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  #241 (permalink)   Report Post  
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Sheldon
 
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Jen wrote:
> "Kathy in NZ" > wrote in message
> ...
> > On Wed, 18 Jan 2006 15:30:26 GMT, sarah bennett
> > > wrote:
> >
> >>Kathy in NZ wrote:
> >>> On 17 Jan 2006 09:28:58 -0800, "Sheldon" > wrote:

> >
> >>> Your experience of people ordering enough to take home to feed
> >>> themselves for several meals and also offering to leave a tip is
> >>> foreign to me. Firstly because we don't tip in NZ. The amount on the
> >>> restaurant bill is the total bill. It is not necessary to leave tips
> >>> in NZ, though I accept you must tip in some countries.
> >>
> >>they must pay waitstaff better in NZ. Here in the US, it is legally
> >>mandated that you do not have to pay them more than $@ and change per
> >>hour, because they are expected to make up the rest with tips.
> >>

> >
> >>saerah

> >
> > Yes waitstaff are paid a proper wage. That's not to say it's a high
> > wage, but they earn more than the legal minimum hourly rate and don't
> > rely on tips. New Zealanders don't want to see tipping become a way of
> > life here. People are paid to do their job. They shouldn't have to be
> > paid extra to do it willingly. Tourists are advised tipping is
> > unnecessary everywhere and to everyone here. That's not to say
> > waitstaff wouldn't like to be tipped, they would, but only because
> > it's icing on the cake. I am only referring here to NZ, not the
> > necessity to tip in the US.
> >
> > Kathy in NZ

>
>
> It's the same in Australia. Any form of employment gets a proper wage.
>
> Jen


Who decides what's a proper wage? With your system there is no
incentive for service occupations to do a lick more than they can get
away with... I've been to parts of europe where tipping was not the
norm, decent service was non-existant, not to mention rude, did I say
*rude*. In the US an ambitious hard working wait person can earn a
very good living, on par with white collar salaries, often much better.
On the other hand those who are lazy barely earn minimum wage and
typically don't last very long. As an example, I have a cousin who is
an OR RN, she worked at a notable University teaching hospital on Lung
Guyland. After about ten years on the job she was grossing about
$55,000/yr. Finally she had it waiting on sick people... and being
abused by MDs, doctor's personalities are the pits. In her thirties
she decided to go back to her old occupation that put her through
nursing school, waitressing. She doubled her net pay the first year
and cut the stress factor to near zero. Lung Guyland has tons of very
fine restaurants, prices are high with tipping to match. No, you are
not going to earn a whole lot waiting tables at some family style
chain, and certainly not running meat loaf and pork chops at the local
greazy spoon diner... but at the better caliber restaurants a wait
person who knows their potatoes and is willing to hustle butt can earn
a remarkable amount of money.

I'd much rather tip and receive first rate professional service, where
the service industry has a built in incentive to excel. Your no
tipping system encourages sevice industry people to provide as little
as they can get away with, lowers all service to the level of the
lowest possible denominator... you'd probably opt to serve yourselves
to save a few pennies... even offer to wash your own dishes if they
took 50 off your tab... you may as well stay home.

Sheldon

  #242 (permalink)   Report Post  
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Dave Smith
 
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jmcquown wrote:

>
> > OK, now you're being weird... first you don't "get" Thai tea and now
> > you like lima beans. Odd, very very odd. LOL

>
> I don't "get" people who don't like lima beans! I love them. But like
> Elaine, they have to be fresh or frozen.


I don't get what people like about them. There are some vegetables that I
like more than others, some that I prefer certain ways, some that I would
just as well not eat, but lima beans is/ are <?> one that I just plain don't
like.


  #243 (permalink)   Report Post  
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sarah bennett
 
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Sheldon wrote:
> Jen wrote:
>
>>"Kathy in NZ" > wrote in message
...
>>
>>>On Wed, 18 Jan 2006 15:30:26 GMT, sarah bennett
> wrote:
>>>
>>>
>>>>Kathy in NZ wrote:
>>>>
>>>>>On 17 Jan 2006 09:28:58 -0800, "Sheldon" > wrote:
>>>
>>>>>Your experience of people ordering enough to take home to feed
>>>>>themselves for several meals and also offering to leave a tip is
>>>>>foreign to me. Firstly because we don't tip in NZ. The amount on the
>>>>>restaurant bill is the total bill. It is not necessary to leave tips
>>>>>in NZ, though I accept you must tip in some countries.
>>>>
>>>>they must pay waitstaff better in NZ. Here in the US, it is legally
>>>>mandated that you do not have to pay them more than $@ and change per
>>>>hour, because they are expected to make up the rest with tips.
>>>>
>>>
>>>>saerah
>>>
>>>Yes waitstaff are paid a proper wage. That's not to say it's a high
>>>wage, but they earn more than the legal minimum hourly rate and don't
>>>rely on tips. New Zealanders don't want to see tipping become a way of
>>>life here. People are paid to do their job. They shouldn't have to be
>>>paid extra to do it willingly. Tourists are advised tipping is
>>>unnecessary everywhere and to everyone here. That's not to say
>>>waitstaff wouldn't like to be tipped, they would, but only because
>>>it's icing on the cake. I am only referring here to NZ, not the
>>>necessity to tip in the US.
>>>
>>>Kathy in NZ

>>
>>
>>It's the same in Australia. Any form of employment gets a proper wage.
>>
>>Jen

>
>
> Who decides what's a proper wage? With your system there is no
> incentive for service occupations to do a lick more than they can get
> away with...


Why should waiters and waitresses be held to a higher standard than
others in the service industry? Even the cashier at a McDonald's makes
more per hour.

