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Old 08-02-2013, 10:49 PM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Default OT (sort of): Low GI carrots for the garden?

Hi All,

Okay, okay, not to spoil the movie for you, but you
have to know the dinosaur dies in the end and... What?
Oh, wrong group. So no movie spoiler for you guys.
Sorry.

This question may be somewhat off topic, but perhaps not.
I am going through the planning stages for this
year's garden.

Is there a such think as a low Glycemic index (GI) carrot?
Heirloom variety perhaps?

And, if you guys have gardens, what low GI stuff do you
grow?

Last years failed attempt was tomatoes, zucchini,
lemon cucumbers, purslane. Everything went to seed
with the hot weather and I under watered my tomatoes.
My zukes got white mold.

Speaking of Purslane, purslane a great low GI super
food. (Depending on who you listen to, the most nutritious
edible plant on the face of the earth.) Tastes a little
like watercress. Grows like a weed too, meaning it is hard
for me to ruin.

-T

The guy gets the girl. Perhaps. (I will reform, eventually.)

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Old 09-02-2013, 01:23 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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On 02/08/2013 04:07 PM, W. Baker wrote:
Why are you blasting tht chicken soup for 99 + mns?


Great question. The short answer is: Proline, Glycine and Gelatin.
It is because I need to break down the bones to get at these three.

An out take of the following article:
http://www.westonaprice.org/food-fea...h-is-beautiful

According to a textbook on bone disorders, proline
and glycine play starring roles in the collagenous
fibers built from gigantic proteins containing some
1,000 amino acids each. Glycine contributes one-third
of the total aminos. Glycine is a tiny amino with a
talent for structuring very tightly packed chains.
The other aminos that figure prominently are proline
and hydroxyproline, an uncommon team with a passion
for twisting themselves into tightly wound,
left-handed helixes, then switching directions and
twisting to the right into a superhelix. These little
twisters form tight, tough, rodlike macro molecules,
which in turn form thicker rods called fibrils. No
wonder cartilage can have such impressive tensile
strength.

I get about 14 cups worth -- freeze half of it. I do have
to dilute my broth with water. First shot was 1 to 1; second
shot was 1 broth to 2 water. It is so good. I feel like
a king. Real comfort food -- better than mac and cheese.

Good catch by the way. I screw a lot of stuff up. I really
appreciate you looking over my back!

this dish is often referred
to as Jewish Penicillin and it works! Broth the first day then add
vegetables ad a litle chicken after that.


Hear! Hear! (Make me almost want to get sick. Almost.)

-T

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Old 09-02-2013, 01:27 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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On 02/08/2013 04:23 PM, Todd wrote:
Proline, Glycine and Gelatin.
It is because I need to break down the bones to get at these three.


If the bones smash or start to crumble under touch,
you have got it right.
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Old 09-02-2013, 01:28 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Default OT (sort of): Low GI carrots for the garden?

On 02/08/2013 04:27 PM, Todd wrote:
On 02/08/2013 04:23 PM, Todd wrote:
Proline, Glycine and Gelatin.
It is because I need to break down the bones to get at these three.


If the bones smash or start to crumble under touch,
you have got it right.


Hunter gathers let nothing go to waste. They ate the marrow too.
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Old 09-02-2013, 06:52 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Default OT (sort of): Low GI carrots for the garden?


"Todd" wrote in message
.. Hi
Absolutely.

The community carrots never make it to the cooked stage. Sometimes
they don't even make it to the refrigerator. (I cuts them up and
add them to the community tomatoes that got crushed in the bad
and feast.) I mainly use cooked carrots as "seasoning".

Was hoping for a variety of carrot to grow that was the most
T2 friendly. (Man their seeds are tiny!)


I eat store bought carrots all the time. They taste fine and they don't
spike me. Again, there is no one food that we all eat or don't eat.




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Old 09-02-2013, 07:31 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Default OT (sort of): Low GI carrots for the garden?

On 02/08/2013 09:52 PM, Julie Bove wrote:
"Todd" wrote in message
.. Hi
Absolutely.

