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  #16 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 16-12-2005, 09:18 AM posted to rec.food.cooking,uk.food+drink.misc
The Reid
 
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Default Venison

Following up to Peter Ward

Most of the things I do with venison seem to involve chocolate
and a little chilli. Parsnips are often included and sometimes
black beans. I have a regular supply of venison sausages which
seem to go well with broad beans and some root vegetables.


Do tell more. I love chicken mole, and hope to get some venison next
week. Your idea starts excellently, goes downhill slightly in the
middle and improves again towards the end (I detest parsnips).


nothing complex, I just add a little chocolate/chilli mix from a
jar (proprietary but Waitrose stopped doing it so home made next
time) to a stew, I do the same with chilli con carne. I keep
meaning to make mole. Somebody posted a recipe a while ago.

Actually, thinking about your avowed preference for savoury over sweet
(elsewhere), I'm surprised at the parsnips. It's their excessive
sweetness I don't like. I don't like sweet potatoes for the same
reason, and carrots are not very well favoured here, either.


I don't mind a bit of sweetness, I often add fruit to game main
courses, various berries work well with venison BTW. If calories
didnt exist I would probably be eating desserts (in fact I'd
probably be eating all the time!), but as they do puddings were
the first to go (no, snack bars were the first to go) . Sort of
cost/benefit analysis. I've enjoyed steamed pudding with golden
syrup and a bottle of Sauterne in the days I was running 40 miles
a week, but not now! :-(
Come to think of it sweet veg are amongst my favourites (inc
carrots and s pots), so perhaps they satisfy a need for sugar?
Although I once took advice to add honey to cooking parsnips,
that was OTT.
--
Mike Reid
Walk-eat-photos UK "http://www.fellwalk.co.uk" -- you can email [email protected] this site
Walk-eat-photos Spain "http://www.fell-walker.co.uk" -- [email protected] all, it's a spamtrap

  #17 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 16-12-2005, 09:18 AM posted to rec.food.cooking,uk.food+drink.misc
The Reid
 
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Following up to graham

Rent the Mexican movie: "Like water for chocolate". It'll put a whole new
spin on your cooking:-)


If you liked the film read the book too, if I understood the film
correctly, a different ending.
--
Mike Reid
Walk-eat-photos UK "http://www.fellwalk.co.uk" -- you can email [email protected] this site
Walk-eat-photos Spain "http://www.fell-walker.co.uk" -- [email protected] all, it's a spamtrap
  #18 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 16-12-2005, 09:18 AM posted to rec.food.cooking,uk.food+drink.misc
The Reid
 
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Following up to sarah

I agree about the problem of sweetness in veg, although I find parsnips
bearable: I think the parsnip flavour is sufficiently strong to mute the
sweetness. Cooked carrots are definitely too sweet, especially if
additional sugar is added.


Why would anybody add sugar to carrots?

I have to ask the reverse question of you two. If you both like
desserts, how come you don't like sweet veg?
--
Mike Reid
Walk-eat-photos UK "http://www.fellwalk.co.uk" -- you can email [email protected] this site
Walk-eat-photos Spain "http://www.fell-walker.co.uk" -- [email protected] all, it's a spamtrap
  #19 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 16-12-2005, 09:18 AM posted to rec.food.cooking,uk.food+drink.misc
The Reid
 
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Following up to EastneyEnder

Not sure about the chocolate and chilli though. I have had Hare in chocolate
sauce and wasn't convinced, and I prefer things like ginger for heat, having
had my tastebuds burned out by chilli once too often. For me, chilli heat
now tends to mask more subtle flavours.


subtlety is the thing. Think Italian use of chilli, not Indian. I
don't use a mass of chocolate either, its just in the background.

Not that I don't like a blazing curry now and again.
--
Mike Reid
Walk-eat-photos UK "http://www.fellwalk.co.uk" -- you can email [email protected] this site
Walk-eat-photos Spain "http://www.fell-walker.co.uk" -- [email protected] all, it's a spamtrap
  #20 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 16-12-2005, 11:12 AM posted to rec.food.cooking,uk.food+drink.misc
June Hughes
 
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In message , The Reid
writes
Following up to sarah

I agree about the problem of sweetness in veg, although I find parsnips
bearable: I think the parsnip flavour is sufficiently strong to mute the
sweetness. Cooked carrots are definitely too sweet, especially if
additional sugar is added.


Why would anybody add sugar to carrots?

To caramelize them. No-one here likes that, so I don't bother.

--
June Hughes


  #21 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 16-12-2005, 12:39 PM posted to rec.food.cooking,uk.food+drink.misc
sarah
 
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The Reid wrote:

Following up to sarah

I agree about the problem of sweetness in veg, although I find parsnips
bearable: I think the parsnip flavour is sufficiently strong to mute the
sweetness. Cooked carrots are definitely too sweet, especially if
additional sugar is added.


Why would anybody add sugar to carrots?

