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S'mee
 
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One time on Usenet, Wayne Boatwright > said:
> On Sat 14 Jan 2006 10:58:56a, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it S'mee?


> > Now I'm sure at least 10 people are queuing up to tell me I should
> > make him eat it anyway, because they certainly wouldn't put up with
> > that. But I'm more interested in knowing what kind of fussiness
> > the rest of you may have to deal with...


> To make a list of what David won't eat would be exhaustive. Vegetables -
> he will only eat peas (canned), carrots, corn, and potatoes. Salads are
> out of the question. Meats - he will only eat a few cuts of beef, pork, or
> chicken, and none of them can be cuts that either contain bone or are on a
> bone. He will not eat any form of fish or seafood. Fruits - he will only
> eat bananas, grapes, applesauce, and orange juice. Breads - he will only
> eat soft white or sourdough, and nothing that contains seeds or other
> additives with texture. He will eat smooth peanut butter and jelly, but
> not jam or preserves. Desserts, if they are chocolage and do not contain
> nuts. That's about it.


Oh my!

> Needless to say, I cook many separate meals for the two of us. I simply
> could not exist on that. In 14 years, I have managed to add perhaps 2 items
> to his diet that he would not eat before.


Okay Wayne, I think you've taken the prize for most fussy family
member... :-)


--
Jani in WA (S'mee)
~ mom, Trollop, novice cook ~
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S'mee
 
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One time on Usenet, Dave Smith > said:
> S'mee wrote:
>
> >
> > Now I'm sure at least 10 people are queuing up to tell me I should
> > make him eat it anyway, because they certainly wouldn't put up with
> > that. But I'm more interested in knowing what kind of fussiness
> > the rest of you may have to deal with...

>
> We are pretty lucky in my family. My wife has a thing about beets and is
> not to crazy about lima beans,


Boy, lot's of folks fussy about lima bean in this thread. I used
to hate them, but one day I accidentally left some on the stove
too long, in a nice butter sauce. The sauce had reduced to a nice
glaze(?), and made the limas actually taste good.

> but will eat just about anything. My son is
> pretty adventurous. The only one in the family who is a PITA is my older
> brother's oldest son. It's bad enough that he has so many dislikes, but he
> pouts about the lack of options. He was here for Christmas dinner two
> years ago. We had Carrot Pudding with caramel sauce, mince meat tarts,
> butter tarts, shortbread, Nanaimo bars, Black Forest squares, brownies and
> a few other types of cookies and he started with the there's nothing good
> for dessert. I think he was expecting me to go out and root through the
> freezer and cupboards for him..... tough luck kid :-)


Oh man, if it weren't for my blood sugar, I'd be coming to your place
next Christmas, Dave. I'm sorry, but your nephew is nuts... ;-)


--
Jani in WA (S'mee)
~ mom, Trollop, novice cook ~
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S'mee
 
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One time on Usenet, group said:

<snip>

> I do keep recipes that are not in favor at the moment--there's always
> some potluck or another coming up that I can make it for.


What a brilliant idea! Thanks, Maxine...


--
Jani in WA (S'mee)
~ mom, Trollop, novice cook ~
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S'mee
 
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One time on Usenet, notbob > said:
> On 2006-01-14, S'mee > wrote:


> > I was checking out Gloria's Sweet & Sour Cocktail Meatball recipe

>
> Hah!.... When I first glanced at the subject, I though it said
> something else.


You're the second person (at least via my newsfeed) to say that. I
gotta watch my subject headers a bit more closely... ;-)


--
Jani in WA (S'mee)
~ mom, Trollop, novice cook ~
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Bob Terwilliger
 
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Jani wrote:

> I was checking out Gloria's Sweet & Sour Cocktail Meatball recipe
> (which sounds excellent, btw; my sibling makes something very similar).
> Anyway, I figured I wouldn't bother to save the recipe because Miguel
> (DH) doesn't like meatballs of any kind. Or white sauce. Or coconut.
> Or most sandwiches. *Sigh*
>
> Now I'm sure at least 10 people are queuing up to tell me I should
> make him eat it anyway, because they certainly wouldn't put up with
> that. But I'm more interested in knowing what kind of fussiness
> the rest of you may have to deal with...


My girlfriend insists that she isn't fussy. I think she is. Here's the list
of things she won't eat: okra, walnuts, pecans, pistachios, any kind of
squash, any Indian or Asian food (except Japanese; for some reason Japanese
food is "acceptable." But Chinese, Thai, Korean, and Vietnamese foods are
rejected out of hand.), oysters, brussels sprouts, chicken, spicy foods,
cucumbers, and bacon. Oh, and she doesn't like anything to be "too French,"
whatever that means.


Bob




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Wayne Boatwright
 
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On Sat 14 Jan 2006 06:21:23p, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it S'mee?

> One time on Usenet, Wayne Boatwright >
> said:
>> On Sat 14 Jan 2006 10:58:56a, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it S'mee?

>
>> > Now I'm sure at least 10 people are queuing up to tell me I should
>> > make him eat it anyway, because they certainly wouldn't put up with
>> > that. But I'm more interested in knowing what kind of fussiness the
>> > rest of you may have to deal with...

>
>> To make a list of what David won't eat would be exhaustive. Vegetables
>> - he will only eat peas (canned), carrots, corn, and potatoes. Salads
>> are out of the question. Meats - he will only eat a few cuts of beef,
>> pork, or chicken, and none of them can be cuts that either contain bone
>> or are on a bone. He will not eat any form of fish or seafood. Fruits
>> - he will only eat bananas, grapes, applesauce, and orange juice.
>> Breads - he will only eat soft white or sourdough, and nothing that
>> contains seeds or other additives with texture. He will eat smooth
>> peanut butter and jelly, but not jam or preserves. Desserts, if they
>> are chocolage and do not contain nuts. That's about it.

