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Old 26-06-2008, 09:20 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Speaking of the five-minute artisan bread book

I just took a lump of the artisan bread out of the fridge, let it rise,
rolled it out, filled it with a butter/sugar/cinnamon mixture, coiled it
in a pie plate, let it rise a bit more, brushed it with egg wash, then
baked it.

James says "This is one of the best things you've ever made me, and
that's saying something."

That makes the book worth the dollar I spent on it. ;-)

Serene
--
"I think I have an umami receptor that has developed sentience." -- Stef

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Old 26-06-2008, 11:43 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Speaking of the five-minute artisan bread book

Serene Vannoy wrote:
I just took a lump of the artisan bread out of the fridge, let it
rise, rolled it out, filled it with a butter/sugar/cinnamon mixture,
coiled it in a pie plate, let it rise a bit more, brushed it with egg
wash, then baked it.

James says "This is one of the best things you've ever made me, and
that's saying something."

That makes the book worth the dollar I spent on it. ;-)

Serene


Dang, I'll bet your kitchen smelled heavenly!

kili


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Old 26-06-2008, 02:52 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Speaking of the five-minute artisan bread book

In article ,
Serene Vannoy wrote:

I just took a lump of the artisan bread out of the fridge, let it rise,
rolled it out, filled it with a butter/sugar/cinnamon mixture, coiled it
in a pie plate, let it rise a bit more, brushed it with egg wash, then
baked it.

James says "This is one of the best things you've ever made me, and
that's saying something."

That makes the book worth the dollar I spent on it. ;-)

Serene


How'd you fill it, Serene? I'm not tracking with " filled it with a
butter/sugar/cinnamon mixture, coiled it in a pie plate. . . ." Did you
roll it flat and spread the butter mixture and roll it like a jelly roll
before coiling it in the pie plate.

Sounds good. Thanks.
--
-Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
Huffy and Bubbles Do France: http://www.jamlady.eboard.com
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Old 26-06-2008, 08:21 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Speaking of the five-minute artisan bread book

Melba's Jammin' wrote:
In article ,
Serene Vannoy wrote:

I just took a lump of the artisan bread out of the fridge, let it rise,
rolled it out, filled it with a butter/sugar/cinnamon mixture, coiled it
in a pie plate, let it rise a bit more, brushed it with egg wash, then
baked it.

James says "This is one of the best things you've ever made me, and
that's saying something."

That makes the book worth the dollar I spent on it. ;-)

Serene


How'd you fill it, Serene? I'm not tracking with " filled it with a
butter/sugar/cinnamon mixture, coiled it in a pie plate. . . ." Did you
roll it flat and spread the butter mixture and roll it like a jelly roll
before coiling it in the pie plate.


Yep, exactly, and while I thought I might try for a whole coil, it was
really only enough dough to make a circle. I'll try to take pics next
time. Next time, I also may skimp on (or skip) the butter and see how
it goes. It was *delicious*, and almost fried on the bottom, but a lot
of the butter just oozed out.

Serene
--
"I think I have an umami receptor that has developed sentience." -- Stef
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Old 26-06-2008, 08:35 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Speaking of the five-minute artisan bread book

Gregory Morrow wrote:
Serene Vannoy wrote:

I just took a lump of the artisan bread out of the fridge, let it rise,
rolled it out, filled it with a butter/sugar/cinnamon mixture, coiled it
in a pie plate, let it rise a bit more, brushed it with egg wash, then
baked it.

James says "This is one of the best things you've ever made me, and
that's saying something."



See, that's what I like about this technique, so easy and so versatile...


That makes the book worth the dollar I spent on it. ;-)



Where'd you get it for a dollar, online somewheres...???



Yeah. It was my intro book for BOMC2:
http://www.bomc2.com/ecom/pages/nm/nmhomepage.jsp

(BOMC2 used to be Zooba.)

Serene

--
"I think I have an umami receptor that has developed sentience." -- Stef


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Old 26-06-2008, 08:35 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Speaking of the five-minute artisan bread book

Gregory Morrow wrote:
Serene Vannoy wrote:

I just took a lump of the artisan bread out of the fridge, let it rise,
rolled it out, filled it with a butter/sugar/cinnamon mixture, coiled it
in a pie plate, let it rise a bit more, brushed it with egg wash, then
baked it.

James says "This is one of the best things you've ever made me, and
that's saying something."



See, that's what I like about this technique, so easy and so versatile...


That makes the book worth the dollar I spent on it. ;-)



Where'd you get it for a dollar, online somewheres...???



Oh, and I misremembered -- the book was free, not a dollar. :-)

Serene

--
"I think I have an umami receptor that has developed sentience." -- Stef
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Old 26-06-2008, 08:41 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Speaking of the five-minute artisan bread book


Serene Vannoy wrote:

I just took a lump of the artisan bread out of the fridge, let it rise,
rolled it out, filled it with a butter/sugar/cinnamon mixture, coiled it
in a pie plate, let it rise a bit more, brushed it with egg wash, then
baked it.

James says "This is one of the best things you've ever made me, and
that's saying something."



See, that's what I like about this technique, so easy and so versatile...


That makes the book worth the dollar I spent on it. ;-)



Where'd you get it for a dollar, online somewheres...???


--
Best
Greg



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Old 26-06-2008, 09:42 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Speaking of the five-minute artisan bread book

On Thu 26 Jun 2008 12:21:21p, Serene Vannoy told us...

