Winemaking (rec.crafts.winemaking) Discussion of the process, recipes, tips, techniques and general exchange of lore on the process, methods and history of wine making. Includes traditional grape wines, sparkling wines & champagnes.

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  #1 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 29-12-2003, 03:46 AM
Rick Vanderwal
 
Posts: n/a
Default raspberry wine advice

Tonight I just pressed two gallons of pure raspberry juice from the 18 or so
pounds I had frozen from my bushes this summer.

I've read a number of recipes...and I guess I'd like some advice as to what
to do....

1. Use the two gallons to make two gallons of really rich wine?
2. Dilute it to make a larger quanitity, but less acidic wine? And if
so, how much water should I add for dilution? Could I add double the
water, to bring the total to four gallons? or even five? But would that
water it down too much?
3. Buy a can of Oregon pure seedless raspberry puree and add it to what I
have and bring the total to five gallons for lots of flavourful wine?

I have the juice sitting in the garage in a closed bucket, so i'd love to
act on it quickly. The temperature is 40 degrees so it should hold for a
day or two. Any advice would be greatly appreciated! Thanks! You guys
and gals are always a lot of help!!!

Sincerely, Rick Vanderwal
Fremont, Michigan




  #2 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 29-12-2003, 12:55 PM
Ben Rotter
 
Posts: n/a
Default raspberry wine advice

Rick Vanderwal wrote:

1. Use the two gallons to make two gallons of really rich wine?


Being an advocate of 100% juice wines I'd say go for it! But *as long
as* you can produce a balanced wine from that juice. I would recommend
you check your TA and reduce with carbonate if necessary.

2. Dilute it to make a larger quanitity, but less acidic wine? And if
so, how much water should I add for dilution? Could I add double the
water, to bring the total to four gallons? or even five? But would that
water it down too much?


When raspberry wine is diluted, it's often reduced in concentration by
3-5 times. If you are diluting for balance reasons alone, as you
indicate: I'd again suggest you check the TA and dilute only enough to
give a reasonable TA, but no further. There is no point in diluting
beyond that and then having to add acid blend, unless your aim is to
change the acid profile of the wine.

3. Buy a can of Oregon pure seedless raspberry puree and add it to what I
have and bring the total to five gallons for lots of flavourful wine?


If you are happy with the quality of the puree (flavour and acid wise)
and you can gain considerable volume from it, why not. Again I'd
stress the balance issue though.

Ben
http://members.tripod.com/~BRotter/100juice.htm
  #3 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 29-12-2003, 01:06 PM
Rick Vanderwal
 
Posts: n/a
Default raspberry wine advice

I'm going to assume that the proper TA would be around .65 for a fruit
wine....

I do think I would like a larger volume of wine....
2 gallons for all those raspberries and all that work will only yield me 10
bottles, and if it turns our really good, I'd rather have 15 or 20 rather
than 10.... I once had some raspberry wine and it was HEAVENLY! Very
rich, balanced, strong raspberry flavour. This past summer I had some
raspberry wine and you could barely taste the raspberry....I definitely
would like to have it closer to the first one I tried and not the latter....
So I want to keep a strong flavoru concentration...

One thing I also did last night I forgot to write about....I took all the
pulp and seeds that I had extrated using the Victorio Strainer and the Berry
screen....so, absolutely no seeds in the juice... But I took the seeds and
leftover pulp, put it in a straining bag, and poured hot water over it,
extracting all the nice red colour and aroma from the remaining pulp. I'll
only leave it on there one day or so...so I don't pick up any strange
flavours from the seeds. So that might be another 1/2 gallon of
"juice"....not as strong as the extracted juice, but still pretty
flavourful.

Thanks for your ideas. Will still welcome other comments if there's
anything else to add by anyone. Thanks again.

Rick Vanderwal
"Ben Rotter" wrote in message
om...
Rick Vanderwal wrote:

1. Use the two gallons to make two gallons of really rich wine?


Being an advocate of 100% juice wines I'd say go for it! But *as long
as* you can produce a balanced wine from that juice. I would recommend
you check your TA and reduce with carbonate if necessary.

2. Dilute it to make a larger quanitity, but less acidic wine? And

if
so, how much water should I add for dilution? Could I add double the
water, to bring the total to four gallons? or even five? But would

that
water it down too much?


