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  #81 (permalink)   Report Post  
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Puester
 
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Julia Altshuler wrote:
>
>
> The stories of people who can be offered 10 desserts, turn them all
> down, and insist on going out for something different, amuse and horrify
> me. THAT'S fussy.
>
>
> --Lia
>


When my sister-in-law and her extended family come to Colorado to ski
they stay with us the first and last night to be closer to the airport.
I usually make a big meal for everyone, keeping in mind her selectively
vegetarian 40 yr. old son.

The last time I made lasagna, one with meat, one meatless, a big salad,
and garlic bread. Her son-in-law ate hardly anything, then left to pick
someone up from the airport. I later learned that as soon as he left
the house he stopped at Taco Bell for dinner. Yes, he's out of the will.

:-(
gloria p
  #82 (permalink)   Report Post  
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Puester
 
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Dave Smith wrote:

>
> That was what really bothered me about my nephew at Christmas. There were lots
> of options, things I had made, and those that his brother, his mother and and
> his grandmother had contributed. Instead of just declining, he whines and
> pouts. He is way past the age where that would be acceptable, and old enough
> to know that if he is so damned picky he can bring along something he does
> like.
>
>
>
> I was raised to eat what was offered. I try to offer a selection. When it
> comes to people who are that picky I would simply rather not bother.
>


Many years ago when we were in college we had the perfect suggestion:
"Give him 25 cents and send him to Dairy Queen." Figuratively, of course.

gloria p
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Karen MacInerney
 
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King's Crown wrote:
> I'd never make my husband eat something, but the kids I do make them try one
> bite. When they were little they'd cry for an hour, because of having to
> try one bite. Now they just eat it and move on. I'd say 90% of the time
> they still won't eat the dish they tried, but at least they've tried it.
>

I am SO with you.

Child one has not touched a vegetable (except for cherry tomatoes and
corn -- but only on the cob) since the age of 15 months. She also does
not like sauce on pizza (or anything else), and will not touch any meat
that isn't completely and utterly devoid of visible seasonings. She is
so averse to green things that she will not touch kiwi.

The other, thank God, is a bit more flexible in the food department.
But add child one's requirements with those of our most frequent dinner
guests, who do not like 1) vinegar 2) onions or 3) goat cheese, and I'm
left cooking nothing but oatmeal. Actually, no -- child one won't eat
oatmeal, either. *sigh*

What I need to do is ship child one to her grandparents' house for
dinner and invite some culinarily adventurous RFCers over to dinner!

Karen MacInerney
Kitchen experimenter, family chauffeur, and culinary mystery author
www.karenmacinerney.com

  #84 (permalink)   Report Post  
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Jo Anne Slaven
 
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>S'mee wrote:

>> But I'm more interested in knowing what kind of fussiness
>> the rest of you may have to deal with...


My husband will eat freakin' anything. I'm the fussy one.

One thing I can't figure out about my fussiness is that I don't like
freshwater fish. I love "seafood" (lobster, crab, shrimp, etc), and I
like sal****er fish (halibut, cod, grouper, snapper, et al), but
pickerel, trout, and other freshwater fish just all tastes really
"fishy" to me.

Anyone else have the same fish preferences?

Jo Anne
  #85 (permalink)   Report Post  
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Dave Smith
 
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Jo Anne Slaven wrote:

> >> But I'm more interested in knowing what kind of fussiness
> >> the rest of you may have to deal with...

>
> My husband will eat freakin' anything. I'm the fussy one.


My wife has some food allergies to deal with, but if a guest at someone's
house will eat what is served. As far as dislikes..... she hates beets.
She will eat just about anything else is she has to.

> One thing I can't figure out about my fussiness is that I don't like
> freshwater fish. I love "seafood" (lobster, crab, shrimp, etc), and I
> like sal****er fish (halibut, cod, grouper, snapper, et al), but
> pickerel, trout, and other freshwater fish just all tastes really
> "fishy" to me.


I never did understand the "fishy" taste. I always associated with stuff
like Bluefish, a salt water fish, and smelt, a freshwater fish.

> Anyone else have the same fish preferences?


I like just about any kind of fish. I would prefer not to have to deal
with Whitefish because the last few times I had it were exercising in
extracting small fish bones from my mouth. I had an aversion to Mackerel
for a long time because I worked for a while as a trainer at a marine
park and started each day cutting up 600-700 pounds of Mackerel. I could
walk into a fish store and smell that stuff. I actually gave it a try
last year and it wasn't bad.

I am not crazy about octopus, but every time I have had it, it has been
tough and chewy. I didn't mind the taste. I once had it served with a
spicy sauce in a Molloccan restaurant and it was quite tasty.