The community carrots never make it to the cooked stage. Sometimes
they don't even make it to the refrigerator. (I cuts them up and
add them to the community tomatoes that got crushed in the bad
and feast.) I mainly use cooked carrots as "seasoning".

Was hoping for a variety of carrot to grow that was the most
T2 friendly. (Man their seeds are tiny!)


I eat store bought carrots all the time. They taste fine and they don't
spike me. Again, there is no one food that we all eat or don't eat.


Hi Julie,

I eat store bought carrots in the winter when my local community
grower is closed. There is no comparison against a real carrot.
The first time I bought them, they stunk up the car so bad that
I almost went crazy not pulling aver and devouring them on the
spot. Imagine carrots that smell good. And *A LOT* of smell.
The stunk up my house getting them inside too. They did not
last very long. (Yes, I shared with my wife.)

I have a theory (not the first to come up with it) that the
reason people avoid produce is that it tastes like crap. If you
ever manage to find a community grower, you will know what I
mean. I have to discipline myself or I'd buy everything. It
tastes so good. You really have to find one of these growers!
(Fun to feed the chickens [the "Ladies"] too. They will explain
it to you when you get there.)

It has been said that every family needs three things:
1) their own doctor, 2) their own dentist, and 3) their own
farmer. :-)

-T

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Old 09-02-2013, 07:52 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Default OT (sort of): Low GI carrots for the garden?

Todd wrote:
On 02/08/2013 09:52 PM, Julie Bove wrote:
"Todd" wrote in message
.. Hi
Absolutely.

The community carrots never make it to the cooked stage. Sometimes
they don't even make it to the refrigerator. (I cuts them up and
add them to the community tomatoes that got crushed in the bad
and feast.) I mainly use cooked carrots as "seasoning".

Was hoping for a variety of carrot to grow that was the most
T2 friendly. (Man their seeds are tiny!)


I eat store bought carrots all the time. They taste fine and they
don't spike me. Again, there is no one food that we all eat or
don't eat.


Hi Julie,

I eat store bought carrots in the winter when my local community
grower is closed. There is no comparison against a real carrot.
The first time I bought them, they stunk up the car so bad that
I almost went crazy not pulling aver and devouring them on the
spot. Imagine carrots that smell good. And *A LOT* of smell.
The stunk up my house getting them inside too. They did not
last very long. (Yes, I shared with my wife.)


I have grown carrots. I have gotten them when I had a CSA box. I noticed
*no* difference whatever.

I have a theory (not the first to come up with it) that the
reason people avoid produce is that it tastes like crap. If you
ever manage to find a community grower, you will know what I
mean. I have to discipline myself or I'd buy everything. It
tastes so good. You really have to find one of these growers!
(Fun to feed the chickens [the "Ladies"] too. They will explain
it to you when you get there.)


Produce doesn't taste like crap. Vegetables are my favorite foods with some
exceptions. I have an extreme dislike for broccoli, Brussel sprouts,
asparagus, avocados and cooked cauliflower. Raw cauliflower tastes okay but
it's not something I'd seek out. Also dislike parsnips.

My grandparents had chickens as did my best friend when I was growing up.
So nobody needs to explain chickens to me.

It has been said that every family needs three things:
1) their own doctor, 2) their own dentist, and 3) their own
farmer. :-)


Don't know who said that but if your produce is bad, then you need to find
another store. We get very good produce here and most stores have a good
selection of organic. I avoid the Farmer's Markets. I have seen what they
are selling and bought some a couple of times. It is often rotting or close
to it and very over priced.


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Old 09-02-2013, 08:38 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Default OT (sort of): Low GI carrots for the garden?

On 02/08/2013 10:52 PM, Julie Bove wrote:
My grandparents had chickens as did my best friend when I was growing up.
So nobody needs to explain chickens to me.



I was referring to full circle farming. In the chicken --
out the chicken -- in the soil -- in the plant --
out the plant -- back into the chicken. Sometimes
other livestock is used.