When raspberry wine is diluted, it's often reduced in concentration by
3-5 times. If you are diluting for balance reasons alone, as you
indicate: I'd again suggest you check the TA and dilute only enough to
give a reasonable TA, but no further. There is no point in diluting
beyond that and then having to add acid blend, unless your aim is to
change the acid profile of the wine.

3. Buy a can of Oregon pure seedless raspberry puree and add it to

what I
have and bring the total to five gallons for lots of flavourful wine?


If you are happy with the quality of the puree (flavour and acid wise)
and you can gain considerable volume from it, why not. Again I'd
stress the balance issue though.

Ben
http://members.tripod.com/~BRotter/100juice.htm



  #4 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 29-12-2003, 04:03 PM
frederick ploegman
 
Posts: n/a
Default raspberry wine advice

Hi Rick

Style. It's all a matter of style. You can do any or all of the things
you mention, it's entirely up to you. Country musts have to be
"created", and how they are formulated depends entirely on the
desired outcome. Want a lite, delicate, dry table wine suitable
for serving with a fish or seafood dinner? You can do that. Want
an intense "Port" style with high alcohol, high sugar, high(er) acid,
bold tannins, and intense flavor? You can do that too. Want
something somewhere in between? Yup, go for it. But it is up to
you to decide !! It's the reason you get so many recipes and so
many differing opinions when you ask such a question. There
simply is no single "best" way.

In a recent post, Jack Keller listed 4 major components of balance.
With country wines, I would add a 5th. Intensity. Not just intensity
of flavor, but intensity of the finished wine as a whole. I don't want
a table wine to overpower the delicate flavors of a well prepared
meal, and I don't want to burn out the palates of my guests *before*
serving such a dinner by serving an overly intense wine. It is *after*
dinner that I might drag out the "knock them dead" Port style
dessert wine.

There is nothing stopping you from breaking down that juice and
using it to make all of these styles in little one gallon batches.

More an "approach" or philosophy to winemaking rather than
a direct answer to your question, but I hope it helps. HTMS


"Rick Vanderwal" wrote in message
...
I'm going to assume that the proper TA would be around .65 for a fruit
wine....

I do think I would like a larger volume of wine....
2 gallons for all those raspberries and all that work will only yield me

10
bottles, and if it turns our really good, I'd rather have 15 or 20 rather
than 10.... I once had some raspberry wine and it was HEAVENLY! Very
rich, balanced, strong raspberry flavour. This past summer I had some
raspberry wine and you could barely taste the raspberry....I definitely
would like to have it closer to the first one I tried and not the

latter....
So I want to keep a strong flavoru concentration...

One thing I also did last night I forgot to write about....I took all the
pulp and seeds that I had extrated using the Victorio Strainer and the

Berry
screen....so, absolutely no seeds in the juice... But I took the seeds

and
leftover pulp, put it in a straining bag, and poured hot water over it,
extracting all the nice red colour and aroma from the remaining pulp.

I'll
only leave it on there one day or so...so I don't pick up any strange
flavours from the seeds. So that might be another 1/2 gallon of
"juice"....not as strong as the extracted juice, but still pretty
flavourful.

Thanks for your ideas. Will still welcome other comments if there's
anything else to add by anyone. Thanks again.

Rick Vanderwal
"Ben Rotter" wrote in message
om...
Rick Vanderwal wrote:

1. Use the two gallons to make two gallons of really rich wine?


Being an advocate of 100% juice wines I'd say go for it! But *as long
as* you can produce a balanced wine from that juice. I would recommend
you check your TA and reduce with carbonate if necessary.

2. Dilute it to make a larger quanitity, but less acidic wine? And

if
so, how much water should I add for dilution? Could I add double the
water, to bring the total to four gallons? or even five? But would

that
water it down too much?


When raspberry wine is diluted, it's often reduced in concentration by
3-5 times. If you are diluting for balance reasons alone, as you
indicate: I'd again suggest you check the TA and dilute only enough to
give a reasonable TA, but no further. There is no point in diluting
beyond that and then having to add acid blend, unless your aim is to
change the acid profile of the wine.

3. Buy a can of Oregon pure seedless raspberry puree and add it to

what I
have and bring the total to five gallons for lots of flavourful wine?


If you are happy with the quality of the puree (flavour and acid wise)
and you can gain considerable volume from it, why not. Again I'd
stress the balance issue though.