>
> Oh my!
>
>> Needless to say, I cook many separate meals for the two of us. I
>> simply could not exist on that. In 14 years, I have managed to add
>> perhaps 2 items to his diet that he would not eat before.

>
> Okay Wayne, I think you've taken the prize for most fussy family
> member... :-)


hehehe! Other than strict vegetarians, which I personally find difficult
to cook for since I'm not one, he takes the cake! (that would be chocolate
cake) <g>

--
Wayne Boatwright **
__________________________________________________ ________________
And if we enter a room full of manure, may we believe in the pony.


Remove all "xxx's" from address to e-mail directly.
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Kathy in NZ
 
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On 14 Jan 2006 21:08:51 +0100, Wayne Boatwright
> wrote:

>On Sat 14 Jan 2006 10:58:56a, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it S'mee?
>
>> I was checking out Gloria's Sweet & Sour Cocktail Meatball recipe
>> (which sounds excellent, btw; my sibling makes something very similar).
>> Anyway, I figured I wouldn't bother to save the recipe because Miguel
>> (DH) doesn't like meatballs of any kind. Or white sauce. Or coconut.
>> Or most sandwiches. *Sigh*
>>
>> Now I'm sure at least 10 people are queuing up to tell me I should
>> make him eat it anyway, because they certainly wouldn't put up with
>> that. But I'm more interested in knowing what kind of fussiness
>> the rest of you may have to deal with...

>
>To make a list of what David won't eat would be exhaustive. Vegetables -
>he will only eat peas (canned), carrots, corn, and potatoes. Salads are
>out of the question. Meats - he will only eat a few cuts of beef, pork, or
>chicken, and none of them can be cuts that either contain bone or are on a
>bone. He will not eat any form of fish or seafood. Fruits - he will only
>eat bananas, grapes, applesauce, and orange juice. Breads - he will only
>eat soft white or sourdough, and nothing that contains seeds or other
>additives with texture. He will eat smooth peanut butter and jelly, but
>not jam or preserves. Desserts, if they are chocolage and do not contain
>nuts. That's about it.
>
>Needless to say, I cook many separate meals for the two of us. I simply
>could not exist on that. In 14 years, I have managed to add perhaps 2 items
>to his diet that he would not eat before.
>
>--
>Wayne Boatwright **
>_________________________________________________ _________________



Gosh, doesn't it worry you to see he's eating so little fibre?
However, I am the last person to point fingers at fussy eaters. I was
one myself as a child, and there's still a range of things I won't eat
as an adult.

Kathy in NZ
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Wayne Boatwright
 
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On Sat 14 Jan 2006 08:56:19p, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Kathy in
NZ?

> On 14 Jan 2006 21:08:51 +0100, Wayne Boatwright
> > wrote:
>
>>On Sat 14 Jan 2006 10:58:56a, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it S'mee?
>>
>>> I was checking out Gloria's Sweet & Sour Cocktail Meatball recipe
>>> (which sounds excellent, btw; my sibling makes something very
>>> similar). Anyway, I figured I wouldn't bother to save the recipe
>>> because Miguel (DH) doesn't like meatballs of any kind. Or white
>>> sauce. Or coconut. Or most sandwiches. *Sigh*
>>>
>>> Now I'm sure at least 10 people are queuing up to tell me I should
>>> make him eat it anyway, because they certainly wouldn't put up with
>>> that. But I'm more interested in knowing what kind of fussiness the
>>> rest of you may have to deal with...

>>
>>To make a list of what David won't eat would be exhaustive. Vegetables
>>- he will only eat peas (canned), carrots, corn, and potatoes. Salads
>>are out of the question. Meats - he will only eat a few cuts of beef,
>>pork, or chicken, and none of them can be cuts that either contain bone
>>or are on a bone. He will not eat any form of fish or seafood. Fruits
>>- he will only eat bananas, grapes, applesauce, and orange juice.
>>Breads - he will only eat soft white or sourdough, and nothing that
>>contains seeds or other additives with texture. He will eat smooth
>>peanut butter and jelly, but not jam or preserves. Desserts, if they
>>are chocolage and do not contain nuts. That's about it.
>>
>>Needless to say, I cook many separate meals for the two of us. I simply
>>could not exist on that. In 14 years, I have managed to add perhaps 2
>>items to his diet that he would not eat before.
>>
>>--
>>Wayne Boatwright **
>>________________________________________________ __________________

>
>
> Gosh, doesn't it worry you to see he's eating so little fibre?
> However, I am the last person to point fingers at fussy eaters. I was
> one myself as a child, and there's still a range of things I won't eat
> as an adult.
>
> Kathy in NZ
>


It used to bother me, but I have ceased to worry about things I cannot
control or change. It doesn't do my health any good to continuously worry
about it. Basically, I've done what I could, and I do control to a great
extent the quality of foods and elimination of bad foods.

--
Wayne Boatwright **
__________________________________________________ ________________
And if we enter a room full of manure, may we believe in the pony.


Remove all "xxx's" from address to e-mail directly.
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Kathy in NZ
 
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On Sat, 14 Jan 2006 17:58:56 GMT,
(S'mee) wrote:

>I was checking out Gloria's Sweet & Sour Cocktail Meatball recipe
>(which sounds excellent, btw; my sibling makes something very similar).
>Anyway, I figured I wouldn't bother to save the recipe because Miguel
>(DH) doesn't like meatballs of any kind. Or white sauce. Or coconut.
>Or most sandwiches. *Sigh*
>
>Now I'm sure at least 10 people are queuing up to tell me I should
>make him eat it anyway, because they certainly wouldn't put up with
>that. But I'm more interested in knowing what kind of fussiness
>the rest of you may have to deal with...
>
>
>--
> Jani in WA (S'mee)
>~ mom, Trollop, novice cook ~



I've read a pile of comments and sympathise with many of the posters.
However, the parents who insist their kids eat what they're given
bring back bad childhood memories.