>I've been to parts of europe where tipping was not the
> norm, decent service was non-existant, not to mention rude, did I say
> *rude*. In the US an ambitious hard working wait person can earn a
> very good living, on par with white collar salaries, often much better.


Only in the most expensive restaurants. Most waiters and waitresses
don't work in those places. They are taxed on what the government
expects them to be tipped, whether they are actually tipped or not.

<snip>


--

saerah

http://anisaerah.blogspot.com/

"Peace is not an absence of war, it is a virtue, a state of mind, a
disposition for benevolence, confidence, justice."
-Baruch Spinoza

"There is a theory which states that if ever anybody discovers exactly
what the Universe is for and why it is here, it will instantly disappear
and be replaced by something even more bizarre and inexplicable. There
is another theory which states that this has already happened."
-Douglas Adams
  #244 (permalink)   Report Post  
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Dave Smith
 
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Sheldon wrote:

> Who decides what's a proper wage? With your system there is no
> incentive for service occupations to do a lick more than they can get
> away with... I've been to parts of europe where tipping was not the
> norm, decent service was non-existant, not to mention rude, did I say
> *rude*.


I have been to places in US and Canada where tips are expected and service was
slow, sloppy and sometimes rude. I have been to places in Europe where tips
are not expected, service usually being included in the price, and the service
was excellent. So many of us are so intimidated about tipping that we leave
at least 15% even if service was rotten, more if it was acceptable. In those
parts of Europe where service is included, it is still in the waiter's
interest to bring food quickly and to push more food and drink sales. I just
don't buy the argument that tipping ensures better service.

> In the US an ambitious hard working wait person can earn a
> very good living, on par with white collar salaries, often much better.
> On the other hand those who are lazy barely earn minimum wage and
> typically don't last very long. As an example, I have a cousin who is
> an OR RN, she worked at a notable University teaching hospital on Lung
> Guyland. After about ten years on the job she was grossing about
> $55,000/yr. Finally she had it waiting on sick people... and being
> abused by MDs, doctor's personalities are the pits. In her thirties
> she decided to go back to her old occupation that put her through
> nursing school, waitressing. She doubled her net pay the first year
> and cut the stress factor to near zero. Lung Guyland has tons of very
> fine restaurants, prices are high with tipping to match. No, you are
> not going to earn a whole lot waiting tables at some family style
> chain, and certainly not running meat loaf and pork chops at the local
> greazy spoon diner... but at the better caliber restaurants a wait
> person who knows their potatoes and is willing to hustle butt can earn
> a remarkable amount of money.
>
> I'd much rather tip and receive first rate professional service, where
> the service industry has a built in incentive to excel. Your no
> tipping system encourages sevice industry people to provide as little
> as they can get away with, lowers all service to the level of the
> lowest possible denominator... you'd probably opt to serve yourselves
> to save a few pennies... even offer to wash your own dishes if they
> took 50 off your tab... you may as well stay home.
>
> Sheldon


  #245 (permalink)   Report Post  
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aem
 
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Sheldon wrote:
>
> Who decides what's a proper wage? With your system there is no
> incentive for service occupations to do a lick more than they can get
> away with... I've been to parts of europe where tipping was not the
> norm, decent service was non-existant, not to mention rude, did I say
> *rude*.


They are describing how it is in New Zealand and Australia. In the
three months we traveled there we found that first rate, friendly
service was the norm almost everywhere we went, at all price levels of
restaurants. Not surprising, really, given their less mercenary
cultures.

[snip the rest, so as not to incite yet another of these discussions
about tipping] -aem



  #246 (permalink)   Report Post  
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aem
 
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Dave Smith wrote:
> jmcquown wrote
> >
> > > OK, now you're being weird... first you don't "get" Thai tea and now
> > > you like lima beans. Odd, very very odd. LOL

> >
> > I don't "get" people who don't like lima beans! I love them. But like
> > Elaine, they have to be fresh or frozen.

>
> I don't get what people like about them. There are some vegetables that I
> like more than others, some that I prefer certain ways, some that I would
> just as well not eat, but lima beans is/ are <?> one that I just plain don't
> like.


Me, too. There's a reason the ham and lima beans meal in a case of
C-rations was always the last to go (unless your unit had troops from
South Carolina -- for some reason they liked 'em). Same reason that
meal had a notorious nickname. -aem

  #247 (permalink)   Report Post  
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sarah bennett
 
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aem wrote:
> Dave Smith wrote:
>
>>jmcquown wrote
>>
>>>>OK, now you're being weird... first you don't "get" Thai tea and now
>>>>you like lima beans. Odd, very very odd. LOL
>>>
>>>I don't "get" people who don't like lima beans! I love them. But like
>>>Elaine, they have to be fresh or frozen.

>>
>>I don't get what people like about them. There are some vegetables that I
>>like more than others, some that I prefer certain ways, some that I would
>>just as well not eat, but lima beans is/ are <?> one that I just plain don't
>>like.

>
>
> Me, too. There's a reason the ham and lima beans meal in a case of
> C-rations was always the last to go (unless your unit had troops from
> South Carolina -- for some reason they liked 'em). Same reason that
> meal had a notorious nickname. -aem
>


which was?