Ben
http://members.tripod.com/~BRotter/100juice.htm





  #5 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 30-12-2003, 02:50 PM
jmreiter
 
Posts: n/a
Default raspberry wine advice

Rick,
no, no, no, NO! In my experience, you don't need to pour hot water over
any raspbery must/pulp. This hot/boiling water thing is a pet peeve of
mine. For the most part, it is an ancient holdover from the days before Pot.
Metabisulphite. Cold water would have done just as well. Jack Keller
staunchly maintains that you need hot/boiling water on _some_ fruits to
"set" the color. That may be for a minority of fruits (into which Jack
Keller lumps raspberry). However, I found that this is not necessarily so
for raspberry as I have had successful color retention for up to two years.
Raspberry wine is Heavenly! And I second Ben Rotter's suggestion that
you do a non-diluted raspberry wine. You could add the water which you
poured over the remaining pulp. HOWEVER, I strongly suggest that you check
the TA and the pH of both your juice AND the water you poured over the pulp.
I've heard that a lot of acid can come off the seeds, but I would love to
see if this is true. I'd be especially interested if the is a difference in
pH......
I would stay away from adding any canned puree to a fresh fruit. Have
fun with your wine and let us know what happens.
Joanne

"Rick Vanderwal" wrote in message
...
I'm going to assume that the proper TA would be around .65 for a fruit
wine....

I do think I would like a larger volume of wine....
2 gallons for all those raspberries and all that work will only yield me

10
bottles, and if it turns our really good, I'd rather have 15 or 20 rather
than 10.... I once had some raspberry wine and it was HEAVENLY! Very
rich, balanced, strong raspberry flavour. This past summer I had some
raspberry wine and you could barely taste the raspberry....I definitely
would like to have it closer to the first one I tried and not the

latter....
So I want to keep a strong flavoru concentration...

One thing I also did last night I forgot to write about....I took all the
pulp and seeds that I had extrated using the Victorio Strainer and the

Berry
screen....so, absolutely no seeds in the juice... But I took the seeds

and
leftover pulp, put it in a straining bag, and poured hot water over it,
extracting all the nice red colour and aroma from the remaining pulp.

I'll
only leave it on there one day or so...so I don't pick up any strange
flavours from the seeds. So that might be another 1/2 gallon of
"juice"....not as strong as the extracted juice, but still pretty
flavourful.

Thanks for your ideas. Will still welcome other comments if there's
anything else to add by anyone. Thanks again.

Rick Vanderwal
"Ben Rotter" wrote in message
om...
Rick Vanderwal wrote:

1. Use the two gallons to make two gallons of really rich wine?


Being an advocate of 100% juice wines I'd say go for it! But *as long
as* you can produce a balanced wine from that juice. I would recommend
you check your TA and reduce with carbonate if necessary.

2. Dilute it to make a larger quanitity, but less acidic wine? And

if
so, how much water should I add for dilution? Could I add double the
water, to bring the total to four gallons? or even five? But would

that
water it down too much?


When raspberry wine is diluted, it's often reduced in concentration by
3-5 times. If you are diluting for balance reasons alone, as you
indicate: I'd again suggest you check the TA and dilute only enough to
give a reasonable TA, but no further. There is no point in diluting
beyond that and then having to add acid blend, unless your aim is to
change the acid profile of the wine.

3. Buy a can of Oregon pure seedless raspberry puree and add it to

what I
have and bring the total to five gallons for lots of flavourful wine?


If you are happy with the quality of the puree (flavour and acid wise)
and you can gain considerable volume from it, why not. Again I'd
stress the balance issue though.

Ben
http://members.tripod.com/~BRotter/100juice.htm







  #6 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 30-12-2003, 03:21 PM
Arjay
 
Posts: n/a
Default raspberry wine advice

Rick:

I never made a raspberry wine, although I want to. Have made blackberry
wine though. I didn't have to deal with the tart aspect though. Check the
acid. Sometimes what I do is to add the sugar in water instead of in must.
That is, dissolve the added sugar in water and add that to the must. Some
people add water until the TA is adjusted instead of adding CaCO3. I too
advocate 100% juice wines but have deviated in the past. In the end it is
up to you, but you might want to play it safe and add some water (of course
keeping track of how much) and then next year you will know whether to add
more or less water. For apple and peach I never add water.