  #86 (permalink)   Report Post  
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Christine Dabney
 
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On Sun, 15 Jan 2006 16:40:53 -0500, Julia Altshuler
> wrote:

>It was on this list that someone suggested that being vegan was a form
>of eating disorder. I've thought about it since and am becoming more
>convinced that that's the case. Yours in one example. Here's another.
>
>
>I was visiting with a group of friends. We all went out to eat at a
>large deli-style restaurant. The vegan in the group saw split pea soup
>on the menu, checked with the waitress that there was no ham in it,
>ordered it and ate it. Normal, right? The next time we were at the
>friend's house, the hostess, knowing that this particular guest was
>peculiar about what she ate, offered her water. The guest wouldn't
>drink it because it wasn't bottled water! This was water from a safe
>municipal supply, but it wasn't good enough. I noticed the
>inconsistency. Surely the soup at the restaurant used the same
>municipal water, but at the restaurant it didn't matter. The next time
>the hostess picked up some bottled water. No good. It wasn't the right
>sort of bottled water.


I wish I could agree with your opinion, but I can't.

I have a very good friend who is vegan, and believe me, it is not
about the person, at least in his case. He is very concerned about
what is in our food supply, and in our water for instance. He became
vegan not because he disliked meat or anything, but because he felt it
was the healthiest way for him to eat. He started eating this way,
because he was noticing a lot of things about his body that he felt
were diet related. He says now, that he feels much, much better. He
gave himself a year to try it out and see if it made a difference.

I have discussed this with him, ad nauseum. He knows about my "foodie"
preferences. All his friends and I tease him relentlessly about his
meatless, vegan choices, and he takes it very good naturedly, and has
astounding research to back up his choices. And yes, he feels there
are some better choices of vegan products and other things in our food
supply.

Yes, he goes out to eat with folks, and yes he orders from the menu. I
have been with him when he was ordering dinner at a restaurant, and he
quizzes the waiter about what exactly is in the food, and how it is
cooked, etc. It is usually a very intelligent questioning.

He is a single father and he is not forcing his diet on his young
daughter. But he is teaching her to eat healthily. His girlfriend is
not vegan, but tends towards being vegetarian. Again, he doesn't try
to force his choice on her. And he is hoping to have a garden soon,
whereby he can grow most of his own veggies, and make sure they are
raised organically.

As far as bottled water, there is a lot of controversy as to whether
some bottled water is just tap water, at least some brands. And some
tap waters are absolutely horrible as far as what is in them.

Christine
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Dave Smith
 
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Christine Dabney wrote:

>
> I wish I could agree with your opinion, but I can't.
>
> I have a very good friend who is vegan, and believe me, it is not
> about the person, at least in his case.


Maybe not in his case. There may be the odd one that is sincere and will
stick to it. My problem is that, for most of them, it is a fad diet. It makes
no difference to me what kind of diet they follow. I just won't cater to it.


  #88 (permalink)   Report Post  
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The Bubbo
 
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Jo Anne Slaven wrote:
>>S'mee wrote:

>
>>> But I'm more interested in knowing what kind of fussiness
>>> the rest of you may have to deal with...

>
> My husband will eat freakin' anything. I'm the fussy one.
>
> One thing I can't figure out about my fussiness is that I don't like
> freshwater fish. I love "seafood" (lobster, crab, shrimp, etc), and I
> like sal****er fish (halibut, cod, grouper, snapper, et al), but
> pickerel, trout, and other freshwater fish just all tastes really
> "fishy" to me.
>
> Anyone else have the same fish preferences?
>
> Jo Anne


I do! I love ocean fish and shellfish and sushi, but I dislike freshwater
fish. I really hate when people say "you just haven't had it done properly".
The only way i can see it being done properly is to have it sent to the moon.

--
..:Heather:.
www.velvet-c.com
Step off, beyotches, I'm the roflpimp!
  #89 (permalink)   Report Post  
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Sheldon
 
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OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:
>
> NOBODY should be forced or badgered to eat something they don't like!


Oh, it's "Fussy" Eaters... I gotta get new glasses.

Sheldon

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sarah bennett
 
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Christine Dabney wrote:
> On Sun, 15 Jan 2006 16:40:53 -0500, Julia Altshuler
> > wrote:
>
>
>>It was on this list that someone suggested that being vegan was a form
>>of eating disorder. I've thought about it since and am becoming more
>>convinced that that's the case. Yours in one example. Here's another.
>>
>>
>>I was visiting with a group of friends. We all went out to eat at a
>>large deli-style restaurant. The vegan in the group saw split pea soup
>>on the menu, checked with the waitress that there was no ham in it,
>>ordered it and ate it. Normal, right? The next time we were at the
>>friend's house, the hostess, knowing that this particular guest was
>>peculiar about what she ate, offered her water. The guest wouldn't
>>drink it because it wasn't bottled water! This was water from a safe
>>municipal supply, but it wasn't good enough. I noticed the
>>inconsistency. Surely the soup at the restaurant used the same
>>municipal water, but at the restaurant it didn't matter. The next time
>>the hostess picked up some bottled water. No good. It wasn't the right
>>sort of bottled water.

