Tea (rec.drink.tea) Discussion relating to tea, the world's second most consumed beverage (after water), made by infusing or boiling the leaves of the tea plant (C. sinensis or close relatives) in water.

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Old 10-06-2006, 11:28 PM posted to rec.food.drink.tea
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Default Keemun

Upton's has a Keemun Mao Feng that I just adore (I think it's ZK98T). I
don't know a great deal about Keemuns, but would like to explore some
more.

Can anyone please recommend a "next step" Keemun and it's vendor? Not
too expensive, mind you, but a step above ordinary. Please share your
favorite Keemun experiences.

Much appreciated,
Jennifer


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Old 14-06-2006, 10:24 AM posted to rec.food.drink.tea
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Default Keemun

Maofeng is definitely giving me a lot of pleasure at the moment, too.
I have a good batch from a recent trip to Chengdu which smells
delicious (as in wonderfully fruity) while being smooth in flavour with
an aromatic aftertaste that you're going to love. If you'll bear with
me, I'll see if I can dig up the details of it for you.

Maofeng is a lovely tea for this kind of year (assuming that it's hot
where you are at the moment!). Great choice.


Toodlepip,

Hobbes

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Old 16-06-2006, 01:56 AM posted to rec.food.drink.tea
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Default Keemun

KMF is usually considered either the top of the line Keemun, or one of two
top of the line Keemuns, the other being Keemun Hao Ya (sometimes available
in 'A' and 'B' variations). I love both. To me, the KHY is a "stronger" or
"punchier" taste, the KMF a considerably milder one, but that can depend on
how you brew the KHY. KMF and KHY are quite different in character, and good
examples of both are very worthwhile. They are also usually the most
expensive Keemuns.

Upton and Harney and TeaSource usually have both KHY 'A' and 'B' (Upton also
has a selection of other Keemuns). Special Teas has a KHY 'A'. Rishi and
Imperial Tea Court have a KHY, as does Plymouth Tea (though I believe they
are waiting for a shipment of a new batch). Seven Cups has an extensive
selection of good Keemuns, though they don't call them by any Chinese name.

In my experience, Keemun Mao Feng and Keemun Hao Ya are so much better than
any other type of Keemun that I hardly ever try any other kind, and am
almost always disappointed when I do.

Doug

"jenandcleo" wrote in message
oups.com...
Upton's has a Keemun Mao Feng that I just adore (I think it's ZK98T). I
don't know a great deal about Keemuns, but would like to explore some
more.

Can anyone please recommend a "next step" Keemun and it's vendor? Not
too expensive, mind you, but a step above ordinary. Please share your
favorite Keemun experiences.

Much appreciated,
Jennifer



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Old 17-06-2006, 05:35 AM posted to rec.food.drink.tea
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Default Keemun

I was acutally rather dissapointed with the most recent crop of keemun mao
feng and hao ya A (and B for that matter). I found it very smokey, like how
I smell after I come home from camping or re-enacting.
I'm glad you liked it though Jen! I can hardly wait for next years crop and
your opinion on it!
Marlene

"jenandcleo" wrote in message
oups.com...
Upton's has a Keemun Mao Feng that I just adore (I think it's ZK98T). I
don't know a great deal about Keemuns, but would like to explore some
more.

Can anyone please recommend a "next step" Keemun and it's vendor? Not
too expensive, mind you, but a step above ordinary. Please share your
favorite Keemun experiences.

Much appreciated,
Jennifer



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Old 21-06-2006, 11:21 AM posted to rec.food.drink.tea
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Default Keemun

Although not my favorite vendor by far, SpecialTeas in years past
had some most excellent Keemun. Silk Road Teas has some quite
inexpensive Keemun in their stocks, but it does present a bit of
smoke, which might not be to your liking. They also have a rich
wonderous, albeit light, Keemun they call "Red Peach." (I speak
of the David Hoffman/Ned Hegarty SRT in California.)

Best news is that you can keep Keemun for a good long time, and
it will only get better. So, when you find that special offering, you
can stock up, and not worry about the tea going stale, provided you
store it well.

Michael

I was acutally rather dissapointed with the most recent crop of keemun mao
feng and hao ya A (and B for that matter). I found it very smokey, like how
I smell after I come home from camping or re-enacting.
I'm glad you liked it though Jen! I can hardly wait for next years crop and
your opinion on it!
Marlene

"jenandcleo" wrote in message
oups.com...
Upton's has a Keemun Mao Feng that I just adore (I think it's ZK98T). I
don't know a great deal about Keemuns, but would like to explore some
more.

Can anyone please recommend a "next step" Keemun and it's vendor? Not
too expensive, mind you, but a step above ordinary. Please share your
favorite Keemun experiences.