I have to ask the reverse question of you two. If you both like
desserts, how come you don't like sweet veg?


I like some sweet veg, but it's got to be something with flavour to
over-ride the sweetness. Cooked carrots are vaguely carroty, vaguely
sweet. Adding sugar makes it worse. Yuck. Put them in a carrot cake if
you want to eat sweet carrots. Parsnips taste more of parsnip than
sweet, so that's alright. Sweet potatoes are close to too bland, but I
like the flavour so that's alright -- and I don't add extra sugar.
Sweet-and-sour red cabbage is lovely; definitely sweet, but with vinegar
and spices. Same for venison in a vaguely sweet sauce. Sweetcorn is
sweet, but I like it with lots of salty butter for contrast.

regards
sarah


--
Think of it as evolution in action.
  #22 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 16-12-2005, 01:41 PM posted to rec.food.cooking,uk.food+drink.misc
Shaun aRe
 
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"sarah" wrote in message
...
graham wrote:

"sarah" wrote in message
. ..

[-]

Incidentally, I've always ended up spending ages picking deer hair out
of the packed venison stewing cuts; I don't know how so much gets in
there, but it's not nice and soft and relatively un-noticeable like

cat
hair :-))

I knew that you love cats but you eat 'em too?:-)


Only the hair. That I know of!


You mean there's actually a /possibility/ you accidentally swallowed a
cat?!?



Shaun aRe


  #23 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 16-12-2005, 06:11 PM posted to rec.food.cooking,uk.food+drink.misc
sarah
 
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Shaun aRe wrote:

"sarah" wrote in message
...
graham wrote:

"sarah" wrote in message
. ..

[-]

Incidentally, I've always ended up spending ages picking deer hair out
of the packed venison stewing cuts; I don't know how so much gets in
there, but it's not nice and soft and relatively un-noticeable like
cat hair :-))

I knew that you love cats but you eat 'em too?:-)


Only the hair. That I know of!


You mean there's actually a /possibility/ you accidentally swallowed a
cat?!?


Just think of that, she swallowed a cat!

chorus, please...


I *think* that the stories of cheap restaurants serving cat in lieu of
rabbit are probably urban myths, but I can't be sure. Years ago, when I
lived in Canada, a zoologist friend of a friend was said to have found a
cat forelimb bone in a rabbit stew (the limb bones are diagnostic -- no
possibility of error). Of course that was Canada ;-)

regards
sarah


--
Think of it as evolution in action.
  #24 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 16-12-2005, 07:41 PM posted to rec.food.cooking,uk.food+drink.misc
graham
 
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"sarah" wrote in message
. ..
Shaun aRe wrote:

"sarah" wrote in message
...
graham wrote:

"sarah" wrote in message
. ..
[-]

Incidentally, I've always ended up spending ages picking deer hair
out
of the packed venison stewing cuts; I don't know how so much gets
in
there, but it's not nice and soft and relatively un-noticeable like
cat hair :-))

I knew that you love cats but you eat 'em too?:-)

Only the hair. That I know of!


You mean there's actually a /possibility/ you accidentally swallowed a
cat?!?


Just think of that, she swallowed a cat!

chorus, please...


I *think* that the stories of cheap restaurants serving cat in lieu of
rabbit are probably urban myths, but I can't be sure. Years ago, when I
lived in Canada, a zoologist friend of a friend was said to have found a
cat forelimb bone in a rabbit stew (the limb bones are diagnostic -- no
possibility of error). Of course that was Canada ;-)

The daughter of a close friend served up one of the farm cats to her sister!
Of course, this is Canada;-)
Graham


  #25 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 16-12-2005, 08:19 PM posted to rec.food.cooking,uk.food+drink.misc
sarah
 
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graham wrote:

"sarah" wrote in message
. ..
Shaun aRe wrote:

"sarah" wrote in message
...
graham wrote:


[-]
I knew that you love cats but you eat 'em too?:-)

Only the hair. That I know of!

You mean there's actually a /possibility/ you accidentally swallowed a
cat?!?


Just think of that, she swallowed a cat!

chorus, please...


I *think* that the stories of cheap restaurants serving cat in lieu of
rabbit are probably urban myths, but I can't be sure. Years ago, when I
lived in Canada, a zoologist friend of a friend was said to have found a
cat forelimb bone in a rabbit stew (the limb bones are diagnostic -- no
possibility of error). Of course that was Canada ;-)

The daughter of a close friend served up one of the farm cats to her sister!
Of course, this is Canada;-)


Tell me you're joking. Or tell me why :-)

regards
sarah


--
Think of it as evolution in action.


  #26 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 16-12-2005, 08:24 PM posted to rec.food.cooking,uk.food+drink.misc
Bob Terwilliger
 
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sarah wrote:

Just think of that, she swallowed a cat!

chorus, please...


