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The Reid
 
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Default Venison

Following up to graham

>The victim was a sentimental soul and the perp wasn't, being the one who
>always drove the animals to the abattoir. She saw it as a practical joke
>when the cat was severely injured and had to be put down.
>I think we ought to change the subject, don't you?


To Titus Andronicus?
--
Mike Reid
Walk-eat-photos UK "http://www.fellwalk.co.uk" <-- you can email us@ this site
Walk-eat-photos Spain "http://www.fell-walker.co.uk" <-- dontuse@ all, it's a spamtrap
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The Reid
 
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Default Venison

Following up to sarah

>Sweetcorn is
>sweet, but I like it with lots of salty butter for contrast.


that's one I don't like at all. I'm not convinced its even food.
--
Mike Reid
Walk-eat-photos UK "http://www.fellwalk.co.uk" <-- you can email us@ this site
Walk-eat-photos Spain "http://www.fell-walker.co.uk" <-- dontuse@ all, it's a spamtrap
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sarah
 
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The Reid > wrote:

> Following up to sarah
>
> >Sweetcorn is
> >sweet, but I like it with lots of salty butter for contrast.

>
> that's one I don't like at all. I'm not convinced its even food.


I won't try to convince you; all the more for meeeeeee! I hope to grow
it one day, because every hour between plant and table decreases the
flavour and sweetness.

When I lost both my upper front milkteeth at the same time I couldn't
talk without whistling and people laughed at me. My mother cooked my
favourite meal to cheer my up... yes, sweetcorn. And being
NorthAmerican, I usually ate mine without benefit of knife and fork. I
think I burst into tears and ran from the table!

regards
sarah


--
Think of it as evolution in action.
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sarah
 
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Default Venison

The Reid > wrote:

> Following up to Peter Ward
>
> >I like fruit with meat, but as a flavouring, sometimes part of a
> >stuffing, not as a major component. I quite like a nice, sweet korma.
> >Fried onions are quite sweet, but so delicious. As mentioned
> >elsewhere, parsnips and sweet potatoes seem to be so overwhelmingly
> >sweet to me that they are unpalatable. And, of course, I am
> >experimenting with making some puds less sweet.
> >
> >You know, the more I think about this, the less logic there seems to
> >be.

>
> LOL, I'm putting sweet veg in my main couse and not eating
> dessert, youre having desserts but no sweet veg! Its just taste,
> isnt it? And calories of course. How about a parsnip dessert?


I bet there are lots of WWII recipes for it. I find the thought of
parsnip flavoured dessert rather off-putting (it's such a strong,
distinctive flavour), but I suppose if it was highly spiced, cinnamon,
nutmeg, a few raisins... it could be alright.

Speaking (as it were) of parsnips, does anyone else find that one or two
of them seem to leave the mouth/tongue/lips slightly numb? I know it's
in the same family as some rather nasty plants; I just wondered if some
roots contain a higher concentration of something. Or perhaps it's my
first food allergy!

regards
sarah

--
Think of it as evolution in action.
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The Reid
 
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Default Venison

Following up to sarah

>> that's one I don't like at all. I'm not convinced its even food.

>
>I won't try to convince you; all the more for meeeeeee! I hope to grow
>it one day, because every hour between plant and table decreases the
>flavour and sweetness.


its easy enough to grow, foxes go for it though.