>
>
> I wish I could agree with your opinion, but I can't.
>
> I have a very good friend who is vegan, and believe me, it is not
> about the person, at least in his case. He is very concerned about
> what is in our food supply, and in our water for instance. He became
> vegan not because he disliked meat or anything, but because he felt it
> was the healthiest way for him to eat. He started eating this way,
> because he was noticing a lot of things about his body that he felt
> were diet related. He says now, that he feels much, much better. He
> gave himself a year to try it out and see if it made a difference.
>
> I have discussed this with him, ad nauseum. He knows about my "foodie"
> preferences. All his friends and I tease him relentlessly about his
> meatless, vegan choices, and he takes it very good naturedly, and has
> astounding research to back up his choices. And yes, he feels there
> are some better choices of vegan products and other things in our food
> supply.
>
> Yes, he goes out to eat with folks, and yes he orders from the menu. I
> have been with him when he was ordering dinner at a restaurant, and he
> quizzes the waiter about what exactly is in the food, and how it is
> cooked, etc. It is usually a very intelligent questioning.
>
> He is a single father and he is not forcing his diet on his young
> daughter. But he is teaching her to eat healthily. His girlfriend is
> not vegan, but tends towards being vegetarian. Again, he doesn't try
> to force his choice on her. And he is hoping to have a garden soon,
> whereby he can grow most of his own veggies, and make sure they are
> raised organically.
>
> As far as bottled water, there is a lot of controversy as to whether
> some bottled water is just tap water, at least some brands. And some
> tap waters are absolutely horrible as far as what is in them.
>
> Christine


I would venture to say that most bottled waters are just filtered tap
water.

--

saerah

http://anisaerah.blogspot.com/

"Peace is not an absence of war, it is a virtue, a state of mind, a
disposition for benevolence, confidence, justice."
-Baruch Spinoza

"There is a theory which states that if ever anybody discovers exactly
what the Universe is for and why it is here, it will instantly disappear
and be replaced by something even more bizarre and inexplicable. There
is another theory which states that this has already happened."
-Douglas Adams


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Christine Dabney
 
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On Sun, 15 Jan 2006 19:03:24 -0500, Dave Smith
> wrote:

>Christine Dabney wrote:
>
>>
>> I wish I could agree with your opinion, but I can't.
>>
>> I have a very good friend who is vegan, and believe me, it is not
>> about the person, at least in his case.

>
>Maybe not in his case. There may be the odd one that is sincere and will
>stick to it. My problem is that, for most of them, it is a fad diet. It makes
>no difference to me what kind of diet they follow. I just won't cater to it.
>

Aren't there a large Indian sect/culture that is vegan? Or another
Asian culture/sect? I seem to remember that there is one, but I
could be totally wrong on this.

Tell them that it is a fad diet.

Christine
  #93 (permalink)   Report Post  
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Dave Smith
 
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The Bubbo wrote:

>
> I do! I love ocean fish and shellfish and sushi, but I dislike freshwater
> fish. I really hate when people say "you just haven't had it done properly".
> The only way i can see it being done properly is to have it sent to the moon.


There is a lot to that thing about having it done right. I used to hate fish. My
mother was a pretty good cook, except that she tended to overcook meat and fish.
It took me a while to learn to like fish, and even longer to learn how to cook
it. Even fresh water fish tastes good when properly cooked, though IMO it tastes
better if caught in cold water. Fish from warm water tends to taste muddy.


  #94 (permalink)   Report Post  
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Dave Smith
 
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Christine Dabney wrote:

>
> >
> >Maybe not in his case. There may be the odd one that is sincere and will
> >stick to it. My problem is that, for most of them, it is a fad diet. It makes
> >no difference to me what kind of diet they follow. I just won't cater to it.
> >

> Aren't there a large Indian sect/culture that is vegan? Or another
> Asian culture/sect? I seem to remember that there is one, but I
> could be totally wrong on this.
>
> Tell them that it is a fad diet.


These people aren't Indian. They are people who become vegan because they think
it is cool and expect you to think they are cool for being vegan. As I said, due
to my experience with them going back to meat, it is a fad.




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The Bubbo
 
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Dave Smith wrote:
> Christine Dabney wrote:
>
>>
>> I wish I could agree with your opinion, but I can't.
>>
>> I have a very good friend who is vegan, and believe me, it is not
>> about the person, at least in his case.

>
> Maybe not in his case. There may be the odd one that is sincere and will
> stick to it. My problem is that, for most of them, it is a fad diet. It

makes
> no difference to me what kind of diet they follow. I just won't cater to it.
>
>


I've had a few vegan friends and all of them were very good about being
responsible for their own food. I never ever mind cooking vegan, that's not an
issue, but for other situations they would bring their own food.

The only time it was a problem was when I was traveling with a vegetarian and
a vegan and we were in Vicksburg, MS. I'd been adamant that they plan ahead
for the times we had to stop to eat and find restaurants that they could eat
at. We knew that on that day we would be in Vicksburg for lunch and no one had
planned ahead, so we sat in the car getting crankier and cranker trying to
find a place to eat.

And the one time it irritated me was on the same trip, there were so many
places in New Orleans I wanted to eat at and I couldn't because they didn't
have vegan options. Being out-voted by them was kind of irritating.

--
..:Heather:.
www.velvet-c.com
Step off, beyotches, I'm the roflpimp!


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Dave Smith
 
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The Bubbo wrote:

> And the one time it irritated me was on the same trip, there were so many
> places in New Orleans I wanted to eat at and I couldn't because they didn't
> have vegan options. Being out-voted by them was kind of irritating.


