Tea (rec.drink.tea) Discussion relating to tea, the world's second most consumed beverage (after water), made by infusing or boiling the leaves of the tea plant (C. sinensis or close relatives) in water.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 18-11-2006, 03:56 PM posted to rec.food.drink.tea
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 1,231
Default Unassuming tea blossom pitcher

My local tea shoppe was having a sell on some promotional items from
the various big tea sites. I walked in and there was some tea blossoms
brewing in a couple of these pitchers. It is 420ml/14oz. The pitcher
is thick glass and magnifies the blossom 2x which impressed me the
most. The body is bowed so the blossom won't fall out even if held
vertical when pouring out the last drop. The handle never gets hot.
It has a good lip so you won't spill a drop no matter how full. The
box doesn't say anything about blossoms just to be used with paper
filters. If you look there is a filter basket that goes with it which
I also got. I use the filter basket top as a lid which isn't
absolutely necessary. I got an Upton electric 1 liter SS detachable
kettle with variable thermostat for about half the price. The only
thing of note the kettle needs to be half full for the thermostat to
work in all ranges. It's 1400 watts and will make water holy real
fast.

http://tinyurl.com/y3lmts

Jim


  #2 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 20-11-2006, 11:48 AM posted to rec.food.drink.tea
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 111
Default Unassuming tea blossom pitcher

That's a very pretty jug. I recently bought two similar ones from ITC
which are a little more squat:

http://tinyurl.com/arxa4

There's something satisfying about thick glass. Conversely, there's
something unsatisfying about thin glass. I recently bought three of
these from Dragon Tea House:

http://tinyurl.com/vqj7l

The service from this vendor is excellent (he very kindly offered to
resend another saucer that was cracked in transit), but the gaiwans are
exceptionally thin glass. This means that I can no longer pour with
one hand: the lid becomes so hot when pouring that one cannot hold the
lid on with just a thumb. I have to use the other hand to gingerly
hold the lid at its edges, which is a pity.

Does anyone have a recommendation for a good thick-glass gaiwan? The
thicker and heavier, the better.


Toodlepip,

Hobbes

  #3 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 20-11-2006, 02:44 PM posted to rec.food.drink.tea
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 1,231
Default Unassuming tea blossom pitcher

Have you tried a tea blossom in yours? My glassware before this one
was too big. Mine probably gives me 8 oz of tea with the blossom
displacement. I don't top it off. Mine also makes needles look sexy.
I've tried bushy stem teas also with good visual results. I wonder if
these are generic pitchers with thick magnifying glass? I'll check out
a gourmet kitchen store soon. I second Gordon at DTH. I'll have to
get some glass gaiwans on the next order. My local tea shoppe is
moving into a brand new building nearby. The owner says he needs more
tables, more kitchen, more shelving, more storage, more counter, more
of everything. January is his fourth year in business.

Jim

HobbesOxon wrote:
That's a very pretty jug. I recently bought two similar ones from ITC
which are a little more squat:

http://tinyurl.com/arxa4

There's something satisfying about thick glass. Conversely, there's
something unsatisfying about thin glass. I recently bought three of
these from Dragon Tea House:

http://tinyurl.com/vqj7l

The service from this vendor is excellent (he very kindly offered to
resend another saucer that was cracked in transit), but the gaiwans are
exceptionally thin glass. This means that I can no longer pour with
one hand: the lid becomes so hot when pouring that one cannot hold the
lid on with just a thumb. I have to use the other hand to gingerly
hold the lid at its edges, which is a pity.

Does anyone have a recommendation for a good thick-glass gaiwan? The
thicker and heavier, the better.


Toodlepip,

Hobbes


  #4 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 20-11-2006, 03:25 PM posted to rec.food.drink.tea
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 997
Default Unassuming tea blossom pitcher

[...]
Does anyone have a recommendation for a good thick-glass gaiwan? The
thicker and heavier, the better.


I *think* this is the same sturdy gaiwan that serves me reliably at work:

http://www.tenren.com/gljacupg.html

I bought mine at a bricks-and-mortar Ten Ren in New York.