Good luck,
Arjay

"Rick Vanderwal" wrote in
:

Tonight I just pressed two gallons of pure raspberry juice from the 18
or so pounds I had frozen from my bushes this summer.

I've read a number of recipes...and I guess I'd like some advice as to
what to do....

1. Use the two gallons to make two gallons of really rich wine?
2. Dilute it to make a larger quanitity, but less acidic wine? And

  #7 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 30-12-2003, 11:33 PM
frederick ploegman
 
Posts: n/a
Default raspberry wine advice

Hi Joanne

With all due respect, I would like to offer some other points of
consideration when discussing the use of heat in winemaking.
About the only way to avoid having heat used at some point in
the process, is to make the wine from fresh fruit or "flash frozen"
fruit.

Consider: Anything that is canned uses heat during the process
for pasteurization, even though the label may not say so.
Consider: Many frozen things either say "pasteurized" on the label
or are in the form of concentrates.
Consider: The normal commercial process used to make concentrates
also uses heat. So anything made from concentrate, or anything
which says on the label that it has been "reconstituted from
concentrate", has had heat used on it at some point during processing.
Consider: Virtually all kits are made with juices that have been
pasteurized, condensed, or reconstituted from concentrate, which
means heat was used. They also have the tartaric acid removed
which places them in the "non-tartaric" class of wines ( but that
is another subject)
Consider: Commercial jams and jellies use heat during the process.

The list goes on, but the bottom line is that anyone that has ever
made wine from any of these things has been making (so called)
"hot process" wines. There is nothing *wrong* with such wines,
but yes, they are different from "fresh fruit" (cold process) wines,
and folks should be aware of the differences. I make both hot
and cold process wines using the same fruit, and each has it's
following among my friends.
HTMS (?) HTH


"jmreiter" wrote in message
...
Rick,
no, no, no, NO! In my experience, you don't need to pour hot water over
any raspbery must/pulp. This hot/boiling water thing is a pet peeve of
mine. For the most part, it is an ancient holdover from the days before

Pot.
Metabisulphite. Cold water would have done just as well. Jack Keller
staunchly maintains that you need hot/boiling water on _some_ fruits to
"set" the color. That may be for a minority of fruits (into which Jack
Keller lumps raspberry). However, I found that this is not necessarily so
for raspberry as I have had successful color retention for up to two

years.
Raspberry wine is Heavenly! And I second Ben Rotter's suggestion that
you do a non-diluted raspberry wine. You could add the water which you
poured over the remaining pulp. HOWEVER, I strongly suggest that you check
the TA and the pH of both your juice AND the water you poured over the

pulp.
I've heard that a lot of acid can come off the seeds, but I would love to
see if this is true. I'd be especially interested if the is a difference

in
pH......
I would stay away from adding any canned puree to a fresh fruit. Have
fun with your wine and let us know what happens.
Joanne

"Rick Vanderwal" wrote in message
...
I'm going to assume that the proper TA would be around .65 for a fruit
wine....

I do think I would like a larger volume of wine....
2 gallons for all those raspberries and all that work will only yield me

10
bottles, and if it turns our really good, I'd rather have 15 or 20

rather
than 10.... I once had some raspberry wine and it was HEAVENLY!

Very
rich, balanced, strong raspberry flavour. This past summer I had some
raspberry wine and you could barely taste the raspberry....I definitely
would like to have it closer to the first one I tried and not the

latter....
So I want to keep a strong flavoru concentration...

One thing I also did last night I forgot to write about....I took all

the
pulp and seeds that I had extrated using the Victorio Strainer and the

Berry
screen....so, absolutely no seeds in the juice... But I took the seeds

and
leftover pulp, put it in a straining bag, and poured hot water over it,
extracting all the nice red colour and aroma from the remaining pulp.

I'll
only leave it on there one day or so...so I don't pick up any strange
flavours from the seeds. So that might be another 1/2 gallon of
"juice"....not as strong as the extracted juice, but still pretty
flavourful.

Thanks for your ideas. Will still welcome other comments if there's
anything else to add by anyone. Thanks again.