I can't blame the vegans totally for that. A few years ago went on a trip to
Europe with two brothers and their wives and I got outvoted on just about
everything. I had horrible Italian food in Germany, over priced food at prime
tourist areas in Paris and was outvoted on more interesting places. The next time
I was over there I located some of the places I missed out on during the previous
group trip, which is the last group trip for me. Never again.

  #97 (permalink)   Report Post  
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Chuck
 
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On Sun, 15 Jan 2006 22:24:16 -0500, Dave Smith
> wrote:

>The Bubbo wrote:
>
>> And the one time it irritated me was on the same trip, there were so many
>> places in New Orleans I wanted to eat at and I couldn't because they didn't
>> have vegan options. Being out-voted by them was kind of irritating.

>
>I can't blame the vegans totally for that. A few years ago went on a trip to
>Europe with two brothers and their wives and I got outvoted on just about
>everything. I had horrible Italian food in Germany, over priced food at prime
>tourist areas in Paris and was outvoted on more interesting places. The next time
>I was over there I located some of the places I missed out on during the previous
>group trip, which is the last group trip for me. Never again.

Italian food...... in Germany? You're pulling our collective leg
aren't you?
  #98 (permalink)   Report Post  
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The Bubbo
 
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Dave Smith wrote:
> The Bubbo wrote:
>
>> And the one time it irritated me was on the same trip, there were so many
>> places in New Orleans I wanted to eat at and I couldn't because they didn't
>> have vegan options. Being out-voted by them was kind of irritating.

>
> I can't blame the vegans totally for that. A few years ago went on a trip

to
> Europe with two brothers and their wives and I got outvoted on just about
> everything. I had horrible Italian food in Germany, over priced food at

prime
> tourist areas in Paris and was outvoted on more interesting places. The next

time
> I was over there I located some of the places I missed out on during the

previous
> group trip, which is the last group trip for me. Never again.
>


Yeah, it made sense, but still, it was my first time in New Orleans and there
was so much I wanted to eat and so many places I couldn't go because there
were no options for them.

I've been back many times since and have pigged out to my heart's content.

--
..:Heather:.
www.velvet-c.com
Step off, beyotches, I'm the roflpimp!
  #99 (permalink)   Report Post  
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Chuck
 
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On Sun, 15 Jan 2006 16:40:53 -0500, Julia Altshuler
> wrote:

>It was on this list that someone suggested that being vegan was a form
>of eating disorder. I've thought about it since and am becoming more
>convinced that that's the case. Yours in one example. Here's another.
>
>
>I was visiting with a group of friends. We all went out to eat at a
>large deli-style restaurant. The vegan in the group saw split pea soup
>on the menu, checked with the waitress that there was no ham in it,
>ordered it and ate it. Normal, right? The next time we were at the
>friend's house, the hostess, knowing that this particular guest was
>peculiar about what she ate, offered her water. The guest wouldn't
>drink it because it wasn't bottled water! This was water from a safe
>municipal supply, but it wasn't good enough. I noticed the
>inconsistency. Surely the soup at the restaurant used the same
>municipal water, but at the restaurant it didn't matter. The next time
>the hostess picked up some bottled water. No good. It wasn't the right
>sort of bottled water.
>
>
>If that isn't enough to convince you (the general you, not you in
>particular, Dave) that it's not about the food, it's about the person
>refusing the food, nothing will. There must be something grand about
>watching people run around getting something special for you.
>
>
>--Lia
>
>
>Dave Smith wrote:
>>
>> We once had a great niece show up at Christmas. We were expecting the rest
>> of the family but did not know that she was in town and did not know that
>> she had become a vegan. While I was cooking and serving up dinner for 15,
>> my wife is running around the kitchen offering her things. She had to
>> examine every label to check ingredients. It turned out that her father had
>> some vegan food for her but forgot to bring it.
>>
>> The next time I saw the great niece as a year and a half later. She was
>> sitting across the table from me at a brunch buffet. I saw her pack away
>> bacon, ham, eggs, lobster, shrimp, roast beef. It struck me strange that it
>> was a real PITA to have to run around in the midst of preparing a large
>> dinner to try to find vegan food for her, but at a buffet where there were
>> lots of meatless options and other people to cater to her, she could fill
>> herself up with meat.
>>


The wife of a friend of mine claims to be allergic to practically
everything... UNLESS it's in something she likes!.....
She'll speak tirelessly about how she's allergic to tomatoes.. and eat
spaghetti ,, pizza,, ,,, etc.. but if it's on her sandwich... you'll
have to throw the whole thing away because it might have a drop of
tomato juice on it.. Same thing for garlic... If something contains
garlic,,, including something real obvious as garlic toast.. she's
ok.... But refuses to eat something like chicken cooked in garlic
because she's allergic to it..

Orders from menu things that spell out what's included in the dish..
and waits till it's placed in front of her to then list the things she
can't have "touch" her food...and sends it back to be re done
She eats a LOT of spit...