Most commercial produce is bread for two purposes:
1) to lay flat in a shipping container and 2) not
to rot in the container. This is one of the reasons
why it tastes like crap. Another reason is that
commercial produce is very seldom grown full circle,
not even organic produce. Plus commercial organic
produce is picked so green is bad for you.

Oh I so know what you mean about the farmers markets.
You are blessed to have good source of produce at
your stores. I too love my produce (grown right).

Everyone needs there own farmer. (I have come to
so enjoy picking my own tomatoes, peppers, and
egg plant. $2.99/lb.)

Oh! Have you tried real spinach. Spinach is not flat.
Only the hybridized stuff lays flat in a shipping container.
Which is probably why is tastes like crap. The real stuff
is all crinkly. I was thinking of trying to grow some
real heirloom spinach to see how much different it tastes.
Have you tried any heirloom spiniches.

-T
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Old 09-02-2013, 09:13 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Default OT (sort of): Low GI carrots for the garden?


"Todd" wrote in message
...
On 02/08/2013 10:52 PM, Julie Bove wrote:
My grandparents had chickens as did my best friend when I was growing up.
So nobody needs to explain chickens to me.



I was referring to full circle farming. In the chicken --
out the chicken -- in the soil -- in the plant --
out the plant -- back into the chicken. Sometimes
other livestock is used.


That's generally how farming is done. Isn't it? That's the way it's done
here!

Most commercial produce is bread for two purposes:
1) to lay flat in a shipping container and 2) not
to rot in the container. This is one of the reasons
why it tastes like crap. Another reason is that
commercial produce is very seldom grown full circle,
not even organic produce. Plus commercial organic
produce is picked so green is bad for you.


Huh? How could produce be bread?

Again... Our produce here does not taste like crap. Funny you should
mention the name Full Circle. That's the name of the farm that I used to
get my CSA box from. But we quit getting it. There was just too much fruit
in there and we're not big fruit eaters. Well, husband is, but he wouldn't
eat what was in the box.

I'm sorry if the produce tastes like crap where you live. I have lived in
WA, CA, MA, PA and NY. The only place where produce could be a problem was
MA. I lived on the Cape and nothing was grown locally. It wasn't so much
that it tasted bad. But it wasn't always fresh.

Not all commercial produce is picked "green" as you say and some of it
starts out green. Like lettuce. I think there is a lot you don't know
about farming and produce. Again, I come from a long line of farmers and
for much of my life I did have a garden. I gave up on having one here.
What I did grow tasted no better than what I can get at the store. Used to
be the home grown tomatoes tasted better. That's not the case any more.
Not here anyway.

Oh I so know what you mean about the farmers markets.
You are blessed to have good source of produce at
your stores. I too love my produce (grown right).

Everyone needs there own farmer. (I have come to
so enjoy picking my own tomatoes, peppers, and
egg plant. $2.99/lb.)


That's very expensive! Where do you live where it costs that much? I am
lucky to have Winco here where produce is cheap.

Oh! Have you tried real spinach. Spinach is not flat.
Only the hybridized stuff lays flat in a shipping container.
Which is probably why is tastes like crap. The real stuff
is all crinkly. I was thinking of trying to grow some
real heirloom spinach to see how much different it tastes.
Have you tried any heirloom spiniches.


Good gravy! Some spinach is flat. Okay... Some background. Not only do I
come from a long line of farmers but... I used to be the Garden Shop
manager at K Mart. Please to not try to tell me about gardening. No, I am
not a master gardener. But I attended enough gardening conventions that I
do know a tad about it. And yes, I have grown plenty of spinach and other
greens. They are one of the few things one can almost always grow with
success in this climate here in the PNW. I have not tried heirloom spinach
and I don't eat much spinach at all. Greens are something I don't digest
very well.