>When I lost both my upper front milkteeth at the same time I couldn't
>talk without whistling and people laughed at me. My mother cooked my
>favourite meal to cheer my up... yes, sweetcorn. And being
>NorthAmerican, I usually ate mine without benefit of knife and fork. I
>think I burst into tears and ran from the table!


all together ahhhhhhhhhh.
--
Mike Reid
Walk-eat-photos UK "http://www.fellwalk.co.uk" <-- you can email us@ this site
Walk-eat-photos Spain "http://www.fell-walker.co.uk" <-- dontuse@ all, it's a spamtrap


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The Reid
 
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Default Venison

Following up to sarah

>Speaking (as it were) of parsnips, does anyone else find that one or two
>of them seem to leave the mouth/tongue/lips slightly numb? I know it's
>in the same family as some rather nasty plants;


not happened to me but its sap makes your skin hypersensitive to
sunlight, causing burns.
--
Mike Reid
Walk-eat-photos UK "http://www.fellwalk.co.uk" <-- you can email us@ this site
Walk-eat-photos Spain "http://www.fell-walker.co.uk" <-- dontuse@ all, it's a spamtrap
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The Reid
 
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Default beef was Venison

Following up to sarah

>Only regret is that most of it is still in their freezers until we can
>get the wiring to the garage sorted and put a chest freezer in :-(


you really *do* like bulk buying, don't you? Is it you can take
the Canadian out of Canada but you cant take Canada out of the
Canadian? :-)
--
Mike Reid
Walk-eat-photos UK "http://www.fellwalk.co.uk" <-- you can email us@ this site
Walk-eat-photos Spain "http://www.fell-walker.co.uk" <-- dontuse@ all, it's a spamtrap
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sarah
 
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Default beef was Venison

The Reid > wrote:

> Following up to sarah
>
> >Only regret is that most of it is still in their freezers until we can
> >get the wiring to the garage sorted and put a chest freezer in :-(

>
> you really *do* like bulk buying, don't you? Is it you can take
> the Canadian out of Canada but you cant take Canada out of the
> Canadian? :-)


Look, at UKP7/kg, I'll take as much as I think we can eat :-)

regards
sarah

--
Think of it as evolution in action.
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sarah
 
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Default Venison

The Reid > wrote:

> Following up to sarah
>
> >> that's one I don't like at all. I'm not convinced its even food.

> >
> >I won't try to convince you; all the more for meeeeeee! I hope to grow
> >it one day, because every hour between plant and table decreases the
> >flavour and sweetness.

>
> its easy enough to grow, foxes go for it though.
>
> >When I lost both my upper front milkteeth at the same time I couldn't
> >talk without whistling and people laughed at me. My mother cooked my
> >favourite meal to cheer my up... yes, sweetcorn. And being
> >NorthAmerican, I usually ate mine without benefit of knife and fork. I
> >think I burst into tears and ran from the table!

>
> all together ahhhhhhhhhh.


I've just *really* realised all of this has been x-posted to
rec.food.cooking. But no one's commented, so perhaps we're alone in here
:-)

regards
sarah


--
Think of it as evolution in action.
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sarah
 
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Default Venison

The Reid > wrote:

> Following up to sarah
>
> >Speaking (as it were) of parsnips, does anyone else find that one or two
> >of them seem to leave the mouth/tongue/lips slightly numb? I know it's
> >in the same family as some rather nasty plants;

>
> not happened to me but its sap makes your skin hypersensitive to
> sunlight, causing burns.


Yup. I've experimented with that in some of its wild relatives. The
numbness is strange, though. I should ask him if he's noticed it.

regards
sarah


--
Think of it as evolution in action.


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Doctor J. Frink
 
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On Mon, 19 Dec 2005 09:35:53 +0000, sarah > wrote:
>
>Speaking (as it were) of parsnips, does anyone else find that one or two
>of them seem to leave the mouth/tongue/lips slightly numb? I know it's
>in the same family as some rather nasty plants; I just wondered if some
>roots contain a higher concentration of something. Or perhaps it's my
>first food allergy!


I can't say I've experienced any numbness but parsnips do contain toxins
(as lots of veg does), which can cause skin irritation when exposed to
sunlight and possibly upset stomach.

They tend to be in the damaged areas so if you peel the parsnip well and
thoroughly cut out any bruises (if you don't already) it might help.