All this just to be the center of attention..
You'd expect it from the younger crowd.. but she hasn't outgrown it..
she's now in the mid to late 30's..

Chuck (in SC)
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Nathalie Chiva
 
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On Sun, 15 Jan 2006 16:30:50 -0500, Julia Altshuler
> wrote:

>I'm starting to notice something disturbing with the parents of some of
>the older kids. Sometimes the kid will be in the 11-12-13 year old
>range. The parents are right there. I'll offer the cheese to the
>parent first. (I don't too much care if I serve men or women first, but
>I'm careful to serve elders before young folk. This isn't a rule of the
>store, but it works for me.) Sometimes the parents will offer to the
>kids, and that's fine. But sometimes the parents will let their kids
>talk to me directly about anything else, but when it comes to food, they
>answer for the children. As in, the kid will smile and act like he's
>considering taking a taste, maybe a little reticent but not turning it
>down, and the parent will say "he doesn't like it," or "you don't like
>that." WTF? Now THAT'S a control issue.


I notice that with guests. Parents will come with their child, I put
on the table the dish I have prepared (let's say, for the sake of
discussion, that it's marinated shrimp), parent will turn to the child
and say "You don't like shrimp". And the same people will complain
about their child's fussy eating.... ahem...
I'm a mean host in those cases. I won't offer anything alternative
unless the parent asks (partly because I'm leaving the education part
to the parent), and then, it will be bread, yogurt, fruit, ready
stuff. I'm not a short-order cook.

Nathalie in Switzerland


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-L.
 
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Nathalie Chiva wrote:
> I notice that with guests. Parents will come with their child, I put
> on the table the dish I have prepared (let's say, for the sake of
> discussion, that it's marinated shrimp), parent will turn to the child
> and say "You don't like shrimp".


It may be that the parent is trying to save the embarassment of the
child spitting the food out and making a rude face/comment, or the
parent doesn't want the child to "waste" food. It's not a tact I take,
but I know parents who do.


> And the same people will complain
> about their child's fussy eating.... ahem...
> I'm a mean host in those cases. I won't offer anything alternative
> unless the parent asks (partly because I'm leaving the education part
> to the parent), and then, it will be bread, yogurt, fruit, ready
> stuff. I'm not a short-order cook.


I ask for food allergies before the event. Other than that, I try to
serve enough variety that everyone should find something that they will
eat. I won't pander to the picky kid, but if their parents want to
fire up my stove and cook them a grilled cheese they are welcome to.
Personally, I think pandering to your children thusly is ridiculous. I
know one child who will eat basicly nothing except scrambled eggs and
plain quesadillas. He is that way because his parents allow him to be.

-L.

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OmManiPadmeOmelet
 
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In article >,
Jo Anne Slaven > wrote:

> >S'mee wrote:

>
> >> But I'm more interested in knowing what kind of fussiness
> >> the rest of you may have to deal with...

>
> My husband will eat freakin' anything. I'm the fussy one.
>
> One thing I can't figure out about my fussiness is that I don't like
> freshwater fish. I love "seafood" (lobster, crab, shrimp, etc), and I
> like sal****er fish (halibut, cod, grouper, snapper, et al), but
> pickerel, trout, and other freshwater fish just all tastes really
> "fishy" to me.
>
> Anyone else have the same fish preferences?
>
> Jo Anne


If the fresh water fish tastes "fishy", it's not fresh. :-)

I always give any fish I buy, fresh or salt water, the "sniff" test
prior to buying it...

The only fish I really do not care for is Salmon. It has a strong,
metallic taste to me.

Altho' the more recent fresh water farmed salmon on the market is ok if
I poach or bake it. It tastes almost like trout.

I'm very adventurous in my feeding habits. While there are a few select
foods I just cannot stand, I'll still try nearly anything once.
--
Om.

"My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
  #103 (permalink)   Report Post  
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OmManiPadmeOmelet
 
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In article >,
Dave Smith > wrote:

> I am not crazy about octopus, but every time I have had it, it has been
> tough and chewy. I didn't mind the taste. I once had it served with a
> spicy sauce in a Molloccan restaurant and it was quite tasty.


IMHO the best Octopus I've eaten has been Sashimi...... ;-d
--
Om.

"My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
  #104 (permalink)   Report Post  
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OmManiPadmeOmelet
 
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In article .com>,
"Sheldon" > wrote:

> OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:
> >
> > NOBODY should be forced or badgered to eat something they don't like!

>
> Oh, it's "Fussy" Eaters... I gotta get new glasses.
>
> Sheldon
>


You ane Wertz. ;-)
--
Om.

"My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
  #105 (permalink)   Report Post  
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OmManiPadmeOmelet
 
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In article >,
The Bubbo > wrote:

> Dave Smith wrote:
> > Christine Dabney wrote:
> >
> >>
> >> I wish I could agree with your opinion, but I can't.
> >>
> >> I have a very good friend who is vegan, and believe me, it is not
> >> about the person, at least in his case.