Rick Vanderwal
"Ben Rotter" wrote in message
om...
Rick Vanderwal wrote:

1. Use the two gallons to make two gallons of really rich wine?

Being an advocate of 100% juice wines I'd say go for it! But *as long
as* you can produce a balanced wine from that juice. I would recommend
you check your TA and reduce with carbonate if necessary.

2. Dilute it to make a larger quanitity, but less acidic wine?

And
if
so, how much water should I add for dilution? Could I add double

the
water, to bring the total to four gallons? or even five? But would

that
water it down too much?

When raspberry wine is diluted, it's often reduced in concentration by
3-5 times. If you are diluting for balance reasons alone, as you
indicate: I'd again suggest you check the TA and dilute only enough to
give a reasonable TA, but no further. There is no point in diluting
beyond that and then having to add acid blend, unless your aim is to
change the acid profile of the wine.

3. Buy a can of Oregon pure seedless raspberry puree and add it

to
what I
have and bring the total to five gallons for lots of flavourful

wine?

If you are happy with the quality of the puree (flavour and acid wise)
and you can gain considerable volume from it, why not. Again I'd
stress the balance issue though.

Ben
http://members.tripod.com/~BRotter/100juice.htm







  #8 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 31-12-2003, 12:52 PM
Ben Rotter
 
Posts: n/a
Default raspberry wine advice

Frederick,

Aside from the puree Rick suggested he might use, we are talking about
cold processed fruit. Joanne is saying that when using fresh/flash
frozen fruit it isn't *neccessary* to heat the fruit. That's perfectly
true, and like her, I agree there is no need to heat raspberry must to
set the colour.

It's true that many potential sources of fruit for winemaking have had
some kind of treatment. There is a general opinion, however, that
these are generally inferior to the fresh version (of the same
original fruit quality). You could argue they are "just different",
but would you really prefer to drink reconstituted orange juice over
fresh orange juice? I think the answer in most cases would be no.

Of course, in the end it's up to the individual.

Ben
  #9 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 31-12-2003, 05:50 PM
frederick ploegman
 
Posts: n/a
Default raspberry wine advice

Hi Ben

Comments interspersed........

"Ben Rotter" wrote in message
m...
Frederick,

Aside from the puree Rick suggested he might use, we are talking about
cold processed fruit. Joanne is saying that when using fresh/flash
frozen fruit it isn't *neccessary* to heat the fruit.


Oh, I agree absolutely that is isn't "necessary" to heat the fruit, but
it isn't necessarily *bad* to do it that way either.

That's perfectly
true, and like her, I agree there is no need to heat raspberry must to
set the colour.


I know little about the use of heat to "set" colors so I can't really
comment on this.


It's true that many potential sources of fruit for winemaking have had
some kind of treatment. There is a general opinion, however, that
these are generally inferior to the fresh version (of the same
original fruit quality).


But don't you see, it is with this "general opinion" that I so strongly
disagree. Each wine has to stand on it's own merit. Period. The
fact that the resulting wines may be different has little to do with
whether an individual will choose one over the other as his "preferred"
style.

You could argue they are "just different",


snip

Yes, I *do* argue that they are "just different". To support this, I
would point to Jack Keller's site. Jack lists the wines that have won
prizes in various competitions. Even a brief survey of these wines
and their recipes will show that some of them were "hot process",
others were "cold process", and yet others were made from bases
that had heat used at some point during the processing of the base
materials. It must surely be assumed that these wines were in
competition with at least some "cold process" wines, and yet were
judged better that the others. IOW - they were judged on their
merit rather than the "process" or materials from which they were
made.

snip

Of course, in the end it's up to the individual.


That's exactly my point.
HTMS

PS - I sincerely hope that my comments are accepted in the spirit
with which they are offered. Namely, that I am only trying to be
helpful here by presenting an alternative point of view.

Best regards and happy new year to everyone !!

Frederick


Ben



  #10 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 31-12-2003, 09:47 PM
Rick Vanderwal
 
Posts: n/a
Default raspberry wine advice

thanks everyone for your comments and your input.
I really appreciate them all!
I wish you all a very happy new year!

Well, I went back and forth, back and forth....
pure juice wine, or dilute, pure, dilute, pure, dilute....

