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Old 07-07-2005, 03:32 AM
Robert Sparkman
 
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Default Gritted Cornbread recipe?

Hello All,

Does anyone have a recipe for gritted cornbread?

thanks.

Robert



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Old 07-07-2005, 04:20 AM
jmcquown
 
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Robert Sparkman wrote:
Hello All,

Does anyone have a recipe for gritted cornbread?

thanks.

Robert


Could you describe it better than that? No idea what "gritted" cornbread
is.

Jill


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Old 07-07-2005, 04:26 AM
Damsel
 
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"jmcquown" said:

Robert Sparkman wrote:

Does anyone have a recipe for gritted cornbread?


Could you describe it better than that? No idea what "gritted" cornbread
is.


All I could think of is cornbread made with part cornmeal and part grits?

Carol

--
Coming at you live, from beautiful Lake Woebegon
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Old 07-07-2005, 04:45 AM
Wayne Boatwright
 
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On Wed 06 Jul 2005 07:32:43p, Robert Sparkman wrote in rec.food.cooking:

Hello All,

Does anyone have a recipe for gritted cornbread?

thanks.

Robert


You really need stone ground cornmeal for the texture you want.

2 cups stone ground cornmeal, either yellow or white
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon baking soda
2 eggs, well beaten
1-3/4 cup buttermilk
1/4 cup bacon drippings or melted Crisco

Preheat oven to 425F. Place bacon drippings in 9-inch cast iron skillet
or heavy baking pan. Place in oven as it preheats. Drippings should be
almost smoking hot when ready. Do not allow to cool.

Combine cornmeal, salt, and baking soda in large mixing bowl.

With a whisk or fork, beat eggs and buttermilk into dry mixture. (Start
with 1-1/2 cups of the buttermilk. Batter should be thick, but pourable.
Add additional butter as necessary.)

Carefully pour hot drippings into batter while continuing to beat.

Pour batter into skillet. It should sizzle as it hits the pan.

Bake in upper third of oven for 30-35 minutes, or until firm to touch and
well browned.

Turn bread out upside down on large plate. Slide back into pan top side
down, return to oven, and bake an additional 5 minutes.

Turn bread out right side up on plate, cut into wedges, and serve very hot.

--
Wayne Boatwright **
____________________________________________

Give me a smart idiot over a stupid genius any day.
Sam Goldwyn, 1882-1974


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Old 07-07-2005, 04:46 AM
Wayne Boatwright
 
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On Wed 06 Jul 2005 08:20:34p, jmcquown wrote in rec.food.cooking:

Robert Sparkman wrote:
Hello All,

Does anyone have a recipe for gritted cornbread?

thanks.

Robert


Could you describe it better than that? No idea what "gritted" cornbread
is.

Jill


I think he means the way I make it, Jill. No flour.

--
Wayne Boatwright **
____________________________________________

Give me a smart idiot over a stupid genius any day.
Sam Goldwyn, 1882-1974


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Old 07-07-2005, 04:48 AM
JeanineAlyse
 
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Robert Sparkman wrote:
Hello All,

Does anyone have a recipe for gritted cornbread?

thanks.

Robert

Basically, gritted cornbread can be made with any cornbread recipe or
mix, it's the addition of days-old, somewhat dried out corn off the cob
that is added to the mix to give it the "gritted" attribute. Grate the
corn off the cob using a common grater's largest holes. Try using a
six to six: six or so six days off the plant cobs for grating into a
boxed batter (like Marie Calendar's) before setting the batter to bake.

....Picky ~JA~

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Old 07-07-2005, 04:54 AM
jmcquown
 
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Damsel wrote:
"jmcquown" said:

Robert Sparkman wrote:

Does anyone have a recipe for gritted cornbread?


Could you describe it better than that? No idea what "gritted"
cornbread is.


All I could think of is cornbread made with part cornmeal and part
grits?

Carol


That sounds awful! Unless the grits were already cooked, then it might be
okay... (doubtful)

Jill


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Old 07-07-2005, 04:56 AM
Wayne Boatwright
 
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On Wed 06 Jul 2005 08:48:11p, JeanineAlyse wrote in rec.food.cooking:



Robert Sparkman wrote:
Hello All,

Does anyone have a recipe for gritted cornbread?

thanks.