I was the youngest of seven kids in a poor family. My mother was a
very good, plain cook. My father was a stern parent who was feared.
Mealtimes were agony for me. I would not eat any vegetables and he
forced me to sit there till I'd cleaned up my plate. Meanwhile, my
siblings would have finished their dessert and left the table while my
main was almost intact. I still remember putting cold mashed potatoes
in my mouth and gagging and crying at the same time. I often left the
table hungry, I often missed out on dessert, and I almost never gave
in. I never ate many different types of veges till I became an adult.
Even then, in some ways I'm still a fussy (but adventurous) eater.

When I had kids I was determined not to make their mealtimes the
misery mine were. I did not altogether succeed. Both were fussy and I
used to get so stressed I'd have stomach pains trying to get them to
eat, while trying not being like my father.

When they were about 7, things resolved themselves. I said there was
no room in a family for more than one fussy eater, and that person was
going to be me, as I was the boss of the kitchen. "When you are the
boss of the kitchen you can choose what you eat," I explained. "But
I'm going to let each of you nominate one food you absolutely hate and
I will never make you eat it. Everything else you have to try."

So they did. And that's what I did. My son never had to eat tomatoes.
My daughter never had to eat pumpkin. But I also went lightly on the
food I knew they did not like.

Footnote: When I eat at my children's houses (they are now 24 and 25
years old) they threaten to serve me mashed potatoes and say I'll have
to eat it as they are the boss of the kitchen!

Kathy in NZ










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i was & am a picky eater, nothing strange like innards, lamb, squid, pig
or chicken feet,

i don't know if it was that my mother made things we liked or we liked
the things she made. however, if she made something one of us didnt like
they didnt have to eat it. my little brother would never touch beet
soup. she'd just give him something else.

as i got older, my tastes expanded as i tried things i saw my friends
enjoying, if it looked good.

no one should be forced to eat things purposely made that is known to be
dislked. its cruel & unusual punishment
;-)
jmho

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Jen
 
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>
> We are pretty lucky in my family. My wife has a thing about beets and is
> not to crazy about lima beans, but will eat just about anything. My son is
> pretty adventurous. The only one in the family who is a PITA is my older
> brother's oldest son. It's bad enough that he has so many dislikes, but he
> pouts about the lack of options. He was here for Christmas dinner two
> years ago. We had Carrot Pudding with caramel sauce,



This is so totally off subject! But Carrot Pudding with caramel sauce!
I've never heard of it. Recipe please.


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Rhonda Anderson
 
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(S'mee) wrote in news:dqbe50$q0k8_002
@news.zipcon.net:

>
> Now I'm sure at least 10 people are queuing up to tell me I should
> make him eat it anyway, because they certainly wouldn't put up with
> that. But I'm more interested in knowing what kind of fussiness
> the rest of you may have to deal with...



I don't eat offal, mushrooms, raw fish or blue vein cheese (though I
haven't tried that for years). Most other things I'll at least try. I
like a wide variety of vegetables and fruits, though of course there are
some I prefer to others, and some I haven't yet tried. I like to try new
things now and again.

Rob is very fussy when it comes to vegies - there are a lot that he won't
eat, and the ones he does eat sometimes have restrictions attached. For
example, he'll eat pumpkin, but only roasted in oil, not steamed or
mashed. When I make salad I like to use baby spinach and mesclun. He only
wants iceberg or cos lettuce.

He will only sometimes eat casserole type dishes where there are vegies
in with the meat. Won't eat stirfries with noodles etc. If I serve pasta
with a tomato sauce, wants to know where the meat is! If I serve meat
with potatoes and green vegies or salad, it's not uncommon that the meat
and potatoes will be eaten and then the green vegies will be "cold" or
he's "too full" to eat them <g>.

I think, if allowed to, he would live quite happily on sausages, salami,
cheese, olives, bread and nuts (lots and lots of nuts), with the
occasional pizza or nachos.

He's not very big on trying new things. Also, frustratingly, sometimes I
make something that he has eaten previously, and he will say that he
doesn't like it or has gone off it.

Oh well, he doesn't drink to excess, gamble, or take up with floozies
<g>.... The vegies I like that he doesn't eat, I just cook for myself.
If he really won't eat what I'm making for tea, he'll make himself a
cheese sandwich or some eggs, but I can usually come to a compromise of
some sort. I just worry about his health when he won't eat much in the
way of fruit and veggies.

Rhonda Anderson
Cranebrook, NSW, Australia


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-L.
 
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Wayne Boatwright wrote:
> Oh, I tried my best to reform him when we were first together. I have to
> admit that he would "try" to eat some of the (quite normal) things he had
> never eaten before, but most of them he simply couldn't abide, and
> actually claimed they made him feel "sick". <g> He now eats and loves
> veal which he had never eaten before, as well as filet mignon which he had
> never tasted. Still, he'd probably have a hamburger if left to his own
> devices, and a greasy one at that, however greasy food is now verboten.
> He will eat *shredded* lettuce on a sandwich or a very small salad, but
> God forbig he should eat a *leaf* of it. <g> After this many yaers I'm
> quite used to it, plan for it, and it's no major effort now. Eating out
> he will join me at Asian restaurants but no foods on their menus will ever
> pass his lips. One exception is Lemon Chicken, as long as it doesn't have
> too many "pieces" of other things in it. <g> And so it goes...
>
> --
> Wayne Boatwright **


Why am I singing "The Things We Do for Love" now? LOL...

Well, you really do have to choose your battles. I will put up with
DH's quirks because I know he would never, ever, lie, cheat or steal,
and he carries me around on a velvet pillow. But of course I have to
remind myself of that when he is being his most, ahem,
"detail-oriented"...
-L.

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Ophelia
 
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"Wayne Boatwright" > wrote in message
...
>> Glory be.. he is worse than my David..........................
>>
>> I still love him though)

>
> Yes, I love mine, too. <g>


)))


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OmManiPadmeOmelet
 
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In article <M6eyf.72176$4l5.13486@dukeread05>,
Roberta > wrote:

> OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:
> > In article > ,
> > sarah bennett > wrote:
> >
> >
> >>The only thing I will not consume under nearly any circumstance are lima
> >>beans.