/Lew
---
Lew Perin /
http://www.panix.com/~perin/babelcarp.html
recently updated: Cha Qi
  #5 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 20-11-2006, 03:58 PM posted to rec.food.drink.tea
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 509
Default Unassuming tea blossom pitcher

Lewis 11/20/06

[...]
Does anyone have a recommendation for a good thick-glass gaiwan? The
thicker and heavier, the better.


I *think* this is the same sturdy gaiwan that serves me reliably at work:

http://www.tenren.com/gljacupg.html

I bought mine at a bricks-and-mortar Ten Ren in New York.


It might be known as the "jasmine cup," but I think I can say with fair
certainty that Lew's still awaits its first jasmine steep. I hope said cup
is not holding its glassy breath.
Michael



  #6 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 20-11-2006, 04:47 PM posted to rec.food.drink.tea
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 226
Default Unassuming tea blossom pitcher


Michael Plant wrote:

It might be known as the "jasmine cup," but I think I can say with fair
certainty that Lew's still awaits its first jasmine steep. I hope said cup
is not holding its glassy breath.
Michael


It seems like the one that Hobbes got and the one that Lew got are a
bit different in proportions -- the one Lew got has more space between
the rim and where the lid rests, whereas the one Hobbes got has almost
no space at all.

It usually becomes pretty tempting to pour to where the lid is..... or
close, anyway, and once you place the lid, the water oozes up a little,
which means it will be right up to the rim in Hobbes' case.... and
making the rim extremely hot.

Try pouring less . It might work better and not burn your fingers.

MarshalN
http://www.xanga.com/MarshalN

  #7 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 20-11-2006, 05:41 PM posted to rec.food.drink.tea
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 997
Default Unassuming tea blossom pitcher

Michael Plant writes:

Lewis 11/20/06

[...]
Does anyone have a recommendation for a good thick-glass gaiwan? The
thicker and heavier, the better.


I *think* this is the same sturdy gaiwan that serves me reliably at work:

http://www.tenren.com/gljacupg.html

I bought mine at a bricks-and-mortar Ten Ren in New York.


It might be known as the "jasmine cup," but I think I can say with
fair certainty that Lew's still awaits its first jasmine steep. I
hope said cup is not holding its glassy breath.


When they ask me where have all the flowers gone, I'll have an
ironclad alibi.

/Lew
---
Lew Perin /
http://www.panix.com/~perin/babelcarp.html
  #8 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 21-11-2006, 11:59 AM posted to rec.food.drink.tea
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 509
Default On Gaiwans [was:Unassuming tea blossom pitcher]

11/20/06



Michael Plant wrote:

It might be known as the "jasmine cup," but I think I can say with fair
certainty that Lew's still awaits its first jasmine steep. I hope said cup
is not holding its glassy breath.
Michael


It seems like the one that Hobbes got and the one that Lew got are a
bit different in proportions -- the one Lew got has more space between
the rim and where the lid rests, whereas the one Hobbes got has almost
no space at all.

It usually becomes pretty tempting to pour to where the lid is..... or
close, anyway, and once you place the lid, the water oozes up a little,
which means it will be right up to the rim in Hobbes' case.... and
making the rim extremely hot.

Try pouring less . It might work better and not burn your fingers.



I think that's a crucial point. For a comfortable pour, I
believe you would need the lid to fit somewhat within
the rim of the cup; otherwise, as you suggest, it's
burning finger time again, and a broken lid moment.
Gaiwan discussions around here lately have centered
on whether the proper grasp is at the rim with index
finger planted firmly over or in the lid knob, or alternately
with some number of fingers and/or thumb grasping the
base of the cup while the others control the rim and the
lid. I go for the former, as you can probably tell.

For what it's worth, Lew's everyday gaiwan is perhaps
five or six ounces capacity, while mine is no more than
two ounces. I find this small size efficacious on several
fronts. First, I can use less tea, drink less of each kind
and move through three types throughout the day without
guilt. I find the size easy to handle. I seem to remember
that Lew's glass gaiwan has nice thin walls, while most
I've seen are rather thick walled and, to me, clumsy.

But, in the end, I'm convinced that God's plan for us
does not include glass gaiwans. Porcelain gaiwans are
pure and worthy.