--

saerah

http://anisaerah.blogspot.com/

"Peace is not an absence of war, it is a virtue, a state of mind, a
disposition for benevolence, confidence, justice."
-Baruch Spinoza

"There is a theory which states that if ever anybody discovers exactly
what the Universe is for and why it is here, it will instantly disappear
and be replaced by something even more bizarre and inexplicable. There
is another theory which states that this has already happened."
-Douglas Adams
  #248 (permalink)   Report Post  
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aem
 
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sarah bennett wrote:
> aem wrote:
> Same reason that
> > meal had a notorious nickname. -aem
> >

>
> which was?
>

Closest I can come in mixed company is, "ham and mo-fo's". -aem

  #249 (permalink)   Report Post  
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sarah bennett
 
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aem wrote:
> sarah bennett wrote:
>
>>aem wrote:
>> Same reason that
>>
>>>meal had a notorious nickname. -aem
>>>

>>
>>which was?
>>

>
> Closest I can come in mixed company is, "ham and mo-fo's". -aem
>


I found a few things on google, but wasn't sure it was the right one

--

saerah

http://anisaerah.blogspot.com/

"Peace is not an absence of war, it is a virtue, a state of mind, a
disposition for benevolence, confidence, justice."
-Baruch Spinoza

"There is a theory which states that if ever anybody discovers exactly
what the Universe is for and why it is here, it will instantly disappear
and be replaced by something even more bizarre and inexplicable. There
is another theory which states that this has already happened."
-Douglas Adams
  #250 (permalink)   Report Post  
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Nancy Young
 
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"sarah bennett" > wrote

> aem wrote:


>> Me, too. There's a reason the ham and lima beans meal in a case of
>> C-rations was always the last to go (unless your unit had troops from
>> South Carolina -- for some reason they liked 'em). Same reason that
>> meal had a notorious nickname.


> which was?


(laugh) I wondered as well, figured it's not fit for print.

I like lima beans well enough, but I can see why people wouldn't.
Probably those people who think refried beans are good.

nancy




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sarah bennett
 
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Nancy Young wrote:
> "sarah bennett" > wrote
>
>
>>aem wrote:

>
>
>>>Me, too. There's a reason the ham and lima beans meal in a case of
>>>C-rations was always the last to go (unless your unit had troops from
>>>South Carolina -- for some reason they liked 'em). Same reason that
>>>meal had a notorious nickname.

>
>
>>which was?

>
>
> (laugh) I wondered as well, figured it's not fit for print.
>
> I like lima beans well enough, but I can see why people wouldn't.
> Probably those people who think refried beans are good.
>
> nancy
>
>


heh. I like frijoles refritos, but the limas stay uneaten on my plate

--

saerah

http://anisaerah.blogspot.com/

"Peace is not an absence of war, it is a virtue, a state of mind, a
disposition for benevolence, confidence, justice."
-Baruch Spinoza

"There is a theory which states that if ever anybody discovers exactly
what the Universe is for and why it is here, it will instantly disappear
and be replaced by something even more bizarre and inexplicable. There
is another theory which states that this has already happened."
-Douglas Adams
  #252 (permalink)   Report Post  
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Elaine Parrish
 
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On Tue, 17 Jan 2006, The Bubbo wrote:
k> >
>
> wow, i'd never heard of that before. I wouldn't eat it myself, but I guess if
> it makes money then the guy's got a solid business plan.
>
> Does it look raw?
>
> --
> .:Heather:.
> www.velvet-c.com
> Step off, beyotches, I'm the roflpimp!
>


That's the thing. I didn't know. I wasn't eating it and I couldn't tell by
looking at it if it was raw or not - except for the shrimp. Shrimp was the
only thing on her plate that I had ever cooked.

Elaine, too

  #253 (permalink)   Report Post  
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Elaine Parrish
 
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On Tue, 17 Jan 2006, sf wrote:

> On Mon, 16 Jan 2006 23:39:11 -0600, Elaine Parrish wrote:
>
> > [Sorry, but I still don't get Thai Tea.]

>
> Ohmygod! Hush your mouff. I overdose on it whenever I get the
> chance.
> --
>
> Practice safe eating. Always use condiments.
>


ROTF!

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Hah hahaha haha DOUBLE ROTFLMAO!!!!

http://www.iamfood.com

  #255 (permalink)   Report Post  
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Elaine Parrish
 
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On Tue, 17 Jan 2006, sf wrote:

> On Tue, 17 Jan 2006 00:18:06 -0600, Elaine Parrish wrote:
> >
> > I love lima beans. They are my favs. I only like fresh or frozen. I can
> > tolerate canned in veggie soup, but not to eat.
> >
> > I like them gently boiled until they are soft - with butter or bacon
> > drippins - but I also like them simmered until the water thickens with the
> > bean starch, but not until they are dry.
> >


> OK, now you're being weird... first you don't "get" Thai tea and now
> you like lima beans. Odd, very very odd. LOL
>
>
> Practice safe eating. Always use condiments.
>


hahaha! I try not to argue against the truth!






  #256 (permalink)   Report Post  
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Jen
 
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she decided to go back to her old occupation that put her through
nursing school, waitressing. She doubled her net pay the first year
and cut the stress factor to near zero. Lung Guyland has tons of very
fine restaurants, prices are high with tipping to match. No, you are
not going to earn a whole lot waiting tables at some family style
chain, and certainly not running meat loaf and pork chops at the local
greazy spoon diner... but at the better caliber restaurants a wait
person who knows their potatoes and is willing to hustle butt can earn
a remarkable amount of money.


It seems wrong to me that a waitress should be able to get more money than a
nurse!! Here the more expensive restaurants can pay a lot more to their
staff for good workers, but anybody working, even if they're not good at it,
would receive the minimum wage, they probably won't stay at it though -
people who are rude probably don't like their job anyway. People who are
good at what they do are the ones getting the jobs.

Jen


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Christine Dabney
 
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On Fri, 20 Jan 2006 05:42:45 GMT, "Jen" >
wrote:

>It seems wrong to me that a waitress should be able to get more money than a
>nurse!! Here the more expensive restaurants can pay a lot more to their
>staff for good workers, but anybody working, even if they're not good at it,
>would receive the minimum wage, they probably won't stay at it though -
>people who are rude probably don't like their job anyway. People who are
>good at what they do are the ones getting the jobs.