> >
> >
> > <high fives Sarah>
> >
> > I hate them too.
> > Always have, always will.
> >
> > Other beans I hate are black eyed peas and garbanzo/chick peas!
> >
> > Ick!

>
> My oldest daughter eats very very few vegetables - at the moment she
> enjoys brocolli (steamed ONLY) and lima beans .... talk about odd taste
>
> Roberta (in VA)


At least it's healthy... :-)
--
Om.

"My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
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OmManiPadmeOmelet
 
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In article >,
Steve Wertz > wrote:

> I gotta change the font on my newsreader. The subject looked like
> "Pussy Eaters" so I skipped it the first time thinking it was more
> trolling.
>
> But - since were here on the subject anyway...
>
> Ahh, forget it.
>
> -sw


Naughty boy....... ;-)

If you are looking for Cat recipes,
try a thai list.

<smirk>
--
Om.

"My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
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Dave Smith
 
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Jen wrote:

> >
> > We are pretty lucky in my family. My wife has a thing about beets and is
> > not to crazy about lima beans, but will eat just about anything. My son is
> > pretty adventurous. The only one in the family who is a PITA is my older
> > brother's oldest son. It's bad enough that he has so many dislikes, but he
> > pouts about the lack of options. He was here for Christmas dinner two
> > years ago. We had Carrot Pudding with caramel sauce,

>
> This is so totally off subject! But Carrot Pudding with caramel sauce!
> I've never heard of it. Recipe please.


I can try to get it for you. My mother makes it every year. It is like plum
pudding and contains, some sugar, flour, suet, raisins, dates, currants,
shredded carrots, spiced with cinnamon, nutmeg, allspice. It is made about a
month or so ahead of Christmas and then steamed. It looks (and tastes) better
by flaming with brandy.

The caramel sauce is made by melting butter, adding brown sugar, then some milk
and some water. Serve hot over the carrot pudding.


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Wayne Boatwright
 
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On Sun 15 Jan 2006 12:57:00a, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it -L.?

>
> Wayne Boatwright wrote:
>> Oh, I tried my best to reform him when we were first together. I have
>> to admit that he would "try" to eat some of the (quite normal) things
>> he had never eaten before, but most of them he simply couldn't abide,
>> and actually claimed they made him feel "sick". <g> He now eats and
>> loves veal which he had never eaten before, as well as filet mignon
>> which he had never tasted. Still, he'd probably have a hamburger if
>> left to his own devices, and a greasy one at that, however greasy food
>> is now verboten. He will eat *shredded* lettuce on a sandwich or a very
>> small salad, but God forbig he should eat a *leaf* of it. <g> After
>> this many yaers I'm quite used to it, plan for it, and it's no major
>> effort now. Eating out he will join me at Asian restaurants but no
>> foods on their menus will ever pass his lips. One exception is Lemon
>> Chicken, as long as it doesn't have too many "pieces" of other things
>> in it. <g> And so it goes...
>>
>> --
>> Wayne Boatwright **

>
> Why am I singing "The Things We Do for Love" now? LOL...


> Well, you really do have to choose your battles. I will put up with
> DH's quirks because I know he would never, ever, lie, cheat or steal,
> and he carries me around on a velvet pillow. But of course I have to
> remind myself of that when he is being his most, ahem,
> "detail-oriented"...
> -L.
>


I understand. David more than compensates for his food quirks.



--
Wayne Boatwright **
__________________________________________________ ________________
And if we enter a room full of manure, may we believe in the pony.


Remove all "xxx's" from address to e-mail directly.


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Julia Altshuler
 
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I've thought more about the question of what makes a fussy adult and how
to deal with them. I've decided that the definition of fussy is someone
who can't find anything to eat in a restaurant or social gathering or
someone who can't be polite in those situations.


Example: I don't eat raw fish. I know that lots of people adore sushi
bars, but I can't bring myself to try it. That makes me fussy. Except
that I happily go along to Japanese restaurants if that's where my
friends are going, and I can always find something to enjoy on the menu.
There's miso soup, salads, rice with vegetables, teriaki, noodles in
sauces, etc. To my mind, that means I'm not fussy.


From time to time I'll be at a friend's home when they're serving
something I don't like, but I can normally find a way to eat something
else they're serving without calling attention to myself. I certainly
don't have to bring my own food (though I normally offer to bring a dish).


There are actually a fair number of foods that I don't like. Some of
them I don't eat because of legitimate health concerns. Others don't
make sense, but I'm always able to order something in a restaurant or
turn down food politely. I'm not someone who has to have a lot of food
at every meal. If there's really nothing I care to eat, I can skip a
few meals without noticeable effect.


The stories of people who can be offered 10 desserts, turn them all
down, and insist on going out for something different, amuse and horrify
me. THAT'S fussy.


--Lia

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Nathalie Chiva
 
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On Sat, 14 Jan 2006 15:42:29 -0800, Terry Pulliam Burd
> wrote:

>One step-daughter is so fussy that when the DH and I were first
>married, I thought she was a vegetarian. She isn't.


My sister in law is like that. No red meat, no offal, no pork... Only
chicken. Oh, most veggies are out too. That leaves yogurt, chicken,
rice, potatoes, pasta, pizza and cookies. She's one of those
girls/women who eat hardly anything at the table, but still gain
weight... (yeah, it's called snacking)

Nathalie in Switzerland

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Nancy Young
 
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Default Fussy Eaters


"Julia Altshuler" > wrote

> I've thought more about the question of what makes a fussy adult and how
> to deal with them. I've decided that the definition of fussy is someone
> who can't find anything to eat in a restaurant or social gathering or
> someone who can't be polite in those situations.


I like your definition a lot. It occurred to me after reading a few
of the responses, if someone you don't eat with every day manages
to make their list of won't-eat foods known in the space of a meal?
Sounds pretty picky to me.

