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Old 24-08-2009, 10:01 AM posted to alt.food.mexican-cooking
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Default I need a little help


"little man upon the stair" wrote in message
...
On Aug 23, 6:34?pm, "EmmyBlue" wrote:
I'm old school, I like my eggs cooked a skillet over a low flame...low and
slow in butter is the key to perfect scrambled eggs.


I always thought that I liked the taste of eggs, but it turned out I
actually liked the taste of the butter on my toast.

I use my microwave mostly to melt things, or reheat. I love old fashioned
cooking, love the dance of fire and knives.


I like the convenience and speed and the automatic operation of a
microwave.

For instance, I can assemble a tamale pie in about 15 minutes and nuke
it for 20 minutes and I can walk away and do something else while it
steams itself inside the covered Pyrex bowl for another half hour or
45 minutes.

I make a hearty pozole (Mexican white hominy stew) in the microwave in
the same way.

I could spend hours doing those things "authentically" in an outdoor
horno,
or a pib, but microwaving on my kitchen countertop is so much
easier...
~~~~~~~~
Like I said, I LOVE to cook...for just me or a group of friends. It relaxes
me, it's fun, not a chore that takes me away from other things. I have a
glass of wine, play music...shut out the problems of the world and get into
the zen of cooking.

Besides, I have invested so much money in my lovely pans....


--
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Old 24-08-2009, 02:32 PM posted to alt.food.mexican-cooking
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On Aug 24, 2:01*am, "EmmyBlue" wrote:

Like I said, I LOVE to cook...for just me or a group of friends. It relaxes
me, it's fun, not a chore that takes me away from other things. I have a
glass of wine, play music...shut out the problems of the world and get into
the zen of cooking.
Besides, I have invested so much money in my lovely pans....


I can certainly understand the female vs. male viewpoint as regards
cooking and how much TLC you ladies add to everything you prepare.

Most of what we Americans think of as Mexican "cuisine" is rather
casually prepared, in a short time from limited fresh ingredients and
is often eaten just as casually, out-of-hand, like a taco or a
burrito, or maybe it's a Mexican salad dish
that takes minutes to prepare.

All those things can be found at the casual Mexican grills called
"taquerias".

Such items are called "antojitos" which means "little trifle" in
Spanish. I once had a list of about 50 similar antojitos that were
basically made from ground white corn masa, some sort of meat or
poultry and a chile sauce.

There are also "platas fuertes", main course dishes which take hours
to prepare.

Since Mexican peasants living in isolated villages in the central
highland usually didn't have electricity or refrigeration, whatever
meat they included in their platas fuertes was usually freshly
butchered and unaged, so it required more cooking to make it tender.

So it was skillet browned and then boiled until it was falling apart
like the pork in a pit barbecue. When you can shred the pork with two
forks, it's called a "tinga" or
"hash".

But I don't want to hang around watching a pot boil...

I prepare platas fuertes like frijoles con puerco (beans with pork) or
birria de chivo
(a lamb or goat stew) in a slow cooker so I can go off and do
something else as the low heat slowly tenderizes the meat.


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Old 25-08-2009, 02:43 AM posted to alt.food.mexican-cooking
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Default I need a little help

"Nunya Bidnits" wrote in
:

EmmyBlue said:
Ah, I love the Eagles...always thought colitas is a flower.


It's pot, but otherwise that is correct, referring to unpollenated
flower bud, but a rather arcane term probably known only to children
of the sixties and anyone who has analyzed those lyrics in detail.

MBKC





reading on colitas- http://www.straightdope.com/columns/read/1053/in-the-
song-hotel-california-what-does-colitas-mean
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Old 25-08-2009, 02:34 PM posted to alt.food.mexican-cooking
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On Aug 24, 9:01´┐Żam, "Nunya Bidnits" [email protected]
september.invalid wrote:

Care to share that quick tamale pie recipe?


Mix your instant masa a little thicker and stickier than you would if
you were making tamales in corn husks so it will stick to the sides of
your Pyrex
bowl.

Grease or apply vegetable oil to the sides and bottom of the bowl so
the masa won't stick.

Pour whatever meat and chile sauce filling you've previously prepared
into the masa-lined bowl and cover it with a layer of masa.

Microwave on high for 15~20 minutes, then let it sit and steam itself
for 45 minutes before taking the lid off.

A lot of people get hung up over the way they think some particular
Mexican
dish should *look*, instead of how it should taste.

But I'm after the flavors first, and I want to enjoy flavors instead
of admiring appearances.

After all, I am going to tear everything apart with knife and fork and
chew it up within a matter of minutes...

You can even make an "inside out tamale" if you want.

Just make some little 1/2 inch diameter balls with instant masa and
drop them into your chile sauce as it simmers on the stove top.

That makes a sort of corn meal dumpling which is called a "bollito" or
something like that.





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Old 25-08-2009, 04:34 PM posted to alt.food.mexican-cooking
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On Aug 25, 7:23*am, "Nunya Bidnits" [email protected]
september.invalid wrote:

By instant masa, are you referring to masa harina?


Yes. "Masa" is dough, but most people simply call maseca or masa
harina "masa", assuming that the reader *knows* what they're talking
about.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Masa

There are recipes like pambazo where the "masa" referred to is made
with ordinary wheat flour and holdajres (sp?) where the masa uses a
pastry flour mix.




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Old 26-08-2009, 04:59 PM posted to alt.food.mexican-cooking
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"mack the knife" wrote in message
...
"Nunya Bidnits" wrote in
:

EmmyBlue said:
Ah, I love the Eagles...always thought colitas is a flower.


It's pot, but otherwise that is correct, referring to unpollenated
flower bud, but a rather arcane term probably known only to children
of the sixties and anyone who has analyzed those lyrics in detail.

MBKC

reading on colitas- http://www.straightdope.com/columns/read/1053/in-the-
song-hotel-california-what-does-colitas-mean

~~~
Aha - 'little buds' makes perfect sense.
evb...child of the early 70's when a 3-finger lid was $10
--
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Old 26-08-2009, 05:10 PM posted to alt.food.mexican-cooking
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"Nunya Bidnits" wrote in message
...
[..]