Frink

--
Doctor J. Frink : 'Rampant Ribald Ringtail'
See his mind here : http://www.cmp.liv.ac.uk/frink/
Annoy his mind here : pjf at cmp dot liv dot ack dot ook
"No sir, I didn't like it!" - Mr Horse
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sarah
 
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Doctor J. Frink > wrote:

> On Mon, 19 Dec 2005 09:35:53 +0000, sarah > wrote:
> >
> >Speaking (as it were) of parsnips, does anyone else find that one or two
> >of them seem to leave the mouth/tongue/lips slightly numb? I know it's
> >in the same family as some rather nasty plants; I just wondered if some
> >roots contain a higher concentration of something. Or perhaps it's my
> >first food allergy!

>
> I can't say I've experienced any numbness but parsnips do contain toxins
> (as lots of veg does), which can cause skin irritation when exposed to
> sunlight and possibly upset stomach.
>
> They tend to be in the damaged areas so if you peel the parsnip well and
> thoroughly cut out any bruises (if you don't already) it might help.


I certainly peel them, but haven't paid close attention to cutting out
all the damaged bits. I know about the skin irritation bit; they (and
many other members of the family) contain a chemical that blocks the
skin's ability to protect itself from the sun. Depending on the
sensitivity of your skin you may not see any reaction from quite
prolonged contact on solidly overcast days, but sunlight leads to a
remarkable burn -- I tested some wild parsnip on my (inner) arm and it
raised blisters 12 hours later. I pity the youngsters who used to use
the stems as peashooters!

regards
sarah

--
Think of it as evolution in action.
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graham
 
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"sarah" > wrote in message
...
> Doctor J. Frink > wrote:
>
>> On Mon, 19 Dec 2005 09:35:53 +0000, sarah > wrote:
>> >
>> >Speaking (as it were) of parsnips, does anyone else find that one or two
>> >of them seem to leave the mouth/tongue/lips slightly numb? I know it's
>> >in the same family as some rather nasty plants; I just wondered if some
>> >roots contain a higher concentration of something. Or perhaps it's my
>> >first food allergy!

>>
>> I can't say I've experienced any numbness but parsnips do contain toxins
>> (as lots of veg does), which can cause skin irritation when exposed to
>> sunlight and possibly upset stomach.
>>
>> They tend to be in the damaged areas so if you peel the parsnip well and
>> thoroughly cut out any bruises (if you don't already) it might help.

>
> I certainly peel them, but haven't paid close attention to cutting out
> all the damaged bits. I know about the skin irritation bit; they (and
> many other members of the family) contain a chemical that blocks the
> skin's ability to protect itself from the sun. Depending on the
> sensitivity of your skin you may not see any reaction from quite
> prolonged contact on solidly overcast days, but sunlight leads to a
> remarkable burn -- I tested some wild parsnip on my (inner) arm and it
> raised blisters 12 hours later. I pity the youngsters who used to use
> the stems as peashooters!
>

Is that a feature of all the Umbellifera?
Graham


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S Viemeister
 
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graham wrote:
>
> "sarah" > wrote
> > I certainly peel them, but haven't paid close attention to cutting out
> > all the damaged bits. I know about the skin irritation bit; they (and
> > many other members of the family) contain a chemical that blocks the
> > skin's ability to protect itself from the sun. Depending on the
> > sensitivity of your skin you may not see any reaction from quite
> > prolonged contact on solidly overcast days, but sunlight leads to a
> > remarkable burn -- I tested some wild parsnip on my (inner) arm and it
> > raised blisters 12 hours later. I pity the youngsters who used to use
> > the stems as peashooters!
> >

> Is that a feature of all the Umbellifera?
>

It's certainly a feature of the Giant Hogweed.
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sarah
 
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graham > wrote:

> "sarah" > wrote in message
> ...
> > Doctor J. Frink > wrote:
> >
> >> On Mon, 19 Dec 2005 09:35:53 +0000, sarah > wrote:
> >> >
> >> >Speaking (as it were) of parsnips, does anyone else find that one or two
> >> >of them seem to leave the mouth/tongue/lips slightly numb? I know it's
> >> >in the same family as some rather nasty plants; I just wondered if some
> >> >roots contain a higher concentration of something. Or perhaps it's my
> >> >first food allergy!
> >>
> >> I can't say I've experienced any numbness but parsnips do contain toxins
> >> (as lots of veg does), which can cause skin irritation when exposed to
> >> sunlight and possibly upset stomach.
> >>
> >> They tend to be in the damaged areas so if you peel the parsnip well and
> >> thoroughly cut out any bruises (if you don't already) it might help.

> >
> > I certainly peel them, but haven't paid close attention to cutting out
> > all the damaged bits. I know about the skin irritation bit; they (and
> > many other members of the family) contain a chemical that blocks the
> > skin's ability to protect itself from the sun. Depending on the
> > sensitivity of your skin you may not see any reaction from quite
> > prolonged contact on solidly overcast days, but sunlight leads to a
> > remarkable burn -- I tested some wild parsnip on my (inner) arm and it
> > raised blisters 12 hours later. I pity the youngsters who used to use
> > the stems as peashooters!
> >

> Is that a feature of all the Umbellifera?


I don't know, but it's possible, perhaps to a lesser extent. The
compounds involved are psoralens and furanocoumarins. There are records
of contact dermatitis suffered by people working with carrots, angelica,
and dill to name some of the more popular plants; others, such as Giant
Hogweed (_Hieraceum mantegazzianum_, from memory!) are very dangerous. I
tested the Wild Parsnip to judge whether the results were sufficiently
severe to have put two lads in hospital with what were diagnosed as
'chemical burns' on their legs. The answer was most definitely 'Yes',
and I'd add I have *never* itched so much from anything before (but then
I don't think I ever encountered Poison Ivy).

regards
sarah


--
Think of it as evolution in action.


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graham
 
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"sarah" > wrote in message
...
> graham > wrote:
>
>> "sarah" > wrote in message
>> ...
>> > Doctor J. Frink > wrote:
>> >
>> >> On Mon, 19 Dec 2005 09:35:53 +0000, sarah >
>> >> wrote:
>> >> >
>> >> >Speaking (as it were) of parsnips, does anyone else find that one or
>> >> >two
>> >> >of them seem to leave the mouth/tongue/lips slightly numb? I know
>> >> >it's
>> >> >in the same family as some rather nasty plants; I just wondered if
>> >> >some
>> >> >roots contain a higher concentration of something. Or perhaps it's my
>> >> >first food allergy!
>> >>
>> >> I can't say I've experienced any numbness but parsnips do contain
>> >> toxins
>> >> (as lots of veg does), which can cause skin irritation when exposed to
>> >> sunlight and possibly upset stomach.
>> >>
>> >> They tend to be in the damaged areas so if you peel the parsnip well
>> >> and
>> >> thoroughly cut out any bruises (if you don't already) it might help.
>> >
>> > I certainly peel them, but haven't paid close attention to cutting out
>> > all the damaged bits. I know about the skin irritation bit; they (and
>> > many other members of the family) contain a chemical that blocks the
>> > skin's ability to protect itself from the sun. Depending on the
>> > sensitivity of your skin you may not see any reaction from quite
>> > prolonged contact on solidly overcast days, but sunlight leads to a
>> > remarkable burn -- I tested some wild parsnip on my (inner) arm and it
>> > raised blisters 12 hours later. I pity the youngsters who used to use
>> > the stems as peashooters!
>> >

>> Is that a feature of all the Umbellifera?