A lot of less highly skilled people get paid more than nurses. Nurses
salaries are not going up in a lot of places, and in some states,
there are state Hospital associations that have a cap on nurse's
salaries. And in the South, and some of the Plains states, nurses
salaries are abysmal, especially for the amount of responsibility that
a nurse has. Plus, as Sheldon so correctly said, the amount of abuse
we take from doctors, etc. And folks wonder why there is a nursing
shortage?

Christine, RN
  #258 (permalink)   Report Post  
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Elaine Parrish
 
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On Mon, 16 Jan 2006, sarah bennett wrote:
> >
> > As far as bottled water, there is a lot of controversy as to whether
> > some bottled water is just tap water, at least some brands. And some
> > tap waters are absolutely horrible as far as what is in them.
> >
> > Christine

>
> I would venture to say that most bottled waters are just filtered tap
> water.
>
> --
>
> saerah



I tend to agree. I figure it is boiled, too. My tap water tastes better
when I boil it. I've seen a lot of water from underground springs and
pools. Much of it needs to be filtered. If water can get to the surface,
surface crud can get to the water. If snow and rain falling out of the sky
are contaminated, their disappearing back into the ground is taking a lot
of stuff with them.

Interestingly, I have known several people that would drink only certain
brands of bottled water. When they came to my own house they brought their
water with them (I mark that as considerate), however, in my home or in
their own, they filled their glasses with ice from the ice maker and then
poured their bottled water over it. What is it that they think they have -
especially in 15 or 20 minutes?

These same folks didn't shy away from my homemade veggie soup, jello,
boiled potatoes and other boiled veggies, fresh salad fixings, fresh
fruit, etc. made with (or washed in).... yep, tap water. They eat with
forks and spoons washed in tap water out of platesThey washed
their hands in tap
water before eating raw veggies or bread or fixing salad with their
bare, tap water coated hands.

Oh, well. Live and let live

Elaine, too

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Elaine Parrish
 
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On Wed, 18 Jan 2006, Nathalie Chiva wrote:


>
> I assure you that when I eat sushi, the fish is raw, except for the
> shrimp. The restaurant ypou went to obviously doesn't want to deal
> with raw fish (has to be fresh of the day etc.) and does what my local
> supermarket does, serves "cooked fish sushi" (an oxymoron IMO).
>
> Nathalie in Switzerland
>
>


I think you are exactly right. We are not anywhere near a proper body of
water for fresh fish of this kind (or any kind, save catfish or crappie)
or even a supplier that delivers fresh fish. I don't even know of a
restaurant that serves fresh fish here.

I don't know much about raw fish, but I would think the liability to a
restaurant would increase dramatically over serving cooked fish. In a
small town like this they couldn't possibly sell enough on any one given
day to use all the fish fresh that they would need to have on hand - even
if they could get fresh fish.

I don't know if it was steamed, blanched, poached, or something else. I
saw Emeril "cook" some fish by making a marinade (with lemon juice?) and
just soaking it for a few minutes. It still looked "raw", but he kept
saying, "see how it is cooking?" Then he served it in some dish he had
billed as "raw" something or other. So, apparently, it was raw, but it was
cooked. Does that make sense? So maybe they aren't "cooking" it, but just
soaking it in something.

I really don't know. I wasn't eating it and didn't plan to, so I wasn't
real inquisitive. I tasted the shrimp one and the California Roll, but
didn't care for the clump of cold rice or the wasabi.

Elaine, too

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Dee Randall
 
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"Christine Dabney" > wrote in message
...
> On Fri, 20 Jan 2006 05:42:45 GMT, "Jen" >
> wrote:
>
>>It seems wrong to me that a waitress should be able to get more money than
>>a
>>nurse!! Here the more expensive restaurants can pay a lot more to their
>>staff for good workers, but anybody working, even if they're not good at
>>it,
>>would receive the minimum wage, they probably won't stay at it though -
>>people who are rude probably don't like their job anyway. People who are
>>good at what they do are the ones getting the jobs.

>
> A lot of less highly skilled people get paid more than nurses. Nurses
> salaries are not going up in a lot of places, and in some states,
> there are state Hospital associations that have a cap on nurse's
> salaries. And in the South, and some of the Plains states, nurses
> salaries are abysmal, especially for the amount of responsibility that
> a nurse has. Plus, as Sheldon so correctly said, the amount of abuse
> we take from doctors, etc. And folks wonder why there is a nursing
> shortage?
>
> Christine, RN


Payscale of RN's in U.S.
http://www.payscale.com/salary-surve...LARY/fid-6886/

Payscale of RN's in Canada
http://www.payscale.com/salary-surve...LARY/fid-7031/

Dee Dee




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Dee Randall
 
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"Elaine Parrish" > wrote in message
...
>
> On Mon, 16 Jan 2006, sarah bennett wrote:
>> >
>> > As far as bottled water, there is a lot of controversy as to whether
>> > some bottled water is just tap water, at least some brands. And some
>> > tap waters are absolutely horrible as far as what is in them.
>> >
>> > Christine

>>
>> I would venture to say that most bottled waters are just filtered tap
>> water.
>>
>> --
>>
>> saerah

>
>
> I tend to agree. I figure it is boiled, too. My tap water tastes better
> when I boil it. I've seen a lot of water from underground springs and
> pools. Much of it needs to be filtered.


If water can get to the surface,
> surface crud can get to the water. If snow and rain falling out of the sky
> are contaminated, their disappearing back into the ground is taking a lot
> of stuff with them.


From what I understand, the earth (rocks) is a great filtration system for
the contaminated water that has come from the contaminated. When we bring
it to the earth again, it comes thru pipes, that hopefully are not too
contaminated.