Melba's Jammin' wrote:
In article ,
Serene Vannoy wrote:

I just took a lump of the artisan bread out of the fridge, let it rise,
rolled it out, filled it with a butter/sugar/cinnamon mixture, coiled

it
in a pie plate, let it rise a bit more, brushed it with egg wash, then
baked it.

James says "This is one of the best things you've ever made me, and
that's saying something."

That makes the book worth the dollar I spent on it. ;-)

Serene


How'd you fill it, Serene? I'm not tracking with " filled it with a
butter/sugar/cinnamon mixture, coiled it in a pie plate. . . ." Did you
roll it flat and spread the butter mixture and roll it like a jelly roll
before coiling it in the pie plate.


Yep, exactly, and while I thought I might try for a whole coil, it was
really only enough dough to make a circle. I'll try to take pics next
time. Next time, I also may skimp on (or skip) the butter and see how
it goes. It was *delicious*, and almost fried on the bottom, but a lot
of the butter just oozed out.

Serene


That was my experience the first time I ever made cinnamon raisin
bread...too much butter. The results was delicious, but like yours, it was
almost fried on the bottom and the butter oozed out.

What I've done since is use a pastry brush to lightly coat the rolled out
dough with butter, then add the sugar/cinnamon mixture on top of it. Seems
to work well for me.

--
Wayne Boatwright
-------------------------------------------
Thursday, 06(VI)/26(XXVI)/08(MMVIII)
-------------------------------------------
-------------------------------------------
Smoke me a kipper, I'll be back for
breakfast.
-------------------------------------------



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Old 26-06-2008, 09:51 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Speaking of the five-minute artisan bread book

Serene Vannoy wrote:
I just took a lump of the artisan bread out of the fridge, let it
rise, rolled it out, filled it with a butter/sugar/cinnamon mixture,
coiled it in a pie plate, let it rise a bit more, brushed it with egg
wash, then baked it.

James says "This is one of the best things you've ever made me, and
that's saying something."

That makes the book worth the dollar I spent on it. ;-)


Good stuff


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Old 26-06-2008, 09:52 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Speaking of the five-minute artisan bread book

Wayne Boatwright wrote:

That was my experience the first time I ever made cinnamon raisin
bread...too much butter. The results was delicious, but like yours, it was
almost fried on the bottom and the butter oozed out.

What I've done since is use a pastry brush to lightly coat the rolled out
dough with butter, then add the sugar/cinnamon mixture on top of it. Seems
to work well for me.


I'll try that; thanks!

Serene
--
"I think I have an umami receptor that has developed sentience." -- Stef


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Old 26-06-2008, 09:58 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Speaking of the five-minute artisan bread book

On Thu 26 Jun 2008 01:52:04p, Serene Vannoy told us...

Wayne Boatwright wrote:

That was my experience the first time I ever made cinnamon raisin
bread...too much butter. The results was delicious, but like yours, it
was almost fried on the bottom and the butter oozed out.

What I've done since is use a pastry brush to lightly coat the rolled
out dough with butter, then add the sugar/cinnamon mixture on top of
it. Seems to work well for me.


I'll try that; thanks!

Serene


You're very welcome. Let me know how it works for you.

--
Wayne Boatwright
-------------------------------------------
Thursday, 06(VI)/26(XXVI)/08(MMVIII)
-------------------------------------------
-------------------------------------------
I would hate to see my virtual water
bill. . . .
-------------------------------------------



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Old 26-06-2008, 11:46 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Speaking of the five-minute artisan bread book




I just took a lump of the artisan bread out of the fridge, let it rise,


My artisan bread won't rise a second time, after I take a piece out of
the fridge. What factors might I look at in this connection?

TIA
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Old 27-06-2008, 12:09 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Speaking of the five-minute artisan bread book

Cuthbert Thistlethwaite wrote:


I just took a lump of the artisan bread out of the fridge, let it rise,


My artisan bread won't rise a second time, after I take a piece out of
the fridge. What factors might I look at in this connection?

TIA


The book says not to worry about the rise before baking. It's got plenty
of oven spring.

Serene

--
"I think I have an umami receptor that has developed sentience." -- Stef
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Old 27-06-2008, 12:32 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Speaking of the five-minute artisan bread book



The book says not to worry about the rise before baking. It's got plenty
of oven spring.


That's not what's happening. I've been using the recipe posted here a
couple of weeks ago, and using an 8x4 glass loaf pan.

The dough rises when first made; then collapses a little. I bake about
a pound right away, without much rising in the oven. Then I put the
rest of the dough away, in the fridge. When I take another pound out in
a couple of days, I let it sit out for about an hour, but no more rising
happens. In the oven, it does not rise again, and I'm getting nice
little loaves, about the size of a pound cake, but only perhaps two
inches high.

Maybe I'd better look at that book.

You encouraged me to use the loaf pan because I didn't want a boule
loaf, and you were quite right; the loaf pan is successful. Thanks for
that!
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Old 27-06-2008, 02:33 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Speaking of the five-minute artisan bread book

Cuthbert Thistlethwaite wrote:

The book says not to worry about the rise before baking. It's got plenty
of oven spring.


That's not what's happening. I've been using the recipe posted here a
couple of weeks ago, and using an 8x4 glass loaf pan.


Are you pre-heating the pan? I'd recommend either a baking stone or a
metal pan, pre-heated. (Or pre-heating the glass pan, but that makes me
wonder if not-good things will happen when cold dough hits hot pan.)

Serene
--
"I think I have an umami receptor that has developed sentience." -- Stef


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