> >
> > Maybe not in his case. There may be the odd one that is sincere and will
> > stick to it. My problem is that, for most of them, it is a fad diet. It

> makes
> > no difference to me what kind of diet they follow. I just won't cater to it.
> >
> >

>
> I've had a few vegan friends and all of them were very good about being
> responsible for their own food. I never ever mind cooking vegan, that's not an
> issue, but for other situations they would bring their own food.
>
> The only time it was a problem was when I was traveling with a vegetarian and
> a vegan and we were in Vicksburg, MS. I'd been adamant that they plan ahead
> for the times we had to stop to eat and find restaurants that they could eat
> at. We knew that on that day we would be in Vicksburg for lunch and no one had
> planned ahead, so we sat in the car getting crankier and cranker trying to
> find a place to eat.
>
> And the one time it irritated me was on the same trip, there were so many
> places in New Orleans I wanted to eat at and I couldn't because they didn't
> have vegan options. Being out-voted by them was kind of irritating.


Oh for pity sake!
I've never seen a restaraunt one that did not have a separate salad
menu, and veggie side orders! (a-la carte options).
--
Om.

"My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson


  #106 (permalink)   Report Post  
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Dave Smith
 
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Chuck wrote:

> >everything. I had horrible Italian food in Germany, over priced food at prime
> >tourist areas in Paris and was outvoted on more interesting places. The next time
> >I was over there I located some of the places I missed out on during the previous
> >group trip, which is the last group trip for me. Never again.

> Italian food...... in Germany? You're pulling our collective leg
> aren't you?


I wish I was kidding. If you think that was bad, we went to an Irish pub in Paris.

No more group trips for me.


  #107 (permalink)   Report Post  
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Dave Smith
 
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Chuck wrote:

>
>
> Orders from menu things that spell out what's included in the dish..
> and waits till it's placed in front of her to then list the things she
> can't have "touch" her food...and sends it back to be re done
> She eats a LOT of spit...


Hasn't anyone told her what happens to food that is sent back for silly reasons :-)

>
> All this just to be the center of attention..
> You'd expect it from the younger crowd.. but she hasn't outgrown it..
> she's now in the mid to late 30's..


So people seem to think that everyone is there to wait on them personally.
My previously talked about niece, the hog, not the vegan, loves to send people on
errands. My father in law used to take the whole family to one of his clubs for a
Christmas family luncheon. He arranged for seating in a private room. It was a
brunch buffet and waiters brought beverages. The waiter came around to serve
coffee. The niece wants tea. He brings tea. There is cream and sugar on the table,
but she wants milk. He brings a pitcher of milk. She sends him for a glass of
juice. He comes back with her juice and she asks for a glass of milk. He brings the
milk and then she asked for a glass of water. I never saw the waiter again. He had
the good sense to see what was going on and buggered off. I didn't blame him, but I
was ticked off that we no longer had a waiter.


  #108 (permalink)   Report Post  
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Nancy Young
 
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"Dave Smith" > wrote

> So people seem to think that everyone is there to wait on them personally.
> My previously talked about niece, the hog, not the vegan, loves to send
> people on
> errands. My father in law used to take the whole family to one of his
> clubs for a
> Christmas family luncheon. He arranged for seating in a private room. It
> was a
> brunch buffet and waiters brought beverages. The waiter came around to
> serve
> coffee. The niece wants tea. He brings tea. There is cream and sugar on
> the table,
> but she wants milk. He brings a pitcher of milk. She sends him for a glass
> of
> juice. He comes back with her juice and she asks for a glass of milk. He
> brings the
> milk and then she asked for a glass of water. I never saw the waiter
> again. He had
> the good sense to see what was going on and buggered off. I didn't blame
> him, but I
> was ticked off that we no longer had a waiter.


I do so miss stories of your niece the hog, no lie. Always good for
amusement. There's something mean about that, what can I say.
Having to deal with people like that myself, I wouldn't find it so funny.
Too bad she confuses irritating people with getting attention. I've
seen it, too ... luckily no one I'm stuck with, as in family.

nancy


  #109 (permalink)   Report Post  
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Dave Smith
 
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Nancy Young wrote:

> I do so miss stories of your niece the hog, no lie. Always good for
> amusement. There's something mean about that, what can I say.
> Having to deal with people like that myself, I wouldn't find it so funny.
> Too bad she confuses irritating people with getting attention. I've
> seen it, too ... luckily no one I'm stuck with, as in family.


If I had any brains I would start being nicer to her. She was upset that he
co-workers wouldn't let her in on the office lottery pool, so she went out and
bought her own lottery ticket and won a million. She used to be just fat and
obnoxious. Now she is fat, obnoxious and rich.


  #110 (permalink)   Report Post  
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Dave Smith wrote:
> Chuck wrote:
>
> > >everything. I had horrible Italian food in Germany, over priced food at prime
> > >tourist areas in Paris and was outvoted on more interesting places. The next time
> > >I was over there I located some of the places I missed out on during the previous
> > >group trip, which is the last group trip for me. Never again.

> > Italian food...... in Germany? You're pulling our collective leg
> > aren't you?

>
> I wish I was kidding. If you think that was bad, we went to an Irish pub in Paris.


