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Old 16-08-2009, 09:35 AM posted to alt.food.mexican-cooking
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Default I need a little help

Decades ago in Long Beach, CA, a Mex./Amer. landlady used to invite me to
her family dinners. The food, my god, the food was to die for. Her chile
rellenos were so good that I begged her to teach me how to make them, and
she did.

She made a pinto beans and greens dish with bacon and onion that was also a
particular favorite of mine...cooked in a big cast iron skillet. What she
called it sounded like "ka-lee-tees." I have searched the Internet just
using the ingredients, but to no avail.

Does anyone here know what I'm looking for? If not, is there another food
newsgroup that would know?

I thank you for any help.
ev

--
http://soonerblue.bloghi.com/



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Old 16-08-2009, 02:56 PM posted to alt.food.mexican-cooking
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Default I need a little help

On Aug 16, 1:35*am, "EmmyBlue" wrote:

She made a pinto beans and greens dish with bacon and onion that was also a
particular favorite of mine...cooked in a big cast iron skillet. What she
called it sounded like "ka-lee-tees." I have searched the Internet just
using the ingredients, but to no avail.


I am reminded of Eagles song, "Hotel California"...

"On a dark desert highway, cool wind in my hair, warm smell of colitas
rising up through the air."

Eriogonum jamesii is a species of wild buckwheat known by the common
name James' buckwheat and Antelope sage. It is native to southwestern
North America (Colorado, Utah, and New Mexico).

Do Mexican cooks use native plants such as sage to flavor such dishes,
or does the recipe include chiles de arbol (colitas de rata)?
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Old 17-08-2009, 08:02 PM posted to alt.food.mexican-cooking
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Default I need a little help

On Aug 16, 4:35*am, "EmmyBlue" wrote:
Decades ago in Long Beach, CA, a Mex./Amer. landlady used to invite me to
her family dinners. The food, my god, the food was to die for. Her chile
rellenos were so good that I begged her to teach me how to make them, and
she did.

She made a pinto beans and greens dish with bacon and onion that was also a
particular favorite of mine...cooked in a big cast iron skillet. What she
called it sounded like "ka-lee-tees." I have searched the Internet just
using the ingredients, but to no avail.

Does anyone here know what I'm looking for? If not, is there another food
newsgroup that would know?

I thank you for any help.
ev

--http://soonerblue.bloghi.com/


Sounds like "Quelite". Wikipedia states: Quelite can mean any of a
number of different plants eaten in Mexico for their leaves, as leaf
vegetables or herbs, including but not limited to: Amaranthus,
Chenopodium or Coriandrum species. Maybe it was just Coriander
(Cilantro)?
Good luck............

jack

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Old 20-08-2009, 12:31 PM posted to alt.food.mexican-cooking
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Default I need a little help


"Nunya Bidnits" wrote in message
...
EmmyBlue said:
Decades ago in Long Beach, CA, a Mex./Amer. landlady used to invite
me to her family dinners. The food, my god, the food was to die for.
Her chile rellenos were so good that I begged her to teach me how to
make them, and she did.

She made a pinto beans and greens dish with bacon and onion that was
also a particular favorite of mine...cooked in a big cast iron
skillet. What she called it sounded like "ka-lee-tees." I have
searched the Internet just using the ingredients, but to no avail.

Does anyone here know what I'm looking for? If not, is there another
food newsgroup that would know?

I thank you for any help.
ev


This sounds wonderful and I would also like to know the recipe. But this
NG
is pretty dead. You should try posting in rec.food.cooking if you don't
mind
navigating around a lot of trash posts, or alt.food.recipes, or
rec.food.recipes.

But if you could, would you kindly post that rellenos recipe you
mentioned?