> Example: I don't eat raw fish. I know that lots of people adore sushi
> bars, but I can't bring myself to try it. That makes me fussy. Except
> that I happily go along to Japanese restaurants if that's where my friends
> are going, and I can always find something to enjoy on the menu.


Exactly.

> There's miso soup, salads, rice with vegetables, teriaki, noodles in
> sauces, etc. To my mind, that means I'm not fussy.
>
>
> From time to time I'll be at a friend's home when they're serving
> something I don't like, but I can normally find a way to eat something
> else they're serving without calling attention to myself. I certainly
> don't have to bring my own food (though I normally offer to bring a dish).
>
>
> There are actually a fair number of foods that I don't like. Some of them
> I don't eat because of legitimate health concerns. Others don't make
> sense, but I'm always able to order something in a restaurant or turn down
> food politely. I'm not someone who has to have a lot of food at every
> meal. If there's really nothing I care to eat, I can skip a few meals
> without noticeable effect.


> The stories of people who can be offered 10 desserts, turn them all down,
> and insist on going out for something different, amuse and horrify me.
> THAT'S fussy.


Honestly. That kind of person makes you know for sure that there
are people who are 'fussy' in order to be the center of attention.
Guess, what, so don't eat dessert, shut up already. Take a cookie
and pretend to eat it. Whatever.

nancy


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Dave Smith
 
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Default Fussy Eaters

Julia Altshuler wrote:

> I've thought more about the question of what makes a fussy adult and how
> to deal with them. I've decided that the definition of fussy is someone
> who can't find anything to eat in a restaurant or social gathering or
> someone who can't be polite in those situations.


That could be my nephew. While it is possible for him to find something to
eat, if there are lots of options, and he will whine about the lack of choice.

> Example: I don't eat raw fish. I know that lots of people adore sushi
> bars, but I can't bring myself to try it.


Nothing wrong with some raw fish, but I realize some people are squeamish
about it. Personally. I think most fish tastes better cooked than raw,
especially the sushi I have had.

> From time to time I'll be at a friend's home when they're serving
> something I don't like, but I can normally find a way to eat something
> else they're serving without calling attention to myself. I certainly
> don't have to bring my own food (though I normally offer to bring a dish).


When eating at friends' places I tend to eat only small portions of potatoes,
tomatoes, and avoid completely all citrus and nuts. I like them, but I suffer
if I eat them, I prefer to just not make a fuss and would rather do without
than make a fuss.

> There are actually a fair number of foods that I don't like. Some of
> them I don't eat because of legitimate health concerns. Others don't
> make sense, but I'm always able to order something in a restaurant or
> turn down food politely.


That was what really bothered me about my nephew at Christmas. There were lots
of options, things I had made, and those that his brother, his mother and and
his grandmother had contributed. Instead of just declining, he whines and
pouts. He is way past the age where that would be acceptable, and old enough
to know that if he is so damned picky he can bring along something he does
like.


> The stories of people who can be offered 10 desserts, turn them all
> down, and insist on going out for something different, amuse and horrify
> me. THAT'S fussy.


I was raised to eat what was offered. I try to offer a selection. When it
comes to people who are that picky I would simply rather not bother.

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Dave Smith
 
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Terry Pulliam Burd wrote:

> One step-daughter is so fussy that when the DH and I were first
> married, I thought she was a vegetarian. She isn't.


We once had a great niece show up at Christmas. We were expecting the rest
of the family but did not know that she was in town and did not know that
she had become a vegan. While I was cooking and serving up dinner for 15,
my wife is running around the kitchen offering her things. She had to
examine every label to check ingredients. It turned out that her father had
some vegan food for her but forgot to bring it.

The next time I saw the great niece as a year and a half later. She was
sitting across the table from me at a brunch buffet. I saw her pack away
bacon, ham, eggs, lobster, shrimp, roast beef. It struck me strange that it
was a real PITA to have to run around in the midst of preparing a large
dinner to try to find vegan food for her, but at a buffet where there were
lots of meatless options and other people to cater to her, she could fill
herself up with meat.



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D.Currie
 
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Default Fussy Eaters


"Julia Altshuler" > wrote in message
. ..
> I've thought more about the question of what makes a fussy adult and how
> to deal with them. I've decided that the definition of fussy is someone
> who can't find anything to eat in a restaurant or social gathering or
> someone who can't be polite in those situations.


I'm with you on that. On the other hand, I firmly believe that adults should
be free to choose what to eat or not when they're dining somewhere, and when
we have people over, I always try to have choices available, should they
dislike something I've served. And I'll serve "family style" so if they
don't like tomatoes, they can avoid putting them on their plate when the
salad comes around. I'll usually have two salad dressings at the table, and
I'll serve two vegetables. Condiments will be left off for people to decide
which ones and how much.

While there is a very short list of things that I won't eat -- raisins,
coconut, and fish with small bones -- there are other things that while I
wouldn't gag or refuse to eat them, I'd prefer to politely decline. For
example, my MIL's "gravy" is basically flour browned and/or burnt in a dry
teflon pan, with water added. I would prefer not to have that on top of any
food. But sometimes she'll serve a roast, cut up, with the "gravy" poured
over the top. I don't make a fuss over it, I just try to choose a slice with
minimal gravy. Other things she serves, you get no choice. Salad, soup, and
dessert are just given to you. I tend not to like her desserts, so I've
learned that if I go into the kitchen when she's dishing it up, I can stop
her by saying that I'm really full. But otherwise, you get no choice about
getting the dessert or how much of it you get.

Worst example is a now-unrelated in-law who used to put raisins in the
meatballs she made with spaghetti. She served family-style, and I'd just
take the noodles, no meatballs. That was fine with me. If she was sitting
anywhere within arms reach of me, she'd take meatballs from the serving dish
and put them on my plate. If she wasn't close by, she'd tell someone else to
give me some meatballs. The only way I could eat those things was by
dissecting them to remove the raisins. I would have preferred to just not
take the meatballs.