Much appreciated,
Jennifer




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Old 23-06-2006, 12:35 AM posted to rec.food.drink.tea
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Default Keemun

Wow - I had no idea Keemun would improve with age. Are there other
teas, beside Puer, that improve with age? Everything I've read says to
consume tea within a couple of years.

Jennifer

Michael Plant wrote:
Best news is that you can keep Keemun for a good long time, and
it will only get better. So, when you find that special offering, you
can stock up, and not worry about the tea going stale, provided you
store it well.

Michael


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Old 23-06-2006, 01:49 AM posted to rec.food.drink.tea
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Default Keemun

I've heard three months for most teas. The cheapest generic Aldi's
teabags improve with a year in the back of the stash. More mellow.
Toci
jenandcleo wrote:
Wow - I had no idea Keemun would improve with age. Are there other
teas, beside Puer, that improve with age? Everything I've read says to
consume tea within a couple of years.

Jennifer

Michael Plant wrote:
Best news is that you can keep Keemun for a good long time, and
it will only get better. So, when you find that special offering, you
can stock up, and not worry about the tea going stale, provided you
store it well.

Michael


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Old 23-06-2006, 10:32 AM posted to rec.food.drink.tea
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Default Keemun


Hi Jennifer,

It's important to say here that Keemun, unlike
Pu'erh, can't be stashed away for years and
years -- to my knowledge, that is; rather, a
year or two of age seems to bring out its soft
chocolate qualities. WuYi teas are also candidates
for holding months before drinking, but
only those that have been roasted well. I'm
hearing that Dan Congs (Phoenix Mts) also
take well to some age, but again, not at the
Pu'erh level where 30 years is really good and
50 years is excellent. And yesterday I saw pictures
of several cakes over 150 years old.

Michael, rambling


Wow - I had no idea Keemun would improve with age. Are there other
teas, beside Puer, that improve with age? Everything I've read says to
consume tea within a couple of years.

Jennifer

Michael Plant wrote:
Best news is that you can keep Keemun for a good long time, and
it will only get better. So, when you find that special offering, you
can stock up, and not worry about the tea going stale, provided you
store it well.

Michael



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Old 23-06-2006, 01:49 PM posted to rec.food.drink.tea
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Default Keemun

I have many teas that are 20-30 years old. I can't possibly finish
everything I buy. Everytime I try one it has taste and aroma. I never
threw anything away because I thought it was stale. Do they taste
better now than then, I don't know. I do have one 30 year old SowMee
that doesn't look or taste like something recent. I attribute that to
age. One thing that Puer has tought me, it is the crop that
contributes to the taste from recent years. I suspect that is also the
case for older puer. I do see benefits from airing out puer but the
yeasties needs oxygen like the rest of us.

Jim

Michael Plant wrote:
Hi Jennifer,

It's important to say here that Keemun, unlike
Pu'erh, can't be stashed away for years and
years -- to my knowledge, that is; rather, a
year or two of age seems to bring out its soft
chocolate qualities. WuYi teas are also candidates
for holding months before drinking, but
only those that have been roasted well. I'm
hearing that Dan Congs (Phoenix Mts) also
take well to some age, but again, not at the
Pu'erh level where 30 years is really good and
50 years is excellent. And yesterday I saw pictures
of several cakes over 150 years old.

Michael, rambling


Wow - I had no idea Keemun would improve with age. Are there other
teas, beside Puer, that improve with age? Everything I've read says to
consume tea within a couple of years.

Jennifer

Michael Plant wrote:
Best news is that you can keep Keemun for a good long time, and
it will only get better. So, when you find that special offering, you
can stock up, and not worry about the tea going stale, provided you
store it well.

Michael




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Old 23-06-2006, 02:57 PM posted to rec.food.drink.tea
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Default Keemun



I have many teas that are 20-30 years old. I can't possibly finish
everything I buy. Everytime I try one it has taste and aroma. I never
threw anything away because I thought it was stale. Do they taste
better now than then, I don't know. I do have one 30 year old SowMee
that doesn't look or taste like something recent. I attribute that to
age. One thing that Puer has tought me, it is the crop that
contributes to the taste from recent years. I suspect that is also the
case for older puer. I do see benefits from airing out puer but the
yeasties needs oxygen like the rest of us.
Jim


Hold those teas, Jim. As the ancient tea trend hits
each one, sell it for a fortune. Get the last laugh.
It's bound to happen.
Michael

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Old 23-06-2006, 04:12 PM posted to rec.food.drink.tea
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Default Keemun

I wished I would have kept those sales slips. Only in the last five
years have I started to do so. My favorite version of Who Knows Where
The Time Goes is Sandy Denny and Fairport Convention. She makes Joni
Mitchell sound like a whiner.

Jim

PS Am I the only one who doesn't throw any tea away? I'm lucky low
humdity, cool dry walkout basement, indirect sunlight.