MartyB in KC

~~~~~~~~~
Well, it's not really a recipe...

Blackening and peeling the Anaheim peppers is the most time consuming part.
You put them directly in the flame of the burner...after they're black and
blistered, put them in a paper sack or a plastic bag for about 20 min, then
they peel pretty easily.

Then you slit the pepper down the side about half way, cut through the seed
pod just under the inside of the stem and pull it out carefully. Stuff the
peppers with Monterey Jack cheese and roll them in flour.

People are scared of the batter...but you just separate your eggs and beat
the whites until stiff....beat the yolks with salt and a spoon of flour and
*carefully* fold into the beaten whites. The key is to not deflate the
whites too much. Dip peppers in batter and fry in 2" oil in a cast iron
skillet. I like mine with sour cream and a fresh pico de gallo (chopped
tomatoes, fresh chiles, onions, cumin, salt, and lime juice)...or bottled
salsa if I'm lazy.

You can also make baked chile rellenos -- Lay the stuffed peppers in a
greased casserole and pour the batter over. Sprinkle w grated cheese and
bake about until batter is done and lightly browned on top.

Now let's talk about Tamale Pie....made with masa harina...I'm collecting
recipes in my quest for the perfect one.

EmmyV in OK
--
http://soonerblue.bloghi.com/


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Old 20-08-2009, 12:35 PM posted to alt.food.mexican-cooking
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"Jack" wrote in message
...
On Aug 16, 4:35 am, "EmmyBlue" wrote:
Decades ago in Long Beach, CA, a Mex./Amer. landlady used to invite me to
her family dinners. The food, my god, the food was to die for. Her chile
rellenos were so good that I begged her to teach me how to make them, and
she did.

She made a pinto beans and greens dish with bacon and onion that was also
a
particular favorite of mine...cooked in a big cast iron skillet. What she
called it sounded like "ka-lee-tees." I have searched the Internet just
using the ingredients, but to no avail.

Does anyone here know what I'm looking for? If not, is there another food
newsgroup that would know?

I thank you for any help.
ev


Sounds like "Quelite". Wikipedia states: Quelite can mean any of a
number of different plants eaten in Mexico for their leaves, as leaf
vegetables or herbs, including but not limited to: Amaranthus,
Chenopodium or Coriandrum species. Maybe it was just Coriander
(Cilantro)?
Good luck............

jack
~~~~~~~~
Hmmm...I wonder what the Mexican word for mustard greens is...
ev
--
http://soonerblue.bloghi.com/





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Old 20-08-2009, 12:40 PM posted to alt.food.mexican-cooking
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Default I need a little help

"little man upon the stair" wrote in message
...
On Aug 16, 1:35 am, "EmmyBlue" wrote:

She made a pinto beans and greens dish with bacon and onion that was also
a
particular favorite of mine...cooked in a big cast iron skillet. What she
called it sounded like "ka-lee-tees." I have searched the Internet just
using the ingredients, but to no avail.


I am reminded of Eagles song, "Hotel California"...

"On a dark desert highway, cool wind in my hair, warm smell of colitas
rising up through the air."

Eriogonum jamesii is a species of wild buckwheat known by the common
name James' buckwheat and Antelope sage. It is native to southwestern
North America (Colorado, Utah, and New Mexico).

Do Mexican cooks use native plants such as sage to flavor such dishes,
or does the recipe include chiles de arbol (colitas de rata)?
~~~~~~
Ah, I love the Eagles...always thought colitas is a flower.

You know, my landlady used baby talk a lot, called enchiladas
'enchiladees'...maybe that's a clue.
emmyv
--
http://soonerblue.bloghi.com/


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Old 20-08-2009, 02:14 PM posted to alt.food.mexican-cooking
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On Aug 20, 4:35*am, "EmmyBlue" wrote:

Hmmm...I wonder what the Mexican word for mustard greens is...


Mustard spinach is called "espinaca mostaza". The yellow mustard
flowers that grow wild everywhere are called "ajenabe".

Hay mucho mas aqui:

http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brassica_nigra

La mostaza negra o ajenabe (Brassica nigra) es una planta herbácea
anual, cultivada por sus semillas, que se emplean como especia.

http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brassica

Brassica perviridis: tender green (verde tierno), mustard spinach
(espinaca mostaza)

Brassica juncea: mostaza india (indian mustard), mostaza marrón y de
hoja (brown and leaf mustards), mostaza Sarepta.




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Old 20-08-2009, 02:23 PM posted to alt.food.mexican-cooking
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On Aug 20, 4:40*am, "EmmyBlue" wrote:

You know, my landlady used baby talk a lot, called enchiladas
'enchiladees'...maybe that's a clue.


Well, here's a major clue:

The names of Mexican dishes often refer to the cooking process, and
other dishes that use the same cooking processes are based upon other
ingredients.

For instance, "cocido" just means "cooked", but if you went into a
taqueria and
saw "cocido" listed on the wall menu, it would probably be Mexican-
style beef stew, which is made without any gravy at all.

"Fritada" simply means "fried". Everybody knows that you can fry
anything you throw into a skillet, but "fritada" probably means "fried
fish" to a Mexican.

Finally, back to "enchilada".

To an American, an "enchilada" is rolled-up tortillas in red chile
sauce with beef or cheese inside and melted cheese on top.

But in Mexico, an "enchilada" is *anything* in a chile sauce or with
chile sauce in it.

For instance, "queso enchilado" is a spicy Mexican cheese.


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Old 20-08-2009, 02:26 PM posted to alt.food.mexican-cooking
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Default I need a little help

On Aug 20, 4:35*am, "EmmyBlue" wrote:
"Jack" wrote in message
Sounds like "Quelite". Wikipedia states: Quelite can mean any of a
number of different plants eaten in Mexico for their leaves, as leaf
vegetables or herbs, including but not limited to: Amaranthus,
Chenopodium or Coriandrum species. Maybe it was just Coriander
(Cilantro)?


http://groups.google.com/group/alt.f...n&q=huazontles

Read Rolly Brook's website, especially his glossary of Mexican food
terms.

And, if you decide you want to cook up a dish containing Mexican
"greens", be sure to buy them from a grocery store that sells
traditional Mexican produce,
since some similar-looking plants that grow wild in the USA may be
poisonous...


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Old 22-08-2009, 02:17 AM posted to alt.food.mexican-cooking
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Default I need a little help


"little man upon the stair" wrote in message
...
On Aug 20, 4:40 am, "EmmyBlue" wrote:

You know, my landlady used baby talk a lot, called enchiladas
'enchiladees'...maybe that's a clue.


Well, here's a major clue:

The names of Mexican dishes often refer to the cooking process, and
other dishes that use the same cooking processes are based upon other
ingredients.

For instance, "cocido" just means "cooked", but if you went into a
taqueria and
saw "cocido" listed on the wall menu, it would probably be Mexican-
style beef stew, which is made without any gravy at all.

"Fritada" simply means "fried". Everybody knows that you can fry
anything you throw into a skillet, but "fritada" probably means "fried
fish" to a Mexican.

Finally, back to "enchilada".

To an American, an "enchilada" is rolled-up tortillas in red chile
sauce with beef or cheese inside and melted cheese on top.

But in Mexico, an "enchilada" is *anything* in a chile sauce or with
chile sauce in it.

For instance, "queso enchilado" is a spicy Mexican cheese.
~~~~~~~~~
Thanks for the enlightenment.
evb
--
http://soonerblue.bloghi.com/