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S'mee
 
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One time on Usenet, "Bob Terwilliger" >
said:
> Jani wrote:


> > But I'm more interested in knowing what kind of fussiness
> > the rest of you may have to deal with...

>
> My girlfriend insists that she isn't fussy. I think she is. Here's the list
> of things she won't eat: okra, walnuts, pecans, pistachios, any kind of
> squash, any Indian or Asian food (except Japanese; for some reason Japanese
> food is "acceptable." But Chinese, Thai, Korean, and Vietnamese foods are
> rejected out of hand.), oysters, brussels sprouts, chicken, spicy foods,
> cucumbers, and bacon. Oh, and she doesn't like anything to be "too French,"
> whatever that means.


Yeah, not the kind of comment one wants from a girlfriend... ;-)


--
Jani in WA (S'mee)
~ mom, Trollop, novice cook ~
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Dave Smith
 
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Bob Terwilliger wrote:

> My girlfriend insists that she isn't fussy. I think she is. Here's the list
> of things she won't eat: okra, walnuts, pecans, pistachios, any kind of
> squash, any Indian or Asian food (except Japanese; for some reason Japanese
> food is "acceptable." But Chinese, Thai, Korean, and Vietnamese foods are
> rejected out of hand.), oysters, brussels sprouts, chicken, spicy foods,
> cucumbers, and bacon. Oh, and she doesn't like anything to be "too French,"
> whatever that means.


Some of those are common dislikes, but there are enough of them there that she
fits within the definition of fussy eater. She definitely isn't an adventurous
eater. Odd that fish and squid are not on the list of foods she won't touch.


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Roberta
 
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Default Fussy Eaters

OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:
> In article <M6eyf.72176$4l5.13486@dukeread05>,
> Roberta > wrote:
>
>
>>OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:
>>
>>>In article > ,
>>> sarah bennett > wrote:
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>>The only thing I will not consume under nearly any circumstance are lima
>>>>beans.
>>>
>>>
>>><high fives Sarah>
>>>
>>>I hate them too.
>>>Always have, always will.
>>>
>>>Other beans I hate are black eyed peas and garbanzo/chick peas!
>>>
>>>Ick!

>>
>>My oldest daughter eats very very few vegetables - at the moment she
>>enjoys brocolli (steamed ONLY) and lima beans .... talk about odd taste
>>
>>Roberta (in VA)

>
>
> At least it's healthy... :-)


True - I just find it weird that she won't eat corn in ANY form, Cooked
carrots (although slowly she is starting to eat them IN things). I
actually don't know if there are any vegetables BUT brocolli and lima
beans that she will eat...*shake head* I don't make the kids eat things
they don't want to - they do have to taste new stuff. If I make
something I KNOW one or both of the girls won't like I will make
something different...If it is something they decide at the dinner table
they don't like - they are free to fix themselves a sandwich. I just
fine mealtimes more pleasant that way And, I was forced to eat
things I didn't like - to the point of getting physically ill from it.
There are things I still can not stomach because of that. I grew out of
picky all on my own I think.

Roberta (in VA)
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sarah bennett
 
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OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:
> In article > ,
> sarah bennett > wrote:
>
>
>>The only thing I will not consume under nearly any circumstance are lima
>>beans.

>
>
> <high fives Sarah>
>
> I hate them too.
> Always have, always will.
>
> Other beans I hate are black eyed peas and garbanzo/chick peas!
>
> Ick!


those I love

--

saerah

http://anisaerah.blogspot.com/

"Peace is not an absence of war, it is a virtue, a state of mind, a
disposition for benevolence, confidence, justice."
-Baruch Spinoza

"There is a theory which states that if ever anybody discovers exactly
what the Universe is for and why it is here, it will instantly disappear
and be replaced by something even more bizarre and inexplicable. There
is another theory which states that this has already happened."
-Douglas Adams


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Nathalie Chiva
 
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Default Fussy Eaters

On Sun, 15 Jan 2006 18:55:05 +0100, Nathalie Chiva
> wrote:

>On Sat, 14 Jan 2006 15:42:29 -0800, Terry Pulliam Burd
> wrote:
>
>>One step-daughter is so fussy that when the DH and I were first
>>married, I thought she was a vegetarian. She isn't.

>
>My sister in law is like that. No red meat, no offal, no pork... Only
>chicken. Oh, most veggies are out too. That leaves yogurt, chicken,
>rice, potatoes, pasta, pizza and cookies. She's one of those
>girls/women who eat hardly anything at the table, but still gain
>weight... (yeah, it's called snacking)


Oh and I forgot - no fish or anything "fishy" - of course! (sigh)

Nathalie in Switzerland

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D.Currie
 
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Default Fussy Eaters


"Julia Altshuler" > wrote in message
. ..
> I've thought more about the question of what makes a fussy adult and how
> to deal with them. I've decided that the definition of fussy is someone
> who can't find anything to eat in a restaurant or social gathering or
> someone who can't be polite in those situations.
>


Thinking even more about this, If you have to change the way you cook to
accommodate someone's list of banned foods (barring medical or religious
reasons) then they might be considered fussy. Unless of course your own
cooking is quirky to begin with.

But consider this list of foods that one couple has, at one time or another,
said they don't like/can't eat: onion, black pepper, celery seed/celery
salt, oregano, marjoram, basil, mint, rosemary, Mexican food, Italian food,
spicy food of any sort, olive oil, winter squash, chocolate, cucumber, corn,
garlic, chicken gizzards, liver, anything in the cabbage family, dressing on
salad, raw tomato, cumin, most ethnic foods, and most
spices/herbs/seasonings, asparagus, radishes, spinach, sourdough bread, rye
bread...and I've never seen them eat any sort of fish or seafood. Oh, I'm
sure I'm missing a few things; I'm still compiling the list.

