215
Default Difference between marinara & pasta sauce?

FERRANTE wrote:
What is the difference between a marinara sauce and a basic pasta
sauce?

Anyone have a good recipe for a simple marinara sauce, please?

Mark


there is no definition for what you're calling "basic pasta sauce"
What is basic to you, might not be to someone else. It might not even
contain tomato, but a marinara sauce does.
  #5 (permalink)  
Old 20-03-2009, 10:13 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,502
Default Difference between marinara & pasta sauce?

Damsel in dis Dress wrote:

Dunno the difference, but I do know that Harry's Tomato Sauce is one
of the very best things you can put on spaghetti.


* Exported from MasterCook *

Harry's Tomato Sauce

Recipe By :Harry Demidavicius
Serving Size : 10 Preparation Time :2:15
Categories : Sauces/Gravies

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method
-------- ------------ --------------------------------
1 large carrot -- cut in large chunks
1 stalk celery -- cut in large chunks
1 medium onion -- cut in large chunks
1 clove garlic
1/4 cup olive oil
1 tablespoon dried oregano
1/4 teaspoon ground fennel -- (Carol's addition)
28 ounces Italian tomatoes -- crushed
1 cup dry red wine
1/4 cup fresh parsley -- minced

1. Blend the carrot, celery, onion, garlic, oil, and oregano in a food
processor until emulsified.

2. Empty the tomatoes into a large saucepan on medium heat and mash
them. Stir in the vegetable mixture. The resulting blend should be
quite thick & look reddish with traces of green & yellow visible. When
it starts to bubble turn down the heat & simmer uncovered for about
90 minutes, stirring occasionally, until it has reduced & blended into
a sauce.

3. Add in the wine and continue to simmer for a few more minutes. Stir
in the parsley simmer for 5 more minutes. Taste and adjust seasonings
and remove from heat.

4. The sauce may now be served over pasta or stored in the
refrigerator in tightly capped 28 ounce jars.


Thanks for that one, Carol.

How are you and Crash doing?

--
Janet Wilder
way-the-heck-south Texas
spelling doesn't count
but cooking does
  #6 (permalink)  
Old 20-03-2009, 10:41 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9,919
Default Difference between marinara & pasta sauce?


"FERRANTE" wrote in message
...
What is the difference between a marinara sauce and a basic pasta
sauce?


Marinara sauce contains no meat... if used on a dish containing meat then it
is no longer marinara sauce.


  #7 (permalink)  
Old 21-03-2009, 01:09 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9,919
Default Difference between marinara & pasta sauce?


"Goomba" wrote in message
...
FERRANTE wrote:
What is the difference between a marinara sauce and a basic pasta
sauce?

Anyone have a good recipe for a simple marinara sauce, please?

Mark


there is no definition for what you're calling "basic pasta sauce"
What is basic to you, might not be to someone else. It might not even
contain tomato, but a marinara sauce does.


Are you positive you're Italian?

http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-marinara-sauce.htm
"Marinara sauce originated with sailors in Naples in the 16th century, after
the Spaniards introduced the tomato to their neighboring countries. The word
marinara is derived from marinaro, which is Italian for "of the sea."
Because of this, many people mistakenly believe marinara sauce includes some
type of fish or seafood. However, marinara sauce loosely translates as "the
sauce of the sailors," because it was a meatless sauce extensively used on
sailing ships before modern refrigeration techniques were invented. The lack
of meat and the sheer simplicity of making tasty marinara sauce were
particularly appealing to the cooks on board sailing ships, because the high
acid content of the tomatoes and the absence of any type of meat fat
resulted in a sauce which would not easily spoil."


  #8 (permalink)  
Old 21-03-2009, 01:28 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 516
Default Difference between marinara & pasta sauce?


"Damsel in dis Dress" wrote in message
...
On Fri, 20 Mar 2009 15:58:19 -0500, FERRANTE
wrote:

What is the difference between a marinara sauce and a basic pasta
sauce?

Anyone have a good recipe for a simple marinara sauce, please?


Dunno the difference, but I do know that Harry's Tomato Sauce is one
of the very best things you can put on spaghetti.


* Exported from MasterCook *

Harry's Tomato Sauce

Recipe By :Harry Demidavicius
Serving Size : 10 Preparation Time :2:15
Categories : Sauces/Gravies

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method
-------- ------------ --------------------------------
1 large carrot -- cut in large chunks
1 stalk celery -- cut in large chunks
1 medium onion -- cut in large chunks
1 clove garlic
1/4 cup olive oil
1 tablespoon dried oregano
1/4 teaspoon ground fennel -- (Carol's addition)
28 ounces Italian tomatoes -- crushed
1 cup dry red wine
1/4 cup fresh parsley -- minced

1. Blend the carrot, celery, onion, garlic, oil, and oregano in a food
processor until emulsified.

2. Empty the tomatoes into a large saucepan on medium heat and mash
them. Stir in the vegetable mixture. The resulting blend should be
quite thick & look reddish with traces of green & yellow visible. When
it starts to bubble turn down the heat & simmer uncovered for about
90 minutes, stirring occasionally, until it has reduced & blended into
a sauce.

3. Add in the wine and continue to simmer for a few more minutes. Stir
in the parsley simmer for 5 more minutes. Taste and adjust seasonings
and remove from heat.

4. The sauce may now be served over pasta or stored in the
refrigerator in tightly capped 28 ounce jars.

I mince the onions, celery, carrot and garlic and sauté that a bit until the
celery and onion are soft. That softens the onion taste, and the garlic is a
bit less harsh. Then I add any seasoning and proceed pretty much as above.
Also, if you want a sauce that's a bit more delicate, try white wine instead
of red wine. An inexpensive vermouth works great. That hint came from the
goddess of Italian cooking, Marcella Hazan.