Robert

Basically, gritted cornbread can be made with any cornbread recipe or
mix, it's the addition of days-old, somewhat dried out corn off the cob
that is added to the mix to give it the "gritted" attribute. Grate the
corn off the cob using a common grater's largest holes. Try using a
six to six: six or so six days off the plant cobs for grating into a
boxed batter (like Marie Calendar's) before setting the batter to bake.

...Picky ~JA~


Guess that's another way, and it sounds good. However, we always called it
gritted cornbread when it contained stone ground cornmeal and no flour.
The stone ground meal provides the grittiness.

--
Wayne Boatwright **
____________________________________________

Give me a smart idiot over a stupid genius any day.
Sam Goldwyn, 1882-1974


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Old 07-07-2005, 05:12 AM
Wayne Boatwright
 
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On Wed 06 Jul 2005 08:54:33p, jmcquown wrote in rec.food.cooking:

Damsel wrote:
"jmcquown" said:

Robert Sparkman wrote:

Does anyone have a recipe for gritted cornbread?

Could you describe it better than that? No idea what "gritted"
cornbread is.


All I could think of is cornbread made with part cornmeal and part
grits?

Carol


That sounds awful! Unless the grits were already cooked, then it might
be okay... (doubtful)

Jill


Actually, Jill, it's pretty good. I was short on cornmeal one day and
needed a full pan of cornbread. I cooked enough stone ground grits to
equal 1 cup cooked. Mixed that with 1 cup of stone ground cornmeal and my
usual ingredients. It had a great texture and was incredibly moist. Happy
accident. :-)

--
Wayne Boatwright **
____________________________________________

Give me a smart idiot over a stupid genius any day.
Sam Goldwyn, 1882-1974


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Old 08-07-2005, 01:38 AM
JeanineAlyse
 
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Wayne Boatwright wrote:
On Wed 06 Jul 2005 08:48:11p, JeanineAlyse wrote in rec.food.cooking:



Robert Sparkman wrote:
Hello All,

Does anyone have a recipe for gritted cornbread?

thanks.

Robert

Basically, gritted cornbread can be made with any cornbread recipe or
mix, it's the addition of days-old, somewhat dried out corn off the cob
that is added to the mix to give it the "gritted" attribute. Grate the
corn off the cob using a common grater's largest holes. Try using a
six to six: six or so six days off the plant cobs for grating into a
boxed batter (like Marie Calendar's) before setting the batter to bake.

...Picky ~JA~


Guess that's another way, and it sounds good. However, we always called it
gritted cornbread when it contained stone ground cornmeal and no flour.
The stone ground meal provides the grittiness.

Wayne, I've made it the way you describe, as well as with a mix of
flour and cornmeal. Both are quite good, though I'm not real fond of
the dryer corn-gritty one, though the off the cobs one can become too
chewy and also too dry if the corn becomes too old before using.

....Picky



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Old 08-07-2005, 01:56 AM
Sheldon
 
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JeanineAlyse wrote:
Robert Sparkman wrote:
Hello All,

Does anyone have a recipe for gritted cornbread?

thanks.

Robert

Basically, gritted cornbread can be made with any cornbread recipe or
mix, it's the addition of days-old, somewhat dried out corn off the cob
that is added to the mix to give it the "gritted" attribute. Grate the
corn off the cob using a common grater's largest holes. Try using a
six to six: six or so six days off the plant cobs for grating into a
boxed batter (like Marie Calendar's) before setting the batter to bake.


Total nonsense.

Actually where the OP says "gritted" he means coarser mealed
cornbread.... simply substitute part of the fine ground cornmeal in
your favorite recipe with medium ground cornmeal (I do 1/2 n' 1/2),
which will result in a grittier-chewier product... I much prefer gritty
cornbread/corn muffins too, in fact I detest the cakey/wussy kind like
you typically find in the US south.

Sheldon

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Old 08-07-2005, 02:16 AM
Wayne Boatwright
 
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On Thu 07 Jul 2005 05:38:45p, JeanineAlyse wrote in rec.food.cooking:



Wayne Boatwright wrote:
On Wed 06 Jul 2005 08:48:11p, JeanineAlyse wrote in rec.food.cooking:



Robert Sparkman wrote:
Hello All,

Does anyone have a recipe for gritted cornbread?

thanks.