Dee Dee



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Bob Terwilliger
 
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Elaine replied to Nathalie:

>> "cooked fish sushi" (an oxymoron IMO).


The term "sushi" refers to the rice, not to what's on it. Eel sushi is
cooked, but it's still sushi.

<snip>
> I don't know if it was steamed, blanched, poached, or something else. I
> saw Emeril "cook" some fish by making a marinade (with lemon juice?) and
> just soaking it for a few minutes. It still looked "raw", but he kept
> saying, "see how it is cooking?" Then he served it in some dish he had
> billed as "raw" something or other. So, apparently, it was raw, but it was
> cooked. Does that make sense? So maybe they aren't "cooking" it, but just
> soaking it in something.


You're talking about seviche. We've discussed it here many times. When fish
is soaked in an acidic solution, the proteins change in the same way as if
the fish was cooked. It's a very common preparation in Latin American and
Caribbean cuisines.


> I really don't know. I wasn't eating it and didn't plan to, so I wasn't
> real inquisitive. I tasted the shrimp one and the California Roll, but
> didn't care for the clump of cold rice or the wasabi.


The "clump of cold rice" is what MAKES it sushi. If all you want is the
other stuff without the rice, don't ask for sushi.

Bob


  #263 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
Elaine Parrish
 
Posts: n/a
Default Fussy Eaters


On Wed, 18 Jan 2006, jmcquown wrote:

> sf wrote:
> > On Tue, 17 Jan 2006 00:18:06 -0600, Elaine Parrish wrote:
> >>
> >> I love lima beans. They are my favs. I only like fresh or frozen. I
> >> can tolerate canned in veggie soup, but not to eat.
> >>
> >> I like them gently boiled until they are soft - with butter or bacon
> >> drippins - but I also like them simmered until the water thickens
> >> with the bean starch, but not until they are dry.
> >>

> > OK, now you're being weird... first you don't "get" Thai tea and now
> > you like lima beans. Odd, very very odd. LOL

>
> I don't "get" people who don't like lima beans! I love them. But like
> Elaine, they have to be fresh or frozen. Since I can't find fresh hulled
> limas I prefer the big frozen Fordhook ones. They sort of "burst" in your
> mouth when you bite into them Add some butter, a little thyme, salt &
> pepper - they are great!
>
> I do "get" Thai tea, at least Thai iced tea. I just don't care much for
> tea.
>
> Jill


Oh, yeah, Fordhooks. That pop is just wonderful. The tiny, tiny baby limas
will do that too, if cooked just right. It's harder to get them at the
exact stage in cooking. I usually cook them beyond that. I guess because
they are different sizes even when small, it's harder to get them
"pop-able".

I love butter peas, too.

Now about that Thai tea... 'Round here Iced Sweetea is a religion <g>. So,
when anybody goes around tampering with it, it's a sin to our taste buds
haha.

Elaine, too

  #264 (permalink)   Report Post  
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-L.
 
Posts: n/a
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Michael Siemon wrote:
> It is also, if well done, so damned "pretty" that I can hardly imagine
> even the most squeamish of fellow diners having any problem watching
> me eat the raw stuff, even if they demur on having it themselves!


It *is* quite pretty. That's about all I like about it. Honestly, I
don't "get" what the big deal is. I think a lot of people who ooh and
aaahh over it simply do so because it's trendy.

>
> What do such folks do when their fellow diners order oysters on the
> half-shell as an appetizer? Do they go all green, or just look the
> other way if it bothers them?


I don't generally dine with people who eat oysters on the half-shell.
Actually the only person I ever have dined with who did was my father
and he's been dead...22 years. There are so many other wonderful
things to eat while visiting the E. coast, I can't imagine any reason
why I would want to eat a slimy, nasty raw oyster.

I live in the land of salmon,. trout and halibut. Can't ask for more
than that.
-L.

  #265 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
Elaine Parrish
 
Posts: n/a
Default Fussy Eaters


On 18 Jan 2006, Sheldon wrote:

>
> jmcquown wrote:
> > sf wrote:
> > > Elaine Parrish wrote:
> > >>
> > >> I love lima beans. They are my favs. I only like fresh or frozen. I
> > >> can tolerate canned in veggie soup, but not to eat.
> > >>
> > >> I like them gently boiled until they are soft - with butter or bacon
> > >> drippins - but I also like them simmered until the water thickens
> > >> with the bean starch, but not until they are dry.
> > >>
> > > OK, now you're being weird... first you don't "get" Thai tea and now
> > > you like lima beans. Odd, very very odd. LOL

> >
> > I don't "get" people who don't like lima beans! I love them. But like
> > Elaine, they have to be fresh or frozen.



>
> What's wrong with dried... they're wonderful for soup... you're the big
> soup maven...
>


I don't know that I ever bought dried limas. I don't remember seeing
them in the store. I'll have to look for them. I've bought dried butter
beans, though.

I don't like dried butter beans and I probably wouldn't like dried limas
for the same reason. Butter beans don't reconstitute well. The outter
casing "pops" open and the soft insides disintegrate. I don't like them
for a side dish or for soups.

Elaine, too



  #266 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
Melba's Jammin'
 
Posts: n/a
Default Fussy Eaters

In article >,
"Nancy Young" > wrote:
(snipped)
> >> South Carolina -- for some reason they liked 'em). Same reason that
> >> meal had a notorious nickname.

>
> > which was?

>
> (laugh) I wondered as well, figured it's not fit for print.


When has that ever stopped anything?
>

--
http://www.jamlady.eboard.com, updated 1-15-2006, RIP Connie Drew
  #267 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
Nancy Young
 
Posts: n/a
Default Fussy Eaters


"Melba's Jammin'" > wrote

> "Nancy Young" > wrote:
> (snipped)
>> >> South Carolina -- for some reason they liked 'em). Same reason that
>> >> meal had a notorious nickname.