Thanks! Do you ever use poblanos instead of rellenos? I make a baked
stuffed
poblano, I guess technically that makes it a relleno. I fill the roasted
and
peeled peppers with a mixture of grilled or smoked chicken, cream cheese,
chihuahua cheese, chiliancho paste, and a little chipotle, then top with
cheese and bake till heated through and melted.

It's the batter which always worried me, and managing to keep the filling
inside when frying. Have you deep fried these?

MartyB in KC

~~~~~~~~~
No, never used any peppers but Anaheims, which is what my landlady used.
They are plenty hot too, if you leave too many seeds and veins in. Yes, I
have deep-fried them, the batter isn't as scary as you think...it puffs up
immediately and holds the filling in.

Your chicken mixture sounds good...sort of like something I saw that PBS
chef wot travels Mexico and cooks rustic authentic dishes...can't think of
his name. Last saw him on Food Network in a chef throw-down.
evb
--
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Old 26-08-2009, 05:13 PM posted to alt.food.mexican-cooking
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"little man upon the stair" wrote in message
...
On Aug 24, 2:01 am, "EmmyBlue" wrote:

Like I said, I LOVE to cook...for just me or a group of friends. It
relaxes
me, it's fun, not a chore that takes me away from other things. I have a
glass of wine, play music...shut out the problems of the world and get
into
the zen of cooking.
Besides, I have invested so much money in my lovely pans....


I can certainly understand the female vs. male viewpoint as regards
cooking and how much TLC you ladies add to everything you prepare.

[..]
~~~~~~~~~
Now, now...there are more famous male chefs than female...and I have many
male friends who love to cook the old-fashioned way...straight too. ;D
evb

--
http://soonerblue.bloghi.com/


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Old 26-08-2009, 07:42 PM posted to alt.food.mexican-cooking
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On Aug 26, 9:37*am, "Nunya Bidnits" [email protected]
september.invalid wrote:

Since you brought up chorizo, I've got a question. The chorizo in stores
around here comes in a chub, Supremo and Cacique are two common brands. They
are very difficult to work with, rendering a large percentage of it's weight
in grease and the meat is tough and fibrous. I can get fresh chorizo at a
couple local markets but it doesn't have as much flavor. How do you work
with this stuff in the chub to make it more palatable?


I don't buy the fresh stuff.

I can buy the El Mexicano chorizo in a 16-oz tube at the 99 Cents Only
store and just squeeze a few ounces onto a paper plate and microwave
it for two minutes and the excess grease runs out and I throw the
paper plate away.

I could buy fresh chorizo on a styrofoam tray and spend several
minutes frying it and draining off half the weight in grease and then
I have a greasy skillet to wash, and that takes another five minutes
to wash and dry.

So, like the guy in the Beatles song, "Day Tripper", I've got a good
reason for takin' the easy way out...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chorizo#North_America

"Mexican chorizo comes in two varieties, fresh and dried, the fresh
being much more common. Chorizo can be made from a variety of meat
cuts, including lips, lymph nodes, and salivary glands. The meat is
finely ground and stuffed in plastic tubes to resemble sausage links,
though traditionally natural casings were used. Before consumption,
the tubes are usually cut open and the nearly paste-like mixture is
fried in a pan and mashed with a fork until it resembles finely minced
ground beef."


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Old 29-08-2009, 01:32 PM posted to alt.food.mexican-cooking
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Thanks for shareing-you made it sound simple enought to try-i wouldlove
to try more mexican dishes but have been afraid as some sound so
complicated-thanks again will try this,Mary



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Old 14-10-2009, 06:21 PM posted to alt.food.mexican-cooking
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"Jack" wrote in message
...
On Aug 16, 4:35 am, "EmmyBlue" wrote:
Decades ago in Long Beach, CA, a Mex./Amer. landlady used to invite me to
her family dinners. The food, my god, the food was to die for. Her chile
rellenos were so good that I begged her to teach me how to make them, and
she did.

She made a pinto beans and greens dish with bacon and onion that was also
a
particular favorite of mine...cooked in a big cast iron skillet. What she
called it sounded like "ka-lee-tees." I have searched the Internet just
using the ingredients, but to no avail.

Does anyone here know what I'm looking for? If not, is there another food
newsgroup that would know?

I thank you for any help.
ev

--http://soonerblue.bloghi.com/


Sounds like "Quelite". Wikipedia states: Quelite can mean any of a
number of different plants eaten in Mexico for their leaves, as leaf
vegetables or herbs, including but not limited to: Amaranthus,
Chenopodium or Coriandrum species. Maybe it was just Coriander
(Cilantro)?
Good luck............

jack

Just ran across this bit on greens that may help:

http://mexicocooks.typepad.com/mexic...-the-unam.html

or http://tinyurl.com/yk6lbfu




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