*groan*


I *think* that the stories of cheap restaurants serving cat in lieu of
rabbit are probably urban myths, but I can't be sure. Years ago, when I
lived in Canada, a zoologist friend of a friend was said to have found a
cat forelimb bone in a rabbit stew (the limb bones are diagnostic -- no
possibility of error). Of course that was Canada ;-)


Several years ago, an uproar ensued because stileproject.com (purveyors of
filth that they are) displayed a video of a kitten being killed, gutted,
skinned, and cooked. Might still have it...OK, here it is, but you've been
warned about the video, so if you watch it and it offends you, don't
complain to ME about it.

http://www.stileproject.com/kitty.html

Bob


  #27 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 16-12-2005, 09:18 PM posted to rec.food.cooking,uk.food+drink.misc
Peter Ward
 
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On Fri, 16 Dec 2005 09:18:16 +0000, The Reid
posted....

Following up to sarah

I agree about the problem of sweetness in veg, although I find parsnips
bearable: I think the parsnip flavour is sufficiently strong to mute the
sweetness. Cooked carrots are definitely too sweet, especially if
additional sugar is added.


Why would anybody add sugar to carrots?

I have to ask the reverse question of you two. If you both like
desserts, how come you don't like sweet veg?


Ah, well, it's not just the sweetness, I suppose. I like sweet corn,
f'rinstance, but that's tasty as well as sweet, to me. Anyway, they
can also be a carrier for butter, drool. But parsnips and sweet
potatoes are just so overloaded with sugar I find them unbearable. I
suppose, also, that I just don't like the underlying parsnip flavour,
and sweet potatoes don't seem to have any underlying flavour at all.

--

Peter

I'm an alien
  #28 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 16-12-2005, 09:18 PM posted to rec.food.cooking,uk.food+drink.misc
Peter Ward
 
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On Fri, 16 Dec 2005 09:18:16 +0000, The Reid
posted....

I don't mind a bit of sweetness, I often add fruit to game main
courses, various berries work well with venison BTW. If calories
didnt exist I would probably be eating desserts (in fact I'd
probably be eating all the time!), but as they do puddings were
the first to go (no, snack bars were the first to go) . Sort of
cost/benefit analysis. I've enjoyed steamed pudding with golden
syrup and a bottle of Sauterne in the days I was running 40 miles
a week, but not now! :-(


This puts a different slant on your disavowal of puds.

I like fruit with meat, but as a flavouring, sometimes part of a
stuffing, not as a major component. I quite like a nice, sweet korma.
Fried onions are quite sweet, but so delicious. As mentioned
elsewhere, parsnips and sweet potatoes seem to be so overwhelmingly
sweet to me that they are unpalatable. And, of course, I am
experimenting with making some puds less sweet.

You know, the more I think about this, the less logic there seems to
be.

Come to think of it sweet veg are amongst my favourites (inc
carrots and s pots), so perhaps they satisfy a need for sugar?
Although I once took advice to add honey to cooking parsnips,
that was OTT.


Eugh!

But ham coated with brown sugar and roasted is superb stuff. Possibly
because the sweetness is set against the ham itself.

--

Peter

I'm an alien
  #29 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 16-12-2005, 10:23 PM posted to rec.food.cooking,uk.food+drink.misc
graham
 
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"sarah" wrote in message
...
graham wrote:

"sarah" wrote in message
. ..
Shaun aRe wrote:

"sarah" wrote in message
...
graham wrote:


[-]
I knew that you love cats but you eat 'em too?:-)

Only the hair. That I know of!

You mean there's actually a /possibility/ you accidentally swallowed a
cat?!?

Just think of that, she swallowed a cat!

chorus, please...


I *think* that the stories of cheap restaurants serving cat in lieu of
rabbit are probably urban myths, but I can't be sure. Years ago, when I
lived in Canada, a zoologist friend of a friend was said to have found
a
cat forelimb bone in a rabbit stew (the limb bones are diagnostic -- no
possibility of error). Of course that was Canada ;-)

The daughter of a close friend served up one of the farm cats to her
sister!
Of course, this is Canada;-)


Tell me you're joking. Or tell me why :-)

The victim was a sentimental soul and the perp wasn't, being the one who
always drove the animals to the abattoir. She saw it as a practical joke
when the cat was severely injured and had to be put down.
I think we ought to change the subject, don't you?
Graham


  #30 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 17-12-2005, 02:21 AM posted to rec.food.cooking,uk.food+drink.misc
Elaine Jones
 
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Quoting from message
posted on 14 Dec 2005 by EastneyEnder
I would like to add:


I was going to fling it (the venison!!!) in a pot and make a casserole /
daube/ whatever but thought it deserved better as it's not daily fare here
in "Olde Portsmouthe".


Somewhere recently I read (can't rememer whether it was on the web or
in a book) that one should not serve brussels sprouts with venison.

I don't know whether this was a style guide/etiquette reference or to
do with a possible physical reaction; has any one else heard of this?


--
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