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Old 11-01-2019, 10:03 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Blind taste test

Michael Nielsen wrote:
On Thursday, January 10, 2019 at 9:21:27 PM UTC+1, Thomas wrote:
Did Kerrygold butter vs Landolakes. Wife and I on mini bagles.
No diff by any taste. No name butter is 3 bucks per pound, Kerry is ten.
I am glad to try Kerry but the affair is over.
Is there a better butter than what we see?


In Denmark the things to look for a

- is the milk from Denmark or german cows? the cheapest butter is from german milk
- is it conventional or organic? if one doesnt care about organic, organic is often linked to it being made in a more traditional manner which in turn makes it better
- is it unsalted or salted? if saltd, is it "special" salt? butter with special salt is more salted and thus not for baking, but really nice for a charcuterie plate.
- is it "oldfashioned churned" , then the flavour is more pronounced ( often this is linked to being organic



Indeed, I only buy special salted, organic, old-fashioned churned butter
from free range cows that do not speak german.

Those damn Italian cows are the worst.

LOL





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Old 11-01-2019, 10:05 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Blind taste test

graham wrote:
On 2019-01-11 1:19 p.m., Cindy Hamilton wrote:
On Friday, January 11, 2019 at 3:00:54 PM UTC-5, dsi1 wrote:
On Thursday, January 10, 2019 at 10:21:27 AM UTC-10, Thomas wrote:
Did Kerrygold butter vs Landolakes. Wife and I on mini bagles.
No diff by any taste. No name butter is 3 bucks per pound, Kerry is
ten.
I am glad to try Kerry but the affair is over.
Is there a better butter than what we see?

A lot of folks have an inflated sense of the sensitivity and ability
in analyzing what their eating. Why is that? I don't know. It's the
same way with guitar players and audiophiles. They think they can
hear the gauge of wire that their signals are traveling through their
pickups or speaker cables.

https://gizmodo.com/dont-buy-what-ne...ing-1678446860


There is a good deal of variation in sensory apparatus. Some people
can detect quite a bit of nuance; other people cannot. Some people's
taste buds are extra-sensitive to certain flavors (notably cilantro);
others' are not.

Anything you think you know about how something tastes is unique to you,
and cannot be extrapolated to anyone else.

Cindy Hamilton

This certainly applies to wine! I've read too many descriptions from
pompous palates that claim to detect flavours of, say, black raspberry
along with a veritable fruit salad of flavours.


Ha ha ha. You forgot to mention about a hundred types of leather, wood,
charcoal, etc.

It all tastes like grape wine ... some good, some bad.


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Old 11-01-2019, 10:07 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Blind taste test

On 2019-01-11 4:40 p.m., Cindy Hamilton wrote:
On Friday, January 11, 2019 at 4:27:26 PM UTC-5, graham wrote:


Anything you think you know about how something tastes is unique to you,
and cannot be extrapolated to anyone else.

Cindy Hamilton

This certainly applies to wine! I've read too many descriptions from
pompous palates that claim to detect flavours of, say, black raspberry
along with a veritable fruit salad of flavours.


I can taste notes of cherry or berry in the coffee that we prefer. Provided
that I don't brew it too weak or too strong.


Some of them can string a pretty good line, but there are people with
sophisticated palates that can actually sense those tastes, and panels
of people who can come up with the independently. Then there are those
who go to wine tastings and the tour guide will tell them what they
should be tasting and the saps with swallow it.

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Old 11-01-2019, 10:41 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Blind taste test

On Friday, January 11, 2019 at 12:06:23 PM UTC-10, Dave Smith wrote:
On 2019-01-11 4:40 p.m., Cindy Hamilton wrote:
On Friday, January 11, 2019 at 4:27:26 PM UTC-5, graham wrote:


Anything you think you know about how something tastes is unique to you,
and cannot be extrapolated to anyone else.

Cindy Hamilton

This certainly applies to wine! I've read too many descriptions from
pompous palates that claim to detect flavours of, say, black raspberry
along with a veritable fruit salad of flavours.


I can taste notes of cherry or berry in the coffee that we prefer. Provided
that I don't brew it too weak or too strong.


Some of them can string a pretty good line, but there are people with
sophisticated palates that can actually sense those tastes, and panels
of people who can come up with the independently. Then there are those
who go to wine tastings and the tour guide will tell them what they
should be tasting and the saps with swallow it.


If you can taste the difference between sliced up coffee beans vs ground coffee beans, I'd like to shake your hands! Anybody that has half a brain and has brewed a cup or two will know that what's important when making coffee is the amount of coffee you use and the freshness of the beans.