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Old 22-08-2009, 07:25 PM posted to alt.food.mexican-cooking
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Default I need a little help


"EmmyBlue" wrote in message
...
Decades ago in Long Beach, CA, a Mex./Amer. landlady used to invite me to
her family dinners. The food, my god, the food was to die for. Her chile
rellenos were so good that I begged her to teach me how to make them, and
she did.

She made a pinto beans and greens dish with bacon and onion that was also
a particular favorite of mine...cooked in a big cast iron skillet. What
she called it sounded like "ka-lee-tees." I have searched the Internet
just using the ingredients, but to no avail.

Does anyone here know what I'm looking for? If not, is there another food
newsgroup that would know?

I thank you for any help.
ev

--
http://soonerblue.bloghi.com/



Try this:

Dimitri

For breakfast I wanted Chilaquiles. I still haven't made enchilada
sauce so I used my good ol' standby. I was too lazy to fry up some old
tortillas so I used pre-made tostada shells. These I usually have on
hand also. They are great for ceviche tostadas.
I got together the enchilada sauce, tortillas, onion and cheese.
http://i31.tinypic.com/2hi002t.jpg

Poured a little of the sauce into the baking pan. Just enough to coat
the bottom of the pan.
http://i30.tinypic.com/f051qb.jpg

Add broken up tortillas,
http://i32.tinypic.com/fu0qqb.jpg

and layer in some cheese and onion.
http://i26.tinypic.com/2s1n11f.jpg

Repeat. Top layer should be sauce and cheese and onion.
http://i29.tinypic.com/29vcl54.jpg

Place in a 350* oven until hot and bubbly.

While the chilaquiles were baking I fried some bacon and scrambled up
some eggs.
http://i28.tinypic.com/6gk65t.jpg

This made a great breakfast with some sliced heirloom tomatoes.
http://i26.tinypic.com/fxe9uh.jpg

koko
--

There is no love more sincere than the love of food
George Bernard Shaw
www.kokoscorner.typepad.com
updated 08/09

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Old 23-08-2009, 05:43 PM posted to alt.food.mexican-cooking
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Default I need a little help

"Dimitri" wrote in message
...

"EmmyBlue" wrote in message
...
Decades ago in Long Beach, CA, a Mex./Amer. landlady used to invite me to
her family dinners. The food, my god, the food was to die for. Her chile
rellenos were so good that I begged her to teach me how to make them, and
she did.