And, they've commented on other dinners they've had pointing out fatal flaws
in the cooking. For example, one time they were served baked potato with a
ham dinner and that "ruined the meal." Okay, baked potato with ham wouldn't
be my first choice, but it wouldn't ruin the meal for me. There have been
similar comments, criticizing other meals they've been served and each time
I've thought that the comment was overly critical.

When we dine at their house, the vegetable is invariably green beans
(frozen, never fresh) with fake bacon bits on top, and there are no spices
or seasonings used on anything. Not even salt. No butter, either. Anywhere.
If there is butter on the table, it is actually margarine mixed with some
sort of oil and either sugar or corn syrup as she doesn't like hard butter,
and it's too much trouble to take it out of the fridge ahead of time. I'll
tell ya, it's a shock when you butter a roll and the "butter" is sweet. And
this is the same person who makes "gravy" from flour and water, and I once
saw her dress a salad with watered-down ketchup. And the many times we've
eaten ham there (one of their favorites) it's not cooked, it's microwaved,
and then she pours maple-flavored pancake syrup on top.

When they've dined with us, they've eaten a number of things on their
"banned" list, particularly the spices/herbs/seasonings/flavorings. And they
rave about how good it is, and take second and third and fourth helpings.
But if you ask them if they like oregano or rosemary or sage, for example,
they'll say no. Which makes cooking for them somewhat of a challenge because
I'm never sure if they really don't like something, or if it's just
something they say they don't like because they don't have it at home.

And the list is getting longer. It seems like each time we eat with them,
they tell us about more foods they don't like. It not as bad as it seems,
though, as there are some things I know I can cook for them. But I wouldn't
want to eat with them on a daily basis.


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Frenchy
 
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"sarah bennett" > wrote in message
...
: OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:
: > In article > ,
: > sarah bennett > wrote:
: >
: >
: >>The only thing I will not consume under nearly any circumstance are lima
: >>beans.
: >
: >
: > <high fives Sarah>
: >
: > I hate them too.
: > Always have, always will.
: >
: > Other beans I hate are black eyed peas and garbanzo/chick peas!
: >
: > Ick!
:
: those I love
:
: --
:
: saerah
:
: http://anisaerah.blogspot.com/

Good Blog, but I couldn't easily see where I could comment, hence here.

On it U say people comment on your Photos (negatively). They look fine to me.
Try using Picasa2 from Google. It quickly cleans up all photos and the add Light
slider does a good job and you can crop and post nice and clear and small photos.

Frenchy


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sarah bennett
 
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Default Fussy Eaters

Frenchy wrote:
<snip>
>
> Good Blog, but I couldn't easily see where I could comment, hence here.
>
> On it U say people comment on your Photos (negatively). They look fine to me.
> Try using Picasa2 from Google. It quickly cleans up all photos and the add Light
> slider does a good job and you can crop and post nice and clear and small photos.
>
> Frenchy
>
>


thanks!
you click the small text under the post where it says "{x number of)
comments". I have been using irfanview to edit, but I got some books out
of the library on digital photography, and I am going to peruse them later.

--

saerah

http://anisaerah.blogspot.com/

"Peace is not an absence of war, it is a virtue, a state of mind, a
disposition for benevolence, confidence, justice."
-Baruch Spinoza

"There is a theory which states that if ever anybody discovers exactly
what the Universe is for and why it is here, it will instantly disappear
and be replaced by something even more bizarre and inexplicable. There
is another theory which states that this has already happened."
-Douglas Adams
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Ray S. & Nayda Katzaman
 
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Default Fussy Eaters



S'mee wrote:

> I was checking out Gloria's Sweet & Sour Cocktail Meatball recipe
> (which sounds excellent, btw; my sibling makes something very similar).
> Anyway, I figured I wouldn't bother to save the recipe because Miguel
> (DH) doesn't like meatballs of any kind. Or white sauce. Or coconut.
> Or most sandwiches. *Sigh*
>
> Now I'm sure at least 10 people are queuing up to tell me I should
> make him eat it anyway, because they certainly wouldn't put up with
> that. But I'm more interested in knowing what kind of fussiness
> the rest of you may have to deal with...
>
> --
> Jani in WA (S'mee)
> ~ mom, Trollop, novice cook ~


Both our families (my wife's and mine) pretty much eat anything that is put
in front of us - season a bunch of rocks properly and we will chow them
down.

Cheers,

Ray
Austin, TX
===




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Julia Altshuler
 
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Nancy Young wrote:

> I like your definition a lot. It occurred to me after reading a few
> of the responses, if someone you don't eat with every day manages
> to make their list of won't-eat foods known in the space of a meal?
> Sounds pretty picky to me.


> Honestly. That kind of person makes you know for sure that there
> are people who are 'fussy' in order to be the center of attention.
> Guess, what, so don't eat dessert, shut up already. Take a cookie
> and pretend to eat it. Whatever.



I guess the next trick is to come up with a definition of how to turn
down food politely. There are people who were brought up to believe
that not asking for seconds was impolite. Or not eating everything
offered to them. I'd say that the host or hostess who notices
everything a guest is eating and comments on it or who acts like there's
something terribly wrong with someone not eating or not eating enough,
to me, those people are being more impolite than the guest who merely
says, no thanks. Once you've been around enough over-anxious hosts, it
is easy to turn into an impolite guest. I mean, if I'm with a host who
won't take no for answer unless I offer a good enough excuse, I'm likely
to turn into the sort of guest who starts offering the will or will not
eat list ahead of time.


More tales from the wine and cheese shop-- We offer tastes of the
cheeses to help customers decide which ones they like. I know not to
offer food to kids younger than 5-6 because they've been taught not to
accept food from strangers. I speak directly to the parent and ask if I
may offer the kids some food. Whether the answer is yes or no, that
never bothers me.