Ed



  #9 (permalink)  
Old 21-03-2009, 01:35 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,191
Default Difference between marinara & pasta sauce?

On Fri, 20 Mar 2009 20:58:07 -0500, FERRANTE
wrote:

I prefer jarred pasta sauces even though I know homemade would be
better. I usually stuck with Barilla or Classico as I hate Ragu' and
Prego. Now I see that supermarkets are carrying pasta sauces in foil
pouches in the freezer section. Just heat up and pour over your
favorite pasta. I may try that soon.


I feel the same about Ragu and Prego. Barilla is my convenience
spaghetti sauce of choice. Finances usually dictate using Hunt's
canned sauces. Cheap, and definitely better than those other two.

I think I will try the Harry's Tomato Sauce recipe that was included
in this thread.


You won't be sorry you did. It is wonderful stuff!

Carol

--
Change "invalid" to JamesBond's agent number to reply.
  #10 (permalink)  
Old 21-03-2009, 01:41 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 44,198
Default Difference between marinara & pasta sauce?

On Fri, 20 Mar 2009 15:45:04 -0500, Damsel in dis Dress
wrote:

1/4 teaspoon ground fennel -- (Carol's addition)


I thought you didn't like Italian sausage because of the fennel seeds.
Am I not remembering correctly?


--
I never worry about diets. The only carrots that
interest me are the number of carats in a diamond.

Mae West
  #11 (permalink)  
Old 21-03-2009, 01:58 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 178
Default Difference between marinara & pasta sauce?

On Fri, 20 Mar 2009 22:41:23 GMT, "brooklyn1"
wrote:


"FERRANTE" wrote in message
.. .
What is the difference between a marinara sauce and a basic pasta
sauce?


Marinara sauce contains no meat... if used on a dish containing meat then it
is no longer marinara sauce.


While I love to add all kinds of things to jarred pasta sauce, every
once in a while I just want pasta and a basic tomato sauce and someone
suggested using marinara instead.

I prefer jarred pasta sauces even though I know homemade would be
better. I usually stuck with Barilla or Classico as I hate Ragu' and
Prego. Now I see that supermarkets are carrying pasta sauces in foil
pouches in the freezer section. Just heat up and pour over your
favorite pasta. I may try that soon.

I think I will try the Harry's Tomato Sauce recipe that was included
in this thread.

Mark
  #12 (permalink)  
Old 21-03-2009, 01:58 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 178
Default Difference between marinara & pasta sauce?

On Fri, 20 Mar 2009 15:45:04 -0500, Damsel in dis Dress
wrote:

On Fri, 20 Mar 2009 15:58:19 -0500, FERRANTE
wrote:

What is the difference between a marinara sauce and a basic pasta
sauce?

Anyone have a good recipe for a simple marinara sauce, please?


Dunno the difference, but I do know that Harry's Tomato Sauce is one
of the very best things you can put on spaghetti.


Thanks!

Mark
  #13 (permalink)  
Old 21-03-2009, 02:08 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,191
Default Difference between marinara & pasta sauce?

On Fri, 20 Mar 2009 18:41:29 -0700, sf wrote:

On Fri, 20 Mar 2009 15:45:04 -0500, Damsel in dis Dress
wrote:

1/4 teaspoon ground fennel -- (Carol's addition)


I thought you didn't like Italian sausage because of the fennel seeds.
Am I not remembering correctly?


I adore fennel seeds. I always have both whole and ground fennel
seeds on hand. Must be someone else.

Carol

--
Change "invalid" to JamesBond's agent number to reply.
  #14 (permalink)  
Old 21-03-2009, 04:15 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 7,547
Default Difference between marinara & pasta sauce?

In article ,
Damsel in dis Dress wrote:

On Fri, 20 Mar 2009 18:41:29 -0700, sf wrote:

On Fri, 20 Mar 2009 15:45:04 -0500, Damsel in dis Dress
wrote:

1/4 teaspoon ground fennel -- (Carol's addition)


I thought you didn't like Italian sausage because of the fennel seeds.
Am I not remembering correctly?


I adore fennel seeds. I always have both whole and ground fennel
seeds on hand. Must be someone else.


I thought we used to have somebody on rfc who didn't like fennel, but we
all got together and drummed them out of here.

:-)

Just kidding, of course. My father used to keep a pepper grinder on the
table in the kitchen, loaded with fennel seeds. He'd add a couple of
grinds to all sorts of food.

--
Dan Abel
Petaluma, California USA

  #15 (permalink)  
Old 21-03-2009, 05:39 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 44,198
Default Difference between marinara & pasta sauce?

On Fri, 20 Mar 2009 20:35:15 -0500, Damsel in dis Dress
wrote:

On Fri, 20 Mar 2009 20:58:07 -0500, FERRANTE
wrote:

I prefer jarred pasta sauces even though I know homemade would be
better. I usually stuck with Barilla or Classico as I hate Ragu' and
Prego. Now I see that supermarkets are carrying pasta sauces in foil
pouches in the freezer section. Just heat up and pour over your
favorite pasta. I may try that soon.


I feel the same about Ragu and Prego. Barilla is my convenience
spaghetti sauce of choice. Finances usually dictate using Hunt's
canned sauces. Cheap, and definitely better than those other two.

Have you ever tried Classico? I haven't tried the pasta sauce, but I
use their tomato "pesto" as pizza sauce and it's very good.


--
I never worry about diets. The only carrots that
interest me are the number of carats in a diamond.

Mae West
 




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