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Old 01-07-2009, 02:28 PM posted to rec.food.equipment
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Default HELP: Pitcher-style water filtration?

Not seeking a brand, just a few questions.

When it's done filtering, do you pull off the top filtration apparatus and
refrigerate the pitcher?

What maintenance/care is required when not in use? Bacteria prevention
treatment?

Is filtering a few pitchers at a time into a separate pitcher a better
practice?

How long a process is realistically? I don't want to babysit the water
filter all day long.

What's an average pitcher capacity? I've seen "up to" 1/3 gallon by Brita.

I imagine the filters do the job as advertised. Is it actually more cost
effective than gallon jug cost?

I'm tired of paying $1.79 a gallon at the supermarket is why I ask.That and
it's a "green" step in the right direction.

Any thoughts?

Andy
--
"But Manny, Ellie's fun and you're no fun! She completes you!
--Sid the Sloth, "Ice Age: The Meltdown"

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Old 01-07-2009, 08:51 PM posted to rec.food.equipment
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Default Pitcher-style water filtration?


"Andy" wrote in message

I'm tired of paying $1.79 a gallon at the supermarket is why I ask.That
and
it's a "green" step in the right direction.

Any thoughts?


If you own the house, put a filter in the kitchen cold water line. You may
also want to consider one of the ones that attaches to the spout.


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Old 02-07-2009, 01:05 PM posted to rec.food.equipment
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Default HELP: Pitcher-style water filtration?

Andy wrote:


Any thoughts?


Do you have a reason to believe that you need to filter your water?

Matthew

--
"You give me a waterboard, Dick Cheney and one hour, and I'll have him
confess to the Sharon Tate murders." -- Jesse Ventura
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Old 03-07-2009, 08:46 PM posted to rec.food.equipment
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Default HELP: Pitcher-style water filtration?

On Thu, 02 Jul 2009 20:23:44 -0400, Susan
wrote:

A lot of bottled spring waters taste great (Poland Spring) but aren't
any more pure on analysis, certainly.

Susan


Hi Susan,

Might you point me to a source for your comment above about
Poland Spring water?

Many thanks,
--
Kenneth

If you email... Please remove the "SPAMLESS."
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Old 04-07-2009, 08:19 PM posted to rec.food.equipment
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Default HELP: Pitcher-style water filtration?

In article ,
Susan wrote:

I think the bottom line is that there's no reason to believe that spring
water or other bottled water is more pure than tap.


It really depends on where one lives. I live in St Louis, and our
Missouri River drawn tap water has won recognition for its taste and
lack of impurities, so I am fine with my tap water as is, just add ice
or put a pitcher in the fridge.

However, I have had tap water with minerals other ultrafine impurities
in it that has a horrendous taste. If at the tap filtration can't clean
up that stuff, I could well understand drinking the bottled stuff.

jt


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Old 04-07-2009, 10:25 PM posted to rec.food.equipment
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Default HELP: Pitcher-style water filtration?


"jt august" wrote in message
...
In article ,
Susan wrote:

I think the bottom line is that there's no reason to believe that spring
water or other bottled water is more pure than tap.


It really depends on where one lives. I live in St Louis, and our
Missouri River drawn tap water has won recognition for its taste and
lack of impurities, so I am fine with my tap water as is, just add ice
or put a pitcher in the fridge.

However, I have had tap water with minerals other ultrafine impurities
in it that has a horrendous taste. If at the tap filtration can't clean
up that stuff, I could well understand drinking the bottled stuff.

jt


We don't use bottled, but we do filter. Our local water is "pure" but
smells and tastes like a swamp much of the time. The beverage of choice in
this house is water most times because it is now so good.


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Old 05-07-2009, 10:34 PM posted to rec.food.equipment
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Default HELP: Pitcher-style water filtration?

Elmo P. Shagnasty wrote:

But that would be BETTER water.

Why people would pay for water that may be NO better is the question.
And many tests have shown the bulk of bottled water is just tap water
drawn into a bottle and sold on the shelves.


Yes, I realized after I posted that we were talking about bottled, not
filtered water.

Forget the content, what about the endocrine disruptors in plastics?

Susan
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Old 05-07-2009, 10:54 PM posted to rec.food.equipment
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Default HELP: Pitcher-style water filtration?

Susan wrote:
Elmo P. Shagnasty wrote:

But that would be BETTER water.

Why people would pay for water that may be NO better is the
question. And many tests have shown the bulk of bottled water is
just tap water drawn into a bottle and sold on the shelves.


Yes, I realized after I posted that we were talking about bottled,
not filtered water.

Forget the content, what about the endocrine disruptors in plastics?


Endocrine disrupters and hormones can be present in the water before it
is bottled. This is especially true in water taken from rivers that have
treated sewerage from upstream. Think birth control pills.

http://cat.inist.fr/?aModele=afficheN&cpsidt=18553728

Occurrence and removal of pharmaceuticals and endocrine disruptors in
South Korean surface, drinking, and waste waters.


The elimination of these chemicals during drinking water and
wastewater treatment processes at full- and pilot-scale also was
investigated. Conventional drinking water treatment methods were
relatively inefficient for contaminant removal, while efficient
removal (?99%) was achieved by granular activated carbon (GAC). In
wastewater treatment processes, membrane bioreactors (MBR) showed
limited target compound removal, but were effective at eliminating
hormones and some pharmaceuticals (e.g., acetaminophen, ibuprofen,
and caffeine). Membrane filtration processes using reverse osmosis
(RO) and nanofiltration (NF) showed excellent removal (95%) for all
target analytes.


Sounds like reverse osmosis isn't all that effective against disrupters.

Matthew

--
"You give me a waterboard, Dick Cheney and one hour, and I'll have him
confess to the Sharon Tate murders." -- Jesse Ventura


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