I have not honestly noticed too much difference between heirloom tomatoes
and regular ones as far as the taste goes. The heirloom ones do come in
pretty colors and can look ugly. I picked up a bag of some sort of tomatoes
at Central Market the other day. Wonderful things. They look like Campari
but I don't think that's exactly what they are. Was only $2.99 for a huge
bag. I have a few leftovers that I will be putting in my soup tomorrow.
Also some green beans, carrots, celery, potatoes, onions and still need to
buy a zucchini. I would put a small amount of spinach if I could actually
buy a small amount but AFAIK, Winco doesn't sell it loose and they have no
salad bar. So I will make do with what I have. Will also put a can of some
kind of white beans in there. Some ground beef that I have in the freezer.
And some tomato juice and maybe beef broth. I think I will pick up some
fresh parsley too. Ahhhhhh.


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Old 09-02-2013, 09:15 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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"Todd" wrote in message
...
On 02/08/2013 04:27 PM, Todd wrote:
On 02/08/2013 04:23 PM, Todd wrote:
Proline, Glycine and Gelatin.
It is because I need to break down the bones to get at these three.


If the bones smash or start to crumble under touch,
you have got it right.


Hunter gathers let nothing go to waste. They ate the marrow too.


So do some gourmands.




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Old 09-02-2013, 05:56 PM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Julie Bove wrote:

: "Todd" wrote in message
: Proline, Glycine and Gelatin.
: It is because I need to break down the bones to get at these three.
:
: If the bones smash or start to crumble under touch,
: you have got it right.
:
: Hunter gathers let nothing go to waste. They ate the marrow too.

: So do some gourmands.

Ever heard of Osso bucco? Delightful dish of shank bones with meat and
marrow and a wonderful sauce , finished with a gremolata. Nw there is
gourmet eating. they even sometimes give you tiny spoons to get at that
marrow. What a rich tasting treat!Ihav even cooked it once or twice, but
I find it hard to get the special shanks.

Wendy

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Old 09-02-2013, 06:04 PM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Julie Bove wrote:

: "Todd" wrote in message
:
: Most commercial produce is bread for two purposes:
: 1) to lay flat in a shipping container and 2) not
: to rot in the container. This is one of the reasons
: why it tastes like crap. Another reason is that
: commercial produce is very seldom grown full circle,
: not even organic produce. Plus commercial organic
: produce is picked so green is bad for you.

: Huh? How could produce be bread?

Try bred.

Wendy
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Old 09-02-2013, 07:48 PM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Default OT (sort of): Low GI carrots for the garden?

if I recall..Alton Brown did a funny segment where his grandmother took 4
days to make hers and his was like yours..30 minutes.
it was funny.

KROM


"W. Baker" wrote ...

Why are you blasting tht chicken soup for 99 + mns? When I do chicken
soup in my pressure cooker I cook it for about 25-30 mins and it is
servable with both the vegetables and the chicken in it as a nice one dish
meal

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Old 09-02-2013, 09:22 PM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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"W. Baker" wrote in message
...
Julie Bove wrote:

: "Todd" wrote in message
: Proline, Glycine and Gelatin.
: It is because I need to break down the bones to get at these three.
:
: If the bones smash or start to crumble under touch,
: you have got it right.
:
: Hunter gathers let nothing go to waste. They ate the marrow too.

: So do some gourmands.

Ever heard of Osso bucco? Delightful dish of shank bones with meat and
marrow and a wonderful sauce , finished with a gremolata. Nw there is
gourmet eating. they even sometimes give you tiny spoons to get at that
marrow. What a rich tasting treat!Ihav even cooked it once or twice, but
I find it hard to get the special shanks.

Wendy


I've heard of it but it is not at all appealing to me.


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Old 09-02-2013, 09:23 PM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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"W. Baker" wrote in message
...
Julie Bove wrote:

: "Todd" wrote in message
:
: Most commercial produce is bread for two purposes:
: 1) to lay flat in a shipping container and 2) not
: to rot in the container. This is one of the reasons
: why it tastes like crap. Another reason is that
: commercial produce is very seldom grown full circle,
: not even organic produce. Plus commercial organic
: produce is picked so green is bad for you.

: Huh? How could produce be bread?

Try bred.


Okay. I guess that makes sense. But I think "grown" would be a better
word. You don't really breed produce.




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