Michael

  #9 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 21-11-2006, 12:34 PM posted to rec.food.drink.tea
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 21
Default On Gaiwans [was:Unassuming tea blossom pitcher]

there are several companies that have beutiful, inexpensive teaware
www.republicoftea.com
www.harney.com
www.shanshuiteas.com-by far they have the most choices of teaware and
utensils

joanne r.


Michael Plant wrote:
11/20/06



Michael Plant wrote:

It might be known as the "jasmine cup," but I think I can say with fair
certainty that Lew's still awaits its first jasmine steep. I hope said cup
is not holding its glassy breath.
Michael


It seems like the one that Hobbes got and the one that Lew got are a
bit different in proportions -- the one Lew got has more space between
the rim and where the lid rests, whereas the one Hobbes got has almost
no space at all.

It usually becomes pretty tempting to pour to where the lid is..... or
close, anyway, and once you place the lid, the water oozes up a little,
which means it will be right up to the rim in Hobbes' case.... and
making the rim extremely hot.

Try pouring less . It might work better and not burn your fingers.



I think that's a crucial point. For a comfortable pour, I
believe you would need the lid to fit somewhat within
the rim of the cup; otherwise, as you suggest, it's
burning finger time again, and a broken lid moment.
Gaiwan discussions around here lately have centered
on whether the proper grasp is at the rim with index
finger planted firmly over or in the lid knob, or alternately
with some number of fingers and/or thumb grasping the
base of the cup while the others control the rim and the
lid. I go for the former, as you can probably tell.

For what it's worth, Lew's everyday gaiwan is perhaps
five or six ounces capacity, while mine is no more than
two ounces. I find this small size efficacious on several
fronts. First, I can use less tea, drink less of each kind
and move through three types throughout the day without
guilt. I find the size easy to handle. I seem to remember
that Lew's glass gaiwan has nice thin walls, while most
I've seen are rather thick walled and, to me, clumsy.

But, in the end, I'm convinced that God's plan for us
does not include glass gaiwans. Porcelain gaiwans are
pure and worthy.

Michael


  #10 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 21-11-2006, 01:03 PM posted to rec.food.drink.tea
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 509
Default On Gaiwans [was:Unassuming tea blossom pitcher]

there are several companies that have beutiful, inexpensive teaware
www.republicoftea.com
www.harney.com
www.shanshuiteas.com-by far they have the most choices of teaware and
utensils

joanne r.


While ShanShui does have a wide variety, you need to be careful because many
of the cups and associated wares are clunky and thick walled. This is not
bad, but if you expect thin porcelain, you might be disappointed. The
pictured glass gaiwan is of the lid-hugs-the-rim type that MarshalN wanred
about. I have made purchases from ShanShui, and I am much plesaed.

I have to recommend against harney and rot on principle, as they are massive
companies, and American based. I looked over the Harney site and unearthed
but one lonely gaiwan and not a single tasting or aroma cup or sharing
pitcher. Clearly Harney is out of the loop. My rot search revealed nothing,
although I might have missed it.

Instead I recommend Jing Tea Shop because their porcelain teawares are thin
walled, well formed, well made, and reasonably priced, although I wouldn't
tell them that. (Woops!). Being in Guang Zhou, they can usually do better
than American based companies. It is my humble opinion that they Sebastian
and Jing have good taste. They've been rather quiet lately, eh?

Michael




  #11 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 21-11-2006, 02:55 PM posted to rec.food.drink.tea
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 642
Default On Gaiwans [was:Unassuming tea blossom pitcher]

Michael Plant wrote:

Instead I recommend Jing Tea Shop because their porcelain teawares are thin
walled, well formed, well made, and reasonably priced, although I wouldn't
tell them that. (Woops!). Being in Guang Zhou, they can usually do better
than American based companies. It is my humble opinion that they Sebastian
and Jing have good taste. They've been rather quiet lately, eh?


I break thinwalled porcelain... my office is something of a mess and I have
a tendency to put my teacup down on top of heavy machinery.

I really love the Chatsworth "Vitrified Hotelware" materials... they look
like thin china, and they have the right weight to them, but you can throw
them against the wall and they don't chip.