I finally decided....I wanted more of the volume this year...
And see how it turns out.
Then, next year, I can do it differently, and just go with the pure juice...
I guess that's the beauty of it, as one of you said....
there's no perfect recipe, you can create your own, and try it in different
ways,

So, I took the pure juice, and also the water in which the seeds and
leftover pulp had sat in for two days,
and ended up with about 3 gallons of juice.
I added one more gallon, to get four, and added sugar to get a reading of
1.090....
Added yeast nutrient, energizer, a bit of tannin, and....
now the yeast.

So, now I wait...and see how it all goes.

Thanks again.

Rick



"Rick Vanderwal" wrote in message
...
Tonight I just pressed two gallons of pure raspberry juice from the 18 or

so
pounds I had frozen from my bushes this summer.

I've read a number of recipes...and I guess I'd like some advice as to

what
to do....

1. Use the two gallons to make two gallons of really rich wine?
2. Dilute it to make a larger quanitity, but less acidic wine? And if
so, how much water should I add for dilution? Could I add double the
water, to bring the total to four gallons? or even five? But would that
water it down too much?
3. Buy a can of Oregon pure seedless raspberry puree and add it to what

I
have and bring the total to five gallons for lots of flavourful wine?

I have the juice sitting in the garage in a closed bucket, so i'd love to
act on it quickly. The temperature is 40 degrees so it should hold for a
day or two. Any advice would be greatly appreciated! Thanks! You guys
and gals are always a lot of help!!!

Sincerely, Rick Vanderwal
Fremont, Michigan







  #11 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 31-12-2003, 11:59 PM
jmreiter
 
Posts: n/a
Default raspberry wine advice

Hi Fred,
I like your point. And you do make another very good case, not to mix
fresh fruit with canned/processed fruit. I agree, there is nothing _wrong_
with using a canned puree to make wine.
Happy Winemaking,
Joanne
"frederick ploegman" wrote in message
...
Hi Joanne

With all due respect, I would like to offer some other points of
consideration when discussing the use of heat in winemaking.
About the only way to avoid having heat used at some point in
the process, is to make the wine from fresh fruit or "flash frozen"
fruit.

Consider: Anything that is canned uses heat during the process
for pasteurization, even though the label may not say so.
Consider: Many frozen things either say "pasteurized" on the label
or are in the form of concentrates.
Consider: The normal commercial process used to make concentrates
also uses heat. So anything made from concentrate, or anything
which says on the label that it has been "reconstituted from
concentrate", has had heat used on it at some point during processing.
Consider: Virtually all kits are made with juices that have been
pasteurized, condensed, or reconstituted from concentrate, which
means heat was used. They also have the tartaric acid removed
which places them in the "non-tartaric" class of wines ( but that
is another subject)
Consider: Commercial jams and jellies use heat during the process.

The list goes on, but the bottom line is that anyone that has ever
made wine from any of these things has been making (so called)
"hot process" wines. There is nothing *wrong* with such wines,
but yes, they are different from "fresh fruit" (cold process) wines,
and folks should be aware of the differences. I make both hot
and cold process wines using the same fruit, and each has it's
following among my friends.
HTMS (?) HTH


"jmreiter" wrote in message
...
Rick,
no, no, no, NO! In my experience, you don't need to pour hot water

over
any raspbery must/pulp. This hot/boiling water thing is a pet peeve of
mine. For the most part, it is an ancient holdover from the days before

Pot.
Metabisulphite. Cold water would have done just as well. Jack Keller
staunchly maintains that you need hot/boiling water on _some_ fruits to
"set" the color. That may be for a minority of fruits (into which Jack
Keller lumps raspberry). However, I found that this is not necessarily

so
for raspberry as I have had successful color retention for up to two

years.
Raspberry wine is Heavenly! And I second Ben Rotter's suggestion

that
you do a non-diluted raspberry wine. You could add the water which you
poured over the remaining pulp. HOWEVER, I strongly suggest that you

check
the TA and the pH of both your juice AND the water you poured over the

pulp.
I've heard that a lot of acid can come off the seeds, but I would love

to
see if this is true. I'd be especially interested if the is a difference

in
pH......
I would stay away from adding any canned puree to a fresh fruit.

Have
fun with your wine and let us know what happens.
Joanne

"Rick Vanderwal" wrote in message
...
I'm going to assume that the proper TA would be around .65 for a fruit
wine....

I do think I would like a larger volume of wine....
2 gallons for all those raspberries and all that work will only yield

me
10
bottles, and if it turns our really good, I'd rather have 15 or 20

rather
than 10.... I once had some raspberry wine and it was HEAVENLY!