Michael Plant wrote:
I have many teas that are 20-30 years old. I can't possibly finish
everything I buy. Everytime I try one it has taste and aroma. I never
threw anything away because I thought it was stale. Do they taste
better now than then, I don't know. I do have one 30 year old SowMee
that doesn't look or taste like something recent. I attribute that to
age. One thing that Puer has tought me, it is the crop that
contributes to the taste from recent years. I suspect that is also the
case for older puer. I do see benefits from airing out puer but the
yeasties needs oxygen like the rest of us.
Jim


Hold those teas, Jim. As the ancient tea trend hits
each one, sell it for a fortune. Get the last laugh.
It's bound to happen.
Michael


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Old 24-06-2006, 03:52 PM posted to rec.food.drink.tea
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Default Keemun

[Michael] And yesterday I saw pictures of several cakes over 150 years
old.

[Jing] Cakes? I thought that the cakes were started to be produced
during the very late of the Qing Dynasty to "Min Guo (started from
1912)", before that, puerh tea was a tribute tea that was consumed by
the royal familly only. And, the shape was the "Jin Gua (gold melon)"
like shape that were made by puerh tea buds. Those only two pieces of
Qing Dynasty tribute "Jin Gua" that are still avaiable in the museume
now are barely 120 year old...I wonder what are the cakes on the
pictures that you saw? Thanks!

About the Keemun, yes! You can keep it for a couple of years without
any problem. The liquor will become very smooth and its signature
fruity (mature apple flavor for me) flavor is still yielding...However,
if you want to store a red tea for aging, the Wuyi Zheng Shan Xiao
Zhong (lapsang souchong) would be a better choice. Just try one from
1994 today, it was still very tasty...even it is a "lower grading
(bigger leaves)" one. Slightly smoky hint with its typical dry fruit
flavor, yummie!

Jing


Michael Plant wrote:
Hi Jennifer,

It's important to say here that Keemun, unlike
Pu'erh, can't be stashed away for years and
years -- to my knowledge, that is; rather, a
year or two of age seems to bring out its soft
chocolate qualities. WuYi teas are also candidates
for holding months before drinking, but
only those that have been roasted well. I'm
hearing that Dan Congs (Phoenix Mts) also
take well to some age, but again, not at the
Pu'erh level where 30 years is really good and
50 years is excellent. And yesterday I saw pictures
of several cakes over 150 years old.

Michael, rambling


Wow - I had no idea Keemun would improve with age. Are there other
teas, beside Puer, that improve with age? Everything I've read says to
consume tea within a couple of years.

Jennifer

Michael Plant wrote:
Best news is that you can keep Keemun for a good long time, and
it will only get better. So, when you find that special offering, you
can stock up, and not worry about the tea going stale, provided you
store it well.

Michael



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Old 25-06-2006, 03:05 AM posted to rec.food.drink.tea
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Default The late and much lamented AEMD (was: Keemun)

Space Cowboy wrote:
My favorite version of Who Knows Where
The Time Goes is Sandy Denny and Fairport Convention.


Well, after all, she wrote it. Quite early in her tragically short
career, even.

I'd speculate on her preference in tea, but it doesn't get much mention
in the recent biography, and one suspects that New England Tea was more
to her taste.

-DM
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Old 26-06-2006, 10:22 AM posted to rec.food.drink.tea
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Default Keemun

6/24/06


[Michael] And yesterday I saw pictures of several cakes over 150 years
old.

[Jing] Cakes? I thought that the cakes were started to be produced
during the very late of the Qing Dynasty to "Min Guo (started from
1912)", before that, puerh tea was a tribute tea that was consumed by
the royal familly only. And, the shape was the "Jin Gua (gold melon)"
like shape that were made by puerh tea buds. Those only two pieces of
Qing Dynasty tribute "Jin Gua" that are still avaiable in the museume
now are barely 120 year old...I wonder what are the cakes on the
pictures that you saw? Thanks!


I think it *was* tribute tea and in the melon form at that. I used
the word "cake" too loosely. Sorry. I'll get more specific information
Tuesday and pass it on to you.

About the Keemun, yes! You can keep it for a couple of years without
any problem. The liquor will become very smooth and its signature
fruity (mature apple flavor for me) flavor is still yielding...However,
if you want to store a red tea for aging, the Wuyi Zheng Shan Xiao
Zhong (lapsang souchong) would be a better choice. Just try one from
1994 today, it was still very tasty...even it is a "lower grading
(bigger leaves)" one. Slightly smoky hint with its typical dry fruit
flavor, yummie!


Jing, are we talking about WuYi improvement or just
minimal degradation? I really like several 20 or so
year old WuYi teas I've drunk lately, a Ti Lohan
especially. Very nice, and quite different from its
newly made counterpart.

Michael




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