I'd _love_ to have a gaiwan made of that stuff.
--scott


--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
  #12 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 21-11-2006, 03:06 PM posted to rec.food.drink.tea
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 509
Default On Gaiwans [was:Unassuming tea blossom pitcher]

Scott /21/06

Michael Plant wrote:

Instead I recommend Jing Tea Shop because their porcelain teawares are thin
walled, well formed, well made, and reasonably priced, although I wouldn't
tell them that. (Woops!). Being in Guang Zhou, they can usually do better
than American based companies. It is my humble opinion that they Sebastian
and Jing have good taste. They've been rather quiet lately, eh?


I break thinwalled porcelain... my office is something of a mess and I have
a tendency to put my teacup down on top of heavy machinery.

I really love the Chatsworth "Vitrified Hotelware" materials... they look
like thin china, and they have the right weight to them, but you can throw
them against the wall and they don't chip.

I'd _love_ to have a gaiwan made of that stuff.


I think I know the material you mention, but I don't remember it as being
quite as thin as thin porcelain. I notice that Jing's cobalt blue painted
gaiwans come in "lower" and "higher" qualities, the former being thinner
and drawn with a more spontaneous hand, so the drawing retain a painterly
quality. The higher priced ones are heavier, although not heavy, and the
paintings are more even in shade and deeper in tone. I much prefer the
former. I have both in my collections.

Tell me more about the vitrified hotelware.

Michael

  #13 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 21-11-2006, 03:23 PM posted to rec.food.drink.tea
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 997
Default On Gaiwans [was:Unassuming tea blossom pitcher]

Michael Plant writes:

[...]

For what it's worth, Lew's everyday gaiwan is perhaps five or six
ounces capacity, while mine is no more than two ounces. I find this
small size efficacious on several fronts. First, I can use less tea,
drink less of each kind and move through three types throughout the
day without guilt. I find the size easy to handle. I seem to
remember that Lew's glass gaiwan has nice thin walls, while most
I've seen are rather thick walled and, to me, clumsy.


I would call it medium thickness, actually: nowhere near as thin as
some porcelain.

/Lew
---
Lew Perin /
http://www.panix.com/~perin/babelcarp.html
recent addition: zhen pin
  #14 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 21-11-2006, 04:01 PM posted to rec.food.drink.tea
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 642
Default On Gaiwans [was:Unassuming tea blossom pitcher]

Michael Plant wrote:

I think I know the material you mention, but I don't remember it as being
quite as thin as thin porcelain. I notice that Jing's cobalt blue painted
gaiwans come in "lower" and "higher" qualities, the former being thinner
and drawn with a more spontaneous hand, so the drawing retain a painterly
quality. The higher priced ones are heavier, although not heavy, and the
paintings are more even in shade and deeper in tone. I much prefer the
former. I have both in my collections.


It is not as thin as the best thin porcelain, but it is still pretty thin.
You could pass it off as mid-grade porcelain and get away with it, I think.

Tell me more about the vitrified hotelware.


You now know about all I do. It's some kind of super-high-firing glasslike
stuff, even higher firing than porcelain. Whatever it is, I like it.
--scott
--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
  #15 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 21-11-2006, 05:22 PM posted to rec.food.drink.tea
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 74
Default Unassuming tea blossom pitcher

I have one from ITC that's great. However it's kind of large (7 oz or
so). YSLLC has one that Scott recommends.


HobbesOxon wrote:

Does anyone have a recommendation for a good thick-glass gaiwan? The
thicker and heavier, the better.


Toodlepip,

Hobbes




Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Flavor Infusion Pitcher Alan Holbrook[_5_] General Cooking 21 19-03-2013 05:26 PM
HELP: Pitcher-style water filtration? Andy[_15_] Cooking Equipment 8 05-07-2009 10:54 PM
The pitcher had water in... Dan Krueger Barbecue 4 05-10-2006 04:05 AM
Banana blossom James Silverton Asian Cooking 4 02-10-2006 06:48 PM
?PITCHER SHAPE FOR MILK FROTHING Raicu Coffee 0 21-06-2004 04:31 AM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 03:44 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2022, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2022 FoodBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about Food and drink"

 

Copyright © 2017