Very
rich, balanced, strong raspberry flavour. This past summer I had some
raspberry wine and you could barely taste the raspberry....I

definitely
would like to have it closer to the first one I tried and not the

latter....
So I want to keep a strong flavoru concentration...

One thing I also did last night I forgot to write about....I took all

the
pulp and seeds that I had extrated using the Victorio Strainer and the

Berry
screen....so, absolutely no seeds in the juice... But I took the

seeds
and
leftover pulp, put it in a straining bag, and poured hot water over

it,
extracting all the nice red colour and aroma from the remaining pulp.

I'll
only leave it on there one day or so...so I don't pick up any strange
flavours from the seeds. So that might be another 1/2 gallon of
"juice"....not as strong as the extracted juice, but still pretty
flavourful.

Thanks for your ideas. Will still welcome other comments if there's
anything else to add by anyone. Thanks again.

Rick Vanderwal
"Ben Rotter" wrote in message
om...
Rick Vanderwal wrote:

1. Use the two gallons to make two gallons of really rich wine?

Being an advocate of 100% juice wines I'd say go for it! But *as

long
as* you can produce a balanced wine from that juice. I would

recommend
you check your TA and reduce with carbonate if necessary.

2. Dilute it to make a larger quanitity, but less acidic wine?

And
if
so, how much water should I add for dilution? Could I add double

the
water, to bring the total to four gallons? or even five? But

would
that
water it down too much?

When raspberry wine is diluted, it's often reduced in concentration

by
3-5 times. If you are diluting for balance reasons alone, as you
indicate: I'd again suggest you check the TA and dilute only enough

to
give a reasonable TA, but no further. There is no point in diluting
beyond that and then having to add acid blend, unless your aim is to
change the acid profile of the wine.

3. Buy a can of Oregon pure seedless raspberry puree and add it

to
what I
have and bring the total to five gallons for lots of flavourful

wine?

If you are happy with the quality of the puree (flavour and acid

wise)
and you can gain considerable volume from it, why not. Again I'd
stress the balance issue though.

Ben
http://members.tripod.com/~BRotter/100juice.htm








  #12 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 01-01-2004, 12:04 AM
jmreiter
 
Posts: n/a
Default raspberry wine advice

What is the pH?????

Rick,
let me give you one very serious piece of advice on raspberry wine; you
ned to know the pH! Tartness does not necessarily come fom the TA of the
fruit or the seeds. It's the pH of the fruit that accounts for the "pucker
factor" of raspberry wine. If you don't have one, or the wife didn't buy you
one for Christmas, get thyself a pH meeter and take a reading ASAP!!!!! You
may have to correct for the pH so your lips don't pucker all the way to the
back of your head.
Joanne

"Rick Vanderwal" wrote in message
...
thanks everyone for your comments and your input.
I really appreciate them all!
I wish you all a very happy new year!

Well, I went back and forth, back and forth....
pure juice wine, or dilute, pure, dilute, pure, dilute....

I finally decided....I wanted more of the volume this year...
And see how it turns out.
Then, next year, I can do it differently, and just go with the pure

juice...
I guess that's the beauty of it, as one of you said....
there's no perfect recipe, you can create your own, and try it in

different
ways,

So, I took the pure juice, and also the water in which the seeds and
leftover pulp had sat in for two days,
and ended up with about 3 gallons of juice.
I added one more gallon, to get four, and added sugar to get a reading of
1.090....
Added yeast nutrient, energizer, a bit of tannin, and....
now the yeast.

So, now I wait...and see how it all goes.

Thanks again.

Rick



"Rick Vanderwal" wrote in message
...
Tonight I just pressed two gallons of pure raspberry juice from the 18

or
so
pounds I had frozen from my bushes this summer.

I've read a number of recipes...and I guess I'd like some advice as to

what
to do....

1. Use the two gallons to make two gallons of really rich wine?
2. Dilute it to make a larger quanitity, but less acidic wine? And

if
so, how much water should I add for dilution? Could I add double the
water, to bring the total to four gallons? or even five? But would

that
water it down too much?
3. Buy a can of Oregon pure seedless raspberry puree and add it to

what
I
have and bring the total to five gallons for lots of flavourful wine?