>>
>> > which was?

>>
>> (laugh) I wondered as well, figured it's not fit for print.

>
> When has that ever stopped anything?


aem seems like a classier type than some of us. Probably a
front.

nancy


  #268 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
Roberta
 
Posts: n/a
Default Fussy Eaters

Dee Randall wrote:
> "Christine Dabney" > wrote in message
> ...
>
>>On Fri, 20 Jan 2006 05:42:45 GMT, "Jen" >
>>wrote:
>>
>>
>>>It seems wrong to me that a waitress should be able to get more money than
>>>a
>>>nurse!! Here the more expensive restaurants can pay a lot more to their
>>>staff for good workers, but anybody working, even if they're not good at
>>>it,
>>>would receive the minimum wage, they probably won't stay at it though -
>>>people who are rude probably don't like their job anyway. People who are
>>>good at what they do are the ones getting the jobs.

>>
>>A lot of less highly skilled people get paid more than nurses. Nurses
>>salaries are not going up in a lot of places, and in some states,
>>there are state Hospital associations that have a cap on nurse's
>>salaries. And in the South, and some of the Plains states, nurses
>>salaries are abysmal, especially for the amount of responsibility that
>>a nurse has. Plus, as Sheldon so correctly said, the amount of abuse
>>we take from doctors, etc. And folks wonder why there is a nursing
>>shortage?
>>
>>Christine, RN

>
>
> Payscale of RN's in U.S.
> http://www.payscale.com/salary-surve...LARY/fid-6886/
>
> Payscale of RN's in Canada
> http://www.payscale.com/salary-surve...LARY/fid-7031/
>
> Dee Dee
>
>


I really think it depends on where you work (both location in the
country and type of office/place you work). I have a friend that is an
OR nurse...we lived in Athens, GA and she made $27.00 an hour - she
moved to D.C. and all I know is she says she is embarrassed to say how
much she makes....

I worked in a Doctor's office in a small town in GA - the one nurse
there made between $9-$10/hour...just depends on where you are. If she
had wanted to drive an hour each way she could have doubled her wage.

Roberta (in VA)
  #269 (permalink)   Report Post  
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Glitter Ninja
 
Posts: n/a
Default Fussy Eaters

Elaine Parrish > writes:

>water with them (I mark that as considerate), however, in my home or in
>their own, they filled their glasses with ice from the ice maker and then
>poured their bottled water over it. What is it that they think they have -


That's weird. Seriously weird. When we lived in a house in the old
part of town, the water was so bad we had to buy filtered water from the
grocery store, and we filled our ice cube trays with the filtered
store-bought water. You could tell if you froze the tap water (usually
because of the chunks in it. Ew.) My job was in the old part of town,
too, and I got sick one day drinking too much water from the water
fountain.
I suspect for those who use both bottled and tap, it's preference and
not necessity. I fully admit that I prefer bottled in many situations,
even if it's just filtered tap water and nothing special, because
getting ill on crappy water was a terrible feeling I don't want to
repeat.

Stacia


  #270 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
Sheldon
 
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Default Fussy Eaters


Dave Smith wrote:
>
> I have been to places in US and Canada where tips are expected and service was
> slow, sloppy and sometimes rude. I have been to places in Europe where tips
> are not expected, service usually being included in the price, and the service
> was excellent. So many of us are so intimidated about tipping that we leave
> at least 15% even if service was rotten, more if it was acceptable. In those
> parts of Europe where service is included, it is still in the waiter's
> interest to bring food quickly and to push more food and drink sales. I just
> don't buy the argument that tipping ensures better service.


At bottom of the barrel greasy spoons and chains, at places where help
turns over like flapjacks, you're correct. I don't call those
restaurants... those are essentially snackbars, a wee step up from the
hotdog cart... no one dines at IHOP, TGIF, Olive Garden, Pizza Hut,
Sizzler and their ilk. But at the quality establishments employees
generally stay for years, they get to know their repeat clientele, they
learn who consistantly tips appropriately and who are the pikers... and
so afford service accordingly. And it's really unjust to judge by the
eateries one encounters on vacation or when traveling in general...
restaurants that cater primarilly to tourists/nomads, regardless where
in the world, are typically the pits in every respect (as are their
patrons)... after all in the vast majority of cases you will never see
each other again, they know it, you know it... no relationship ever
ensues... may as well be dining from a vending machine. Try to
remember, for every lousy waitperson there are hundreds of even lousier
patrons... you deserve each other.

Btw, I can always tell instantly which woman I encounter in NYC who
just arrived from countries where they don't tip... their hairdos
invaribly look like someone missed the bowl with the lawn mower....
just like they do up here in hillybilly land... dykey dos. Folks don't
tip well here in the sticks either, but then again the majority of
restaurants around here are crap and service stinks (literally). The
waitpeople hereabouts dress like they just mucked the barn, smell like
it too.... when you enter a steak house around NY's Capital region you
know with absolute certainty you're in cow country.

Sheldon



  #271 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
Dee Randall
 
Posts: n/a
Default Fussy Eaters


"-L." > wrote in message
oups.com...
>
> Michael Siemon wrote:
>> It is also, if well done, so damned "pretty" that I can hardly imagine
>> even the most squeamish of fellow diners having any problem watching
>> me eat the raw stuff, even if they demur on having it themselves!