I suppose water plays a part too - but it shouldn't. I had some coffee in a big restaurant in FL and they used the tap water to brew the coffee. I took a sip and then spit it out. Their water had the odor of decaying organic material. It was hard to take a shower in that stinkin' water. As it goes, I had no choice. All I can say is "now I know."
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Old 12-01-2019, 05:51 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Blind taste test

On 1/11/2019 3:57 PM, Michael Nielsen wrote:
On Thursday, January 10, 2019 at 9:21:27 PM UTC+1, Thomas wrote:
Did Kerrygold butter vs Landolakes. Wife and I on mini bagles.
No diff by any taste. No name butter is 3 bucks per pound, Kerry is ten.
I am glad to try Kerry but the affair is over.
Is there a better butter than what we see?


In Denmark the things to look for a

- is the milk from Denmark or german cows? the cheapest butter is from german milk
- is it conventional or organic? if one doesnt care about organic, organic is often linked to it being made in a more traditional manner which in turn makes it better
- is it unsalted or salted? if saltd, is it "special" salt? butter with special salt is more salted and thus not for baking, but really nice for a charcuterie plate.
- is it "oldfashioned churned" , then the flavour is more pronounced ( often this is linked to being organic


I'm sure you know Kerrygold is imported Irish butter and Land O' Lakes
is made in the US. Observations about Danish butter production is
rather irrelevant.

IMHO, the difference in taste between Land O' Lakes and Kerrygold is the
amount of butterfat. If Thomas can't taste the difference then I
suggest he stick with what he prefers rather than pay more for a name.

I like Kerrygold. I love it on toasted sourdough bread. But I also buy
store brand butter. Compared to Land O' Lakes, it's exactly the same
thing except it usually costs less. Unless Land O' Lakes goes on sale.

Jill


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Old 12-01-2019, 06:15 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Blind taste test

On 1/11/2019 9:58 AM, Nancy Young wrote:
On 1/11/2019 4:49 AM, Wayne Boatwright wrote:
On Thu 10 Jan 2019 09:15:21p, Nancy Young told us...


Ditto, it would be a splurge but I'd have to get that once in a
while. Just for where you'd notice it, on bread.


I really like using European butter on good bread, when I make
shortbread, and melted on spaghetti or fetuchini with a bit of fresh
shaved garlic and fesh herbs.


I do get Kerrygold at Costco for the butter bell, I confess.* I don't
go through a package too fast so it lasts a while.* I never would
think to use it to bake but your fettuccine sounds delicious.

nancy


The butter tossed with fettucini (or spaghetti or angel hair, my
favorite) sounds quite tasty. I'd likely add a dash of olive oil and a
dash of red pepper flakes to the seasoning along with the garlic and
herbs. I'd also sprinkle the finished pasta with freshly grated
parmesan.

Thing is, for tossing with pasta, it's not really necessary to spend
$10-12 for the butter. JMHO, of course.

Jill
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Old 14-01-2019, 11:47 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Blind taste test

jmcquown wrote:

On 1/11/2019 3:57 PM, Michael Nielsen wrote:
On Thursday, January 10, 2019 at 9:21:27 PM UTC+1, Thomas wrote:
Did Kerrygold butter vs Landolakes. Wife and I on mini bagles.
No diff by any taste. No name butter is 3 bucks per pound, Kerry
is ten. I am glad to try Kerry but the affair is over.
Is there a better butter than what we see?


In Denmark the things to look for a

- is the milk from Denmark or german cows? the cheapest butter is
from german milk - is it conventional or organic? if one doesnt
care about organic, organic is often linked to it being made in a
more traditional manner which in turn makes it better - is it
unsalted or salted? if saltd, is it "special" salt? butter with
special salt is more salted and thus not for baking, but really
nice for a charcuterie plate. - is it "oldfashioned churned" ,
then the flavour is more pronounced ( often this is linked to being
organic

I'm sure you know Kerrygold is imported Irish butter and Land O'
Lakes is made in the US. Observations about Danish butter production
is rather irrelevant.

IMHO, the difference in taste between Land O' Lakes and Kerrygold is
the amount of butterfat. If Thomas can't taste the difference then I
suggest he stick with what he prefers rather than pay more for a name.

I like Kerrygold. I love it on toasted sourdough bread. But I also
buy store brand butter. Compared to Land O' Lakes, it's exactly the
same thing except it usually costs less. Unless Land O' Lakes goes
on sale.

Jill


I note no diffeence either in LOL and store brand butter. If there was
one once, then LOL has dummied down to remove it.


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