>
> I don't know, but it's possible, perhaps to a lesser extent. The
> compounds involved are psoralens and furanocoumarins. There are records
> of contact dermatitis suffered by people working with carrots, angelica,
> and dill to name some of the more popular plants; others, such as Giant
> Hogweed (_Hieraceum mantegazzianum_, from memory!) are very dangerous. I
> tested the Wild Parsnip to judge whether the results were sufficiently
> severe to have put two lads in hospital with what were diagnosed as
> 'chemical burns' on their legs. The answer was most definitely 'Yes',
> and I'd add I have *never* itched so much from anything before (but then
> I don't think I ever encountered Poison Ivy).
>

I don't recall ever reacting to "Sheep's parsley" as a kid. Until these
posts, I didn't know of these complaints/reactions and the Umbellifera are
such an important source of food, herbs and spices.
Graham


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sarah
 
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graham > wrote:

> "sarah" > wrote in message
> ...
> > graham > wrote:
> >
> >> "sarah" > wrote in message
> >> ...
> >> > Doctor J. Frink > wrote:

[-]
> >> >> I can't say I've experienced any numbness but parsnips do contain
> >> >> toxins (as lots of veg does), which can cause skin irritation when
> >> >> exposed to sunlight and possibly upset stomach.
> >> >>
> >> >> They tend to be in the damaged areas so if you peel the parsnip well
> >> >> and thoroughly cut out any bruises (if you don't already) it might
> >> >> help.
> >> >
> >> > I certainly peel them, but haven't paid close attention to cutting out
> >> > all the damaged bits. I know about the skin irritation bit; they (and
> >> > many other members of the family) contain a chemical that blocks the
> >> > skin's ability to protect itself from the sun. Depending on the
> >> > sensitivity of your skin you may not see any reaction from quite
> >> > prolonged contact on solidly overcast days, but sunlight leads to a
> >> > remarkable burn -- I tested some wild parsnip on my (inner) arm and it
> >> > raised blisters 12 hours later. I pity the youngsters who used to use
> >> > the stems as peashooters!
> >> >
> >> Is that a feature of all the Umbellifera?

> >
> > I don't know, but it's possible, perhaps to a lesser extent. The
> > compounds involved are psoralens and furanocoumarins. There are records
> > of contact dermatitis suffered by people working with carrots, angelica,
> > and dill to name some of the more popular plants; others, such as Giant
> > Hogweed (_Hieraceum mantegazzianum_, from memory!) are very dangerous. I
> > tested the Wild Parsnip to judge whether the results were sufficiently
> > severe to have put two lads in hospital with what were diagnosed as
> > 'chemical burns' on their legs. The answer was most definitely 'Yes',
> > and I'd add I have *never* itched so much from anything before (but then
> > I don't think I ever encountered Poison Ivy).
> >

> I don't recall ever reacting to "Sheep's parsley" as a kid. Until these
> posts, I didn't know of these complaints/reactions and the Umbellifera are
> such an important source of food, herbs and spices.


I've never reacted to carrots or dill -- it's usually people who harvest
or otherwise work with the plants a lot who develop sensitivities.
Hogweed/Wild Parsnip are unusual in the degree and speed of reaction.

regards
sarah


--
Think of it as evolution in action.
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Gregoire Kretz
 
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sarah > wrote:

> The Reid > wrote:
>
> > Following up to sarah
> >
> > >When I lost both my upper front milkteeth at the same time I couldn't
> > >talk without whistling and people laughed at me. My mother cooked my
> > >favourite meal to cheer my up... yes, sweetcorn. And being
> > >NorthAmerican, I usually ate mine without benefit of knife and fork. I
> > >think I burst into tears and ran from the table!

> >
> > all together ahhhhhhhhhh.

>
> I've just *really* realised all of this has been x-posted to
> rec.food.cooking. But no one's commented, so perhaps we're alone in here
> :-)


I think you'll find most posters to both groups have also lost milkteeth
at one point or another in the past.


Greg

--

That time's long past, but what would I not give
To see the whorehouse where we used to live.
No spam: ficus = no(n)
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The Reid
 
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Following up to sarah

>> all together ahhhhhhhhhh.

>
>