Robert
Basically, gritted cornbread can be made with any cornbread recipe or
mix, it's the addition of days-old, somewhat dried out corn off the
cob that is added to the mix to give it the "gritted" attribute.
Grate the corn off the cob using a common grater's largest holes.
Try using a six to six: six or so six days off the plant cobs for
grating into a boxed batter (like Marie Calendar's) before setting
the batter to bake.

...Picky ~JA~


Guess that's another way, and it sounds good. However, we always
called it gritted cornbread when it contained stone ground cornmeal and
no flour. The stone ground meal provides the grittiness.

Wayne, I've made it the way you describe, as well as with a mix of
flour and cornmeal. Both are quite good, though I'm not real fond of
the dryer corn-gritty one, though the off the cobs one can become too
chewy and also too dry if the corn becomes too old before using.

...Picky


I think they're all good at some point, and I enjoy them. I was used to
the gritty one as my family has always made it that way, although it never
really seemed dry to me. When I use corn kernals, if they seem a litle
tough I whirl them briefly in the blender with the buttermilk. Seems to
help. The only variety I really don't like is one including flour.

Cheers!

--
Wayne Boatwright **
____________________________________________

Give me a smart idiot over a stupid genius any day.
Sam Goldwyn, 1882-1974


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Old 08-07-2005, 05:27 AM
jmcquown
 
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Sheldon wrote:
JeanineAlyse wrote:
Robert Sparkman wrote:
Hello All,

Does anyone have a recipe for gritted cornbread?

thanks.

Robert

Basically, gritted cornbread can be made with any cornbread recipe or
mix, it's the addition of days-old, somewhat dried out corn off the
cob that is added to the mix to give it the "gritted" attribute.
Grate the corn off the cob using a common grater's largest holes.
Try using a six to six: six or so six days off the plant cobs for
grating into a boxed batter (like Marie Calendar's) before setting
the batter to bake.


Total nonsense.

Actually where the OP says "gritted" he means coarser mealed
cornbread.... simply substitute part of the fine ground cornmeal in
your favorite recipe with medium ground cornmeal (I do 1/2 n' 1/2),
which will result in a grittier-chewier product... I much prefer
gritty cornbread/corn muffins too, in fact I detest the cakey/wussy
kind like you typically find in the US south.

Sheldon


Oh dear. You're wrong about the cakey/wussy kind in the U.S. South. In
fact, it's much more likely you'll find cakey/wussy cornbread with way too
much sugar up in your neck of the woods.

Jill


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Old 08-07-2005, 05:23 PM
Jean B.
 
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JeanineAlyse wrote:


Wayne Boatwright wrote:

On Wed 06 Jul 2005 08:48:11p, JeanineAlyse wrote in rec.food.cooking:



Robert Sparkman wrote:

Hello All,

Does anyone have a recipe for gritted cornbread?

thanks.

Robert

Basically, gritted cornbread can be made with any cornbread recipe or
mix, it's the addition of days-old, somewhat dried out corn off the cob
that is added to the mix to give it the "gritted" attribute. Grate the
corn off the cob using a common grater's largest holes. Try using a
six to six: six or so six days off the plant cobs for grating into a
boxed batter (like Marie Calendar's) before setting the batter to bake.

...Picky ~JA~


Guess that's another way, and it sounds good. However, we always called it
gritted cornbread when it contained stone ground cornmeal and no flour.
The stone ground meal provides the grittiness.


Wayne, I've made it the way you describe, as well as with a mix of
flour and cornmeal. Both are quite good, though I'm not real fond of
the dryer corn-gritty one, though the off the cobs one can become too
chewy and also too dry if the corn becomes too old before using.

...Picky

You can have the best of all worlds by substituting masa harina for the
flour. (IMHO, anyway)

--
Jean B.
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Old 08-07-2005, 05:25 PM
Jean B.
 
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Sheldon wrote:

Actually where the OP says "gritted" he means coarser mealed
cornbread.... simply substitute part of the fine ground cornmeal in
your favorite recipe with medium ground cornmeal (I do 1/2 n' 1/2),
which will result in a grittier-chewier product... I much prefer gritty
cornbread/corn muffins too, in fact I detest the cakey/wussy kind like
you typically find in the US south.

Sheldon

I agree. That cake-like sweet cornbread is just awful! I want a
cornbread with texture and a nice corn flavor.

--
Jean B.


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