I'm starting to notice something disturbing with the parents of some of
the older kids. Sometimes the kid will be in the 11-12-13 year old
range. The parents are right there. I'll offer the cheese to the
parent first. (I don't too much care if I serve men or women first, but
I'm careful to serve elders before young folk. This isn't a rule of the
store, but it works for me.) Sometimes the parents will offer to the
kids, and that's fine. But sometimes the parents will let their kids
talk to me directly about anything else, but when it comes to food, they
answer for the children. As in, the kid will smile and act like he's
considering taking a taste, maybe a little reticent but not turning it
down, and the parent will say "he doesn't like it," or "you don't like
that." WTF? Now THAT'S a control issue.



--Lia

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Julia Altshuler
 
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Default Fussy Eaters

It was on this list that someone suggested that being vegan was a form
of eating disorder. I've thought about it since and am becoming more
convinced that that's the case. Yours in one example. Here's another.


I was visiting with a group of friends. We all went out to eat at a
large deli-style restaurant. The vegan in the group saw split pea soup
on the menu, checked with the waitress that there was no ham in it,
ordered it and ate it. Normal, right? The next time we were at the
friend's house, the hostess, knowing that this particular guest was
peculiar about what she ate, offered her water. The guest wouldn't
drink it because it wasn't bottled water! This was water from a safe
municipal supply, but it wasn't good enough. I noticed the
inconsistency. Surely the soup at the restaurant used the same
municipal water, but at the restaurant it didn't matter. The next time
the hostess picked up some bottled water. No good. It wasn't the right
sort of bottled water.


If that isn't enough to convince you (the general you, not you in
particular, Dave) that it's not about the food, it's about the person
refusing the food, nothing will. There must be something grand about
watching people run around getting something special for you.


--Lia


Dave Smith wrote:
>
> We once had a great niece show up at Christmas. We were expecting the rest
> of the family but did not know that she was in town and did not know that
> she had become a vegan. While I was cooking and serving up dinner for 15,
> my wife is running around the kitchen offering her things. She had to
> examine every label to check ingredients. It turned out that her father had
> some vegan food for her but forgot to bring it.
>
> The next time I saw the great niece as a year and a half later. She was
> sitting across the table from me at a brunch buffet. I saw her pack away
> bacon, ham, eggs, lobster, shrimp, roast beef. It struck me strange that it
> was a real PITA to have to run around in the midst of preparing a large
> dinner to try to find vegan food for her, but at a buffet where there were
> lots of meatless options and other people to cater to her, she could fill
> herself up with meat.
>


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Dave Smith
 
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Julia Altshuler wrote:

> It was on this list that someone suggested that being vegan was a form
> of eating disorder. I've thought about it since and am becoming more
> convinced that that's the case. Yours in one example. Here's another.
>
> I was visiting with a group of friends. We all went out to eat at a
> large deli-style restaurant. The vegan in the group saw split pea soup
> on the menu, checked with the waitress that there was no ham in it,
> ordered it and ate it. Normal, right? The next time we were at the
> friend's house, the hostess, knowing that this particular guest was
> peculiar about what she ate, offered her water. The guest wouldn't
> drink it because it wasn't bottled water! This was water from a safe
> municipal supply, but it wasn't good enough. I noticed the
> inconsistency. Surely the soup at the restaurant used the same
> municipal water, but at the restaurant it didn't matter. The next time
> the hostess picked up some bottled water. No good. It wasn't the right
> sort of bottled water.
>
> If that isn't enough to convince you (the general you, not you in
> particular, Dave) that it's not about the food, it's about the person
> refusing the food, nothing will. There must be something grand about
> watching people run around getting something special for you.


The vast majority of friends and relatives that have gone vegetarian or vegan have
gone back to eating meat. Personally, I don't care what sort of diet they
maintain, but because of my experience of their short lived fad diets, I am not
interested in catering to them. They are welcome to come to my house and share a
meal with us, but they are going to have to bring their own food if they don't
want to eat what we have.



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Jen
 
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>> This is so totally off subject! But Carrot Pudding with caramel sauce!
>> I've never heard of it. Recipe please.

>
> I can try to get it for you. My mother makes it every year. It is like
> plum
> pudding and contains, some sugar, flour, suet, raisins, dates, currants,
> shredded carrots, spiced with cinnamon, nutmeg, allspice. It is made about
> a
> month or so ahead of Christmas and then steamed. It looks (and tastes)
> better
> by flaming with brandy.
>
> The caramel sauce is made by melting butter, adding brown sugar, then some
> milk
> and some water. Serve hot over the carrot pudding.



Sounds delicious. I would love the recipe please.

Jen


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Jen
 
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> The stories of people who can be offered 10 desserts, turn them all down,
> and insist on going out for something different, amuse and horrify me.
> THAT'S fussy.



I agree. I think that's fussy. Sometimes I think my 10 year old daughter's
getting fussy. But then when her friends come over I realise she isn't bad
at all. Some of her friends only have a few things they will eat and I have
a terrible time trying to find something for them. I'm convinced it's
because they're given too many choices, and then if they don't eat it
straight away, an hour later they're hungry and given chips and junk. I
think some kids think if they don't totally *love* the food, they can eat
the junk instead. So many friends of my daughters just eat junk. I tell my
daughter, that she doesn't have to *love* everything I cook, but she has to
taste it, and eat it if she can. She can have a healthy replacement if she
really hates it, but no snacks later on. They have to learn from their
mistakes, a healthy meal now, is better than going hungry till breakfast
time. One of her friends hardly seems to eat anything, but then we had her
over for tea and had Mcdonalds. I couldn't believe how much junk she could
eat. And her mother lets her! She's only 9, she had a cheeseburger, a
quarter pounder, 2 large fries, a large coke, and an ice-cream sundae. My
daughter usually only has 3 nuggets (6 if she's really hungry), small fries,
small drink, a sundae if she's really hungry.

I'm a big believer in it's not how much they eat, but what they eat. Just
picking at bits of healthy balanced meal is much better than eating nothing
but junk.

Jen


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