She made a pinto beans and greens dish with bacon and onion that was also
a particular favorite of mine...cooked in a big cast iron skillet. What
she called it sounded like "ka-lee-tees." I have searched the Internet
just using the ingredients, but to no avail.

Does anyone here know what I'm looking for? If not, is there another food
newsgroup that would know?

I thank you for any help.
ev

--
http://soonerblue.bloghi.com/



Try this:

Dimitri

For breakfast I wanted Chilaquiles. I still haven't made enchilada
sauce so I used my good ol' standby. I was too lazy to fry up some old
tortillas so I used pre-made tostada shells. These I usually have on
hand also. They are great for ceviche tostadas.
I got together the enchilada sauce, tortillas, onion and cheese.
http://i31.tinypic.com/2hi002t.jpg

Poured a little of the sauce into the baking pan. Just enough to coat
the bottom of the pan.
http://i30.tinypic.com/f051qb.jpg

Add broken up tortillas,
http://i32.tinypic.com/fu0qqb.jpg

and layer in some cheese and onion.
http://i26.tinypic.com/2s1n11f.jpg

Repeat. Top layer should be sauce and cheese and onion.
http://i29.tinypic.com/29vcl54.jpg

Place in a 350* oven until hot and bubbly.

While the chilaquiles were baking I fried some bacon and scrambled up
some eggs.
http://i28.tinypic.com/6gk65t.jpg

This made a great breakfast with some sliced heirloom tomatoes.
http://i26.tinypic.com/fxe9uh.jpg

koko

~~~~~~~~~
How scrumptious! I'd kill for those heirloom tomatoes.

I just scrambled some eggs with leftover fried rice, sprinkled it w grated
cheese and rolled it all up in a flour tortilla and dipped it in tomato
salsa.

I like to scramble eggs with onions, peppers and broken bits of tortilla
chips...sprinkled with grated Pepper jack while still warm.
ev
--
http://soonerblue.bloghi.com/


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Old 23-08-2009, 07:15 PM posted to alt.food.mexican-cooking
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On Aug 23, 9:43*am, "EmmyBlue" wrote:

I like to scramble eggs with onions, peppers and broken bits of tortilla
chips...sprinkled with grated Pepper jack while still warm.


Most mornings I microwave about 2 tablespoons of El Mexicano chorizo
for
1 or 2 minutes so most of the grease and chile sauce separates from
the meat.

Then I break two eggs into a small styrofoam bowl and stir the eggs up
with some grated cheese and the chorizo and nuke that mixture on
medium for three minutes.

That makes a nice Mexican-style omelette I wish I could figure out how
to make loose scrambled eggs in the microwave...


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Old 24-08-2009, 02:34 AM posted to alt.food.mexican-cooking
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Default I need a little help

"little man upon the stair" wrote in message
...
On Aug 23, 9:43 am, "EmmyBlue" wrote:

I like to scramble eggs with onions, peppers and broken bits of tortilla
chips...sprinkled with grated Pepper jack while still warm.


Most mornings I microwave about 2 tablespoons of El Mexicano chorizo
for
1 or 2 minutes so most of the grease and chile sauce separates from
the meat.

Then I break two eggs into a small styrofoam bowl and stir the eggs up
with some grated cheese and the chorizo and nuke that mixture on
medium for three minutes.

That makes a nice Mexican-style omelette I wish I could figure out how
to make loose scrambled eggs in the microwave...
~~~~~
I'm old school, I like my eggs cooked a skillet over a low flame...low and
slow in butter is the key to perfect scrambled eggs.

I use my microwave mostly to melt things, or reheat. I love old fashioned
cooking, love the dance of fire and knives.
ev

--
http://soonerblue.bloghi.com/


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Old 24-08-2009, 04:40 AM posted to alt.food.mexican-cooking
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Default I need a little help

On Aug 23, 6:34�pm, "EmmyBlue" wrote:
I'm old school, I like my eggs cooked a skillet over a low flame...low and
slow in butter is the key to perfect scrambled eggs.


I always thought that I liked the taste of eggs, but it turned out I
actually liked the taste of the butter on my toast.

I use my microwave mostly to melt things, or reheat. I love old fashioned
cooking, love the dance of fire and knives.


I like the convenience and speed and the automatic operation of a
microwave.

For instance, I can assemble a tamale pie in about 15 minutes and nuke
it for 20 minutes and I can walk away and do something else while it
steams itself inside the covered Pyrex bowl for another half hour or
45 minutes.

I make a hearty pozole (Mexican white hominy stew) in the microwave in
the same way.

I could spend hours doing those things "authentically" in an outdoor
horno,
or a pib, but microwaving on my kitchen countertop is so much
easier...






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