I have the juice sitting in the garage in a closed bucket, so i'd love

to
act on it quickly. The temperature is 40 degrees so it should hold for

a
day or two. Any advice would be greatly appreciated! Thanks! You

guys
and gals are always a lot of help!!!

Sincerely, Rick Vanderwal
Fremont, Michigan







  #13 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 01-01-2004, 07:38 AM
Rick Vanderwal
 
Posts: n/a
Default raspberry wine advice

that I don't know...
I did check acid level....it's about 7.5
so I'll probably have to get some calcium carbonate...
but ph? I haven't done that before.
a ph meter? next time I go to my wine store, I'll have to look for one.
Unfortunately, I live an hour away from it.

what does adjusting ph involve?
Rick


"jmreiter" wrote in message
...
What is the pH?????

Rick,
let me give you one very serious piece of advice on raspberry wine; you
ned to know the pH! Tartness does not necessarily come fom the TA of the
fruit or the seeds. It's the pH of the fruit that accounts for the "pucker
factor" of raspberry wine. If you don't have one, or the wife didn't buy

you
one for Christmas, get thyself a pH meeter and take a reading ASAP!!!!!

You
may have to correct for the pH so your lips don't pucker all the way to

the
back of your head.
Joanne

"Rick Vanderwal" wrote in message
...
thanks everyone for your comments and your input.
I really appreciate them all!
I wish you all a very happy new year!

Well, I went back and forth, back and forth....
pure juice wine, or dilute, pure, dilute, pure, dilute....

I finally decided....I wanted more of the volume this year...
And see how it turns out.
Then, next year, I can do it differently, and just go with the pure

juice...
I guess that's the beauty of it, as one of you said....
there's no perfect recipe, you can create your own, and try it in

different
ways,

So, I took the pure juice, and also the water in which the seeds and
leftover pulp had sat in for two days,
and ended up with about 3 gallons of juice.
I added one more gallon, to get four, and added sugar to get a reading

of
1.090....
Added yeast nutrient, energizer, a bit of tannin, and....
now the yeast.

So, now I wait...and see how it all goes.

Thanks again.

Rick



"Rick Vanderwal" wrote in message
...
Tonight I just pressed two gallons of pure raspberry juice from the 18

or
so
pounds I had frozen from my bushes this summer.

I've read a number of recipes...and I guess I'd like some advice as to

what
to do....

1. Use the two gallons to make two gallons of really rich wine?
2. Dilute it to make a larger quanitity, but less acidic wine? And

if
so, how much water should I add for dilution? Could I add double the
water, to bring the total to four gallons? or even five? But would

that
water it down too much?
3. Buy a can of Oregon pure seedless raspberry puree and add it to

what
I
have and bring the total to five gallons for lots of flavourful wine?

I have the juice sitting in the garage in a closed bucket, so i'd love

to
act on it quickly. The temperature is 40 degrees so it should hold

for
a
day or two. Any advice would be greatly appreciated! Thanks! You

guys
and gals are always a lot of help!!!

Sincerely, Rick Vanderwal
Fremont, Michigan









  #14 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 01-01-2004, 06:14 PM
Rick Vanderwal
 
Posts: n/a
Default raspberry wine advice

p.s. . . .
i've been doing home winemaking for about 2-3 years now...
and still feel like such a newbie!
normally, have just been following recipes, and going by taste,
adjustements, etc..., but haven't been so technical...yet.
So things like meausring acid and ph are relatively new to me.

Rick



  #15 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 02-01-2004, 06:38 PM
Rick Vanderwal
 
Posts: n/a
Default raspberry wine advice

ok, I got some ph strips....and I've read that they're not the most accurate
in winemaking...but it's all i have right now.

Under the faucet, the ph strips immediately turn green, showing tapwater to
have a higher ph than my raspberry must, which looks like it's below 3.0...
I'm going to see if I can drum up a ph meter somewhere to get a more
accurate reading. At this stage, and please let me know if I'm right, the
best course of action is probably to let it ferment, then to cold stabilize
to see if any tartaric crystals form, thus reducing acid and raising ph.
Else I could use potassium carbonate...and try to reduce the acid as well,
which I think is higher than I first thought...

During fermentation is probably not the best time to do it, right?

Anyway, thanks again for your earlier comments, interesting discussion.

Rick Vanderwal
Fremont, MI




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