Sounds okay to me. the French beer I've had was not all that good. Of
course if you went for the food that's another matter. Not to knock
Irish food, I have eaten very well in Ireland but it seems silly to eat
Irish food when in Paris. OTOH there is/was a good Indian restaurant
near the Ecole Milaire metro.

John Kane, Kingston ON Canada



  #111 (permalink)   Report Post  
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wrote:
> >. But I'm more interested in knowing what kind of fussiness
> >the rest of you may have to deal with...

>
> My wife's 35-year-old brother is digusting. He still doesn't eat ANY
> vegetables, has to special-order everything (no onions, no pickles, no
> sausage, no this, no that).
>
> On Thanksgiving we made a delicious sage stuffing with apples and
> sausage. His mommy brought along a pot of Stove Top Stuffing so that
> her honey would have something he likes.
>
> GAG!
>
> My wife and I love to cook, we eat a large variety of things, and
> expose our kids (7 and 8) to those things. Yet they remain fussy
> eaters....to the point that more often than not, they go to bed hungry
> because they simply refuse to eat what we make.
>
> We finally got sick of either making 2 meals or making "kid" food.
> Now we make good food that we consider normal fare, and if they don't
> like it, too bad.
>
> When I was a kid my mom NEVER made us something else like chicken
> nuggets or fish sticks just because we "didn't like" what she made.
>
> Side note: Our friends have the opposite problem. They raised their
> kids to eat everything very early on, and now every time they go out
> the kids want lobster and steamed mussels. :-)


My sister brought up her kids the same way. This can be a very
dangerous thing for the pocket book. I can remember their great uncle
taking them to dinner and being a bit shocked when the oldest (10-12
yr?) started with escargot and proceeded down the menu from there.

  #112 (permalink)   Report Post  
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Chuck
 
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On 16 Jan 2006 08:12:20 -0800, "
> wrote:

>
>Dave Smith wrote:
>> Chuck wrote:
>>
>> > >everything. I had horrible Italian food in Germany, over priced food at prime
>> > >tourist areas in Paris and was outvoted on more interesting places. The next time
>> > >I was over there I located some of the places I missed out on during the previous
>> > >group trip, which is the last group trip for me. Never again.
>> > Italian food...... in Germany? You're pulling our collective leg
>> > aren't you?

>>
>> I wish I was kidding. If you think that was bad, we went to an Irish pub in Paris.

>
>Sounds okay to me. the French beer I've had was not all that good. Of
>course if you went for the food that's another matter. Not to knock
>Irish food, I have eaten very well in Ireland but it seems silly to eat
>Irish food when in Paris. OTOH there is/was a good Indian restaurant
>near the Ecole Milaire metro.
>
>John Kane, Kingston ON Canada


I'm a pilot.. so I do a LOT of eating out in various parts of the
country.. I have a co-worker (ADULT) that loves Mcdonalds... and says
that "no mater what part of the country you're in the Mcdonalds food
is all the same" And he means that in a GOOD way!
To me.. "when in Rome.." (I had alligator for the first time a couple
weeks ago in Baton Rouge)
I wish I was a picky eater... I'd weigh a lot less.. (unless all I ate
was potato chips..)
Chuck (inSC)
  #113 (permalink)   Report Post  
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Nancy Young
 
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"Dave Smith" > wrote

> Nancy Young wrote:
>
>> I do so miss stories of your niece the hog, no lie.


> If I had any brains I would start being nicer to her. She was upset that
> he
> co-workers wouldn't let her in on the office lottery pool, so she went out
> and
> bought her own lottery ticket and won a million. She used to be just fat
> and
> obnoxious. Now she is fat, obnoxious and rich.


Heh, if you ever took or borrowed a dime from someone like
that, would be the most expensive money you ever got.

Pretty sad, people she worked with wouldn't let her go in
on a lottery ticket, yikes. She does have ... issues.

nancy


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Gregory Morrow
 
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Default Fussy Eaters


OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:

> In article .com>,
> "Sheldon" > wrote:
>
> > OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:
> > >
> > > NOBODY should be forced or badgered to eat something they don't like!

> >
> > Oh, it's "Fussy" Eaters... I gotta get new glasses.
> >
> > Sheldon
> >

>
> You ane Wertz. ;-)



It's like that "Meat In Broad" thread from a whiles back )

--
Best
Greg



  #116 (permalink)   Report Post  
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OmManiPadmeOmelet
 
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In article . com>,
"Gregory Morrow" > wrote:

> OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:
>
> > In article .com>,
> > "Sheldon" > wrote:
> >
> > > OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:
> > > >
> > > > NOBODY should be forced or badgered to eat something they don't like!
> > >
> > > Oh, it's "Fussy" Eaters... I gotta get new glasses.
> > >
> > > Sheldon
> > >

> >
> > You and Wertz. ;-)

>
>
> It's like that "Meat In Broad" thread from a whiles back )


I'm wondering if it's possible to ever really separate food and sex. <G>
--
Om.