>
> It *is* quite pretty. That's about all I like about it. Honestly, I
> don't "get" what the big deal is. I think a lot of people who ooh and
> aaahh over it simply do so because it's trendy.
>


I have a deceased relative who always said that people ate this or that
because it was trendy and ate it with no regard to taste; for instance, that
no one could really tell the difference between jug wine and $50 wine if
they were put to the test; that Long John Silver served fish as good as the
best fish houses, and on-and-on-and on. It didn't take me long to realize
this particular relative, IMO, was just plain CHEAP!
Dee Dee


  #272 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
Dee Randall
 
Posts: n/a
Default Sushi ( Fussy Eaters)

>> I really don't know. I wasn't eating it and didn't plan to, so I wasn't
>> real inquisitive. I tasted the shrimp one and the California Roll, but
>> didn't care for the clump of cold rice or the wasabi.

>
> The "clump of cold rice" is what MAKES it sushi. If all you want is the
> other stuff without the rice, don't ask for sushi.
>
> Bob

Just give me a clump of cold rice, wrapped in nori, topped with wasabi and a
little dip of shoyu and I'm in heaven. If there's a little avocado or
anything else inside, so much the better, but not necessary for my
enjoyment.
Dee Dee


  #273 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
Peter Aitken
 
Posts: n/a
Default Fussy Eaters

"Dee Randall" > wrote in message
...
>
> "-L." > wrote in message
> oups.com...
>>
>> Michael Siemon wrote:
>>> It is also, if well done, so damned "pretty" that I can hardly imagine
>>> even the most squeamish of fellow diners having any problem watching
>>> me eat the raw stuff, even if they demur on having it themselves!

>>
>> It *is* quite pretty. That's about all I like about it. Honestly, I
>> don't "get" what the big deal is. I think a lot of people who ooh and
>> aaahh over it simply do so because it's trendy.
>>

>
> I have a deceased relative who always said that people ate this or that
> because it was trendy and ate it with no regard to taste; for instance,
> that no one could really tell the difference between jug wine and $50 wine
> if they were put to the test; that Long John Silver served fish as good as
> the best fish houses, and on-and-on-and on. It didn't take me long to
> realize this particular relative, IMO, was just plain CHEAP!
> Dee Dee
>


There are people who really can't tell the difference. Rather than admit it,
they claim that people who can tell the difference are just being trendy.


--
Peter Aitken
Visit my recipe and kitchen myths page at www.pgacon.com/cooking.htm


  #274 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
sarah bennett
 
Posts: n/a
Default Fussy Eaters

Peter Aitken wrote:
> "Dee Randall" > wrote in message
> ...
>
>>"-L." > wrote in message
groups.com...
>>
>>>Michael Siemon wrote:
>>>
>>>>It is also, if well done, so damned "pretty" that I can hardly imagine
>>>>even the most squeamish of fellow diners having any problem watching
>>>>me eat the raw stuff, even if they demur on having it themselves!
>>>
>>>It *is* quite pretty. That's about all I like about it. Honestly, I
>>>don't "get" what the big deal is. I think a lot of people who ooh and
>>>aaahh over it simply do so because it's trendy.
>>>

>>
>>I have a deceased relative who always said that people ate this or that
>>because it was trendy and ate it with no regard to taste; for instance,
>>that no one could really tell the difference between jug wine and $50 wine
>>if they were put to the test; that Long John Silver served fish as good as
>>the best fish houses, and on-and-on-and on. It didn't take me long to
>>realize this particular relative, IMO, was just plain CHEAP!
>>Dee Dee
>>

>
>
> There are people who really can't tell the difference. Rather than admit it,
> they claim that people who can tell the difference are just being trendy.
>
>


OTOH, I know many many people who will not buy store brands, citing
quality as the reason. In my experience (and I *can* tell the difference
between quality products and crap), most store brand ingredients that
are not highly processed (i.e. canned tomatoes, eggs, kraft-level
cheddar cheese, pasta) taste no different from the low-to mid priced
national brands that most people purchase.

--

saerah

http://anisaerah.blogspot.com/

"Peace is not an absence of war, it is a virtue, a state of mind, a
disposition for benevolence, confidence, justice."
-Baruch Spinoza

"There is a theory which states that if ever anybody discovers exactly
what the Universe is for and why it is here, it will instantly disappear
and be replaced by something even more bizarre and inexplicable. There
is another theory which states that this has already happened."
-Douglas Adams
  #275 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
Sheldon
 
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Default Fussy Eaters


sarah bennett wrote:
>
> I would venture to say that most bottled waters are just filtered tap
> water.


It "all* comes directly from a local municipal water tap... not even
filtered except to remove the chlorine and flouride (yoose really
shouldn't be permitting your children to drink bottled water, their
teeth will suffer). Do yoose really think water is imported... sure it
came from a glacier, artesian well, or mountain spring, at one time or
another *all* water passed through that way... all the water on the
planet today is the same water that was formed when the planet was
formed, and *all* water is in a constant state of flux. When you pay
for bottled water you are paying for transportation, advertising,
labeling, and of course bottles and bottling. Those of yoose consuming
water from your own private well really need to speak with your dentist
about floride treatments, especially for your children.... that's the
main reason so many up here in the NY boonies have such horribly rotten
teeth, that and they don't brush... most have never been to a dentist.
Swishing your teeth with booze is not a caries/tartar preventitive
recognized by the ADA.



  #276 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
Dee Randall
 
Posts: n/a
Default Fussy Eaters


"Peter Aitken" > wrote in message
...
> "Dee Randall" > wrote in message
> ...
>>
>> "-L." > wrote in message
>> oups.com...
>>>
>>> Michael Siemon wrote:
>>>> It is also, if well done, so damned "pretty" that I can hardly imagine
>>>> even the most squeamish of fellow diners having any problem watching
>>>> me eat the raw stuff, even if they demur on having it themselves!
>>>
>>> It *is* quite pretty. That's about all I like about it. Honestly, I
>>> don't "get" what the big deal is. I think a lot of people who ooh and
>>> aaahh over it simply do so because it's trendy.
>>>

>>
>> I have a deceased relative who always said that people ate this or that
>> because it was trendy and ate it with no regard to taste; for instance,
>> that no one could really tell the difference between jug wine and $50
>> wine if they were put to the test; that Long John Silver served fish as
>> good as the best fish houses, and on-and-on-and on. It didn't take me
>> long to realize this particular relative, IMO, was just plain CHEAP!
>> Dee Dee
>>

>
> There are people who really can't tell the difference. Rather than admit
> it, they claim that people who can tell the difference are just being
> trendy.
>
>
> --
> Peter Aitken


You drive home a good idea. So Pity the person who doesn't appreciate the
vive-la-difference; just think, Poor Soul.
Dee Dee


  #277 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
Dee Randall
 
Posts: n/a
Default Fussy Eaters


"Glitter Ninja" > wrote in message
...
> Elaine Parrish > writes:
>
>>water with them (I mark that as considerate), however, in my home or in
>>their own, they filled their glasses with ice from the ice maker and then
>>poured their bottled water over it. What is it that they think they have -

>
> That's weird. Seriously weird. When we lived in a house in the old
> part of town, the water was so bad we had to buy filtered water from the
> grocery store, and we filled our ice cube trays with the filtered
> store-bought water. You could tell if you froze the tap water (usually
> because of the chunks in it. Ew.) My job was in the old part of town,
> too, and I got sick one day drinking too much water from the water
> fountain.
> I suspect for those who use both bottled and tap, it's preference and
> not necessity. I fully admit that I prefer bottled in many situations,
> even if it's just filtered tap water and nothing special, because
> getting ill on crappy water was a terrible feeling I don't want to
> repeat.
>
> Stacia
>

Living one place (where I won't mention) and we were on the local water, we
had brown chunks in our water. When I called, they said it was dried
leaves, not to worry.
Yeah, right!
Dee Dee


  #278 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
Dave Smith
 
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Default Fussy Eaters

sarah bennett wrote:

> OTOH, I know many many people who will not buy store brands, citing
> quality as the reason. In my experience (and I *can* tell the difference
> between quality products and crap), most store brand ingredients that
> are not highly processed (i.e. canned tomatoes, eggs, kraft-level
> cheddar cheese, pasta) taste no different from the low-to mid priced
> national brands that most people purchase.


There may have been a bigger difference between brands when there were more
different companies in the game. There used to be a lot more canneries in this
area than there are now, each canning under their own label. Now there are two
canneries. One day they will be canning and sticking one company's label on the
cans and the next day they will be canning the same crop and sticking another
company's label on the cans.


  #279 (permalink)   Report Post  
Posted to rec.food.cooking
OmManiPadmeOmelet
 
Posts: n/a
Default Sushi ( Fussy Eaters)

In article >,
"Bob Terwilliger" > wrote:
> Elaine replied to Nathalie:
>
> >> "cooked fish sushi" (an oxymoron IMO).

>
> The term "sushi" refers to the rice, not to what's on it. Eel sushi is
> cooked, but it's still sushi.
>
> <snip>
> > I don't know if it was steamed, blanched, poached, or something else. I
> > saw Emeril "cook" some fish by making a marinade (with lemon juice?) and
> > just soaking it for a few minutes. It still looked "raw", but he kept
> > saying, "see how it is cooking?" Then he served it in some dish he had
> > billed as "raw" something or other. So, apparently, it was raw, but it was
> > cooked. Does that make sense? So maybe they aren't "cooking" it, but just
> > soaking it in something.

>
> You're talking about seviche. We've discussed it here many times. When fish
> is soaked in an acidic solution, the proteins change in the same way as if
> the fish was cooked. It's a very common preparation in Latin American and
> Caribbean cuisines.
>
>
> > I really don't know. I wasn't eating it and didn't plan to, so I wasn't
> > real inquisitive. I tasted the shrimp one and the California Roll, but
> > didn't care for the clump of cold rice or the wasabi.

>
> The "clump of cold rice" is what MAKES it sushi. If all you want is the
> other stuff without the rice, don't ask for sushi.
>
> Bob
>
>


Ask for Sashimi. ;-)

It's even MORE expensive!!!
--
Om.

"My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
  #280 (permalink)   Report Post  
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jmcquown
 
Posts: n/a
Default Fussy Eaters

Sheldon wrote:
> jmcquown wrote:
>> sf wrote:
>>> Elaine Parrish wrote:
>>>>
>>>> I love lima beans. They are my favs. I only like fresh or frozen.
>>>> I can tolerate canned in veggie soup, but not to eat.
>>>>
>>>> I like them gently boiled until they are soft - with butter or
>>>> bacon drippins - but I also like them simmered until the water
>>>> thickens with the bean starch, but not until they are dry.
>>>>
>>> OK, now you're being weird... first you don't "get" Thai tea and now
>>> you like lima beans. Odd, very very odd. LOL

>>
>> I don't "get" people who don't like lima beans! I love them.
>> But like Elaine, they have to be fresh or frozen.

>
> What's wrong with dried... they're wonderful for soup... you're the
> big soup maven...


Oh, I was talking about eating lima beans as a veggie side dish. I *have*
used dried limas in soups. In fact, they make for a very nice vegetarian
soup (if you like limas). Here's a fly-by-the-seat method. Soak the beans,
then use vegetable broth or a combination of water and vegetable stock, 8-10
cups for a pound of soaked limas. Throw in some dried thyme, a couple of
bay leaves. Saute some onion, garlic and shredded carrots in butter. Add
to the beans. Simmer an hour or so. Mash some of the beans to thicken the
soup. Add salt & pepper to taste, then simmer another 30 minutes.

Jill


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