"My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
  #117 (permalink)   Report Post  
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The Bubbo
 
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OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:
> In article >,
> The Bubbo > wrote:
>
>> Dave Smith wrote:
>> > Christine Dabney wrote:
>> >
>> >>
>> >> I wish I could agree with your opinion, but I can't.
>> >>
>> >> I have a very good friend who is vegan, and believe me, it is not
>> >> about the person, at least in his case.
>> >
>> > Maybe not in his case. There may be the odd one that is sincere and will
>> > stick to it. My problem is that, for most of them, it is a fad diet. It

>> makes
>> > no difference to me what kind of diet they follow. I just won't cater to

it.
>> >
>> >

>>
>> I've had a few vegan friends and all of them were very good about being
>> responsible for their own food. I never ever mind cooking vegan, that's not

an
>> issue, but for other situations they would bring their own food.
>>
>> The only time it was a problem was when I was traveling with a vegetarian

and
>> a vegan and we were in Vicksburg, MS. I'd been adamant that they plan ahead
>> for the times we had to stop to eat and find restaurants that they could

eat
>> at. We knew that on that day we would be in Vicksburg for lunch and no one

had
>> planned ahead, so we sat in the car getting crankier and cranker trying to
>> find a place to eat.
>>
>> And the one time it irritated me was on the same trip, there were so many
>> places in New Orleans I wanted to eat at and I couldn't because they didn't
>> have vegan options. Being out-voted by them was kind of irritating.

>
> Oh for pity sake!
> I've never seen a restaraunt one that did not have a separate salad
> menu, and veggie side orders! (a-la carte options).


yeah, i thought that would be an option too, but I was wrong. The vegan was a
hardcore marathon runner and weightlifter (though he had to be careful to keep
his muscle lean and not get bulky or he couldn't run). He needed huge amounts
of protein daily and vegetables just didn't cut it. I was truly of the opinion
that he should have brought more clif bars with him at that point.

actually, the more I think about that trip thoe more irritated I get with him
and it has less to do with food.

--
..:Heather:.
www.velvet-c.com
Step off, beyotches, I'm the roflpimp!
  #118 (permalink)   Report Post  
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S'mee
 
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One time on Usenet, "Cindy Hamilton" > said:
> Jo Anne Slaven wrote:
> > >S'mee wrote:

> >
> > >> But I'm more interested in knowing what kind of fussiness
> > >> the rest of you may have to deal with...

> >
> > My husband will eat freakin' anything. I'm the fussy one.
> >
> > One thing I can't figure out about my fussiness is that I don't like
> > freshwater fish. I love "seafood" (lobster, crab, shrimp, etc), and I
> > like sal****er fish (halibut, cod, grouper, snapper, et al), but
> > pickerel, trout, and other freshwater fish just all tastes really
> > "fishy" to me.
> >
> > Anyone else have the same fish preferences?

>
> Me. Freshwater fish just tastes muddy to me. I prefer the slightly
> briny flavor of ocean-going critters.


I agree -- they're naturally packaged with their own seasoning... :-)


--
Jani in WA (S'mee)
~ mom, Trollop, novice cook ~
  #119 (permalink)   Report Post  
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kalanamak
 
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Dave Smith wrote:
We went to
> the places where we wanted to go and ate in the restaurants where we wanted to eat, and
> we didn't waste an hour or two each day waiting for other people.
>

Who travels fastest, travels alone.
  #120 (permalink)   Report Post  
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Lisa Ann
 
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"Chuck" > wrote in message
...
> On Sun, 15 Jan 2006 22:24:16 -0500, Dave Smith
> > wrote:
>
> >The Bubbo wrote:
> >
> >> And the one time it irritated me was on the same trip, there were so

many
> >> places in New Orleans I wanted to eat at and I couldn't because they

didn't
> >> have vegan options. Being out-voted by them was kind of irritating.

> >
> >I can't blame the vegans totally for that. A few years ago went on a

trip to
> >Europe with two brothers and their wives and I got outvoted on just about
> >everything. I had horrible Italian food in Germany, over priced food at

prime
> >tourist areas in Paris and was outvoted on more interesting places. The

next time
> >I was over there I located some of the places I missed out on during the

previous
> >group trip, which is the last group trip for me. Never again.



> Italian food...... in Germany? You're pulling our collective leg
> aren't you?


Sadly, I believe her. My brother went to France 10 years ago on business.
I was insanely jealous (can someone tell me why I'm the one who majored in
foreign languages, but will apparently be the last in my family to get to
Europe?), and quizzed him when he got back. "The food there sucks," he
informed me. He went on to explain that his boss, their French contact and
he had "gone out for a large pizza and 3 Pepsis, and it cost over 50 bucks!
And the pizza sucked!" He explained that he had assumed they'd have *great*
pizza in France, because it's so close to Italy. "Hell, we're clear across
the ocean and we got us some great pizza here!"

Luckily, he ate German food in Germany - he didn't really care for it, he
said, but any country who makes beer that good doesn't need good food. He
actually *liked* English food when he was in England; said he never wanted
to see potatoes again after time in Scotland and Ireland (but again, the
beer was good). Nearly starved to death in China, but at least was polite
about it.

After the trip to France, I started demanding DNA tests. I just *know* my
parents brought the wrong baby home - there's no way we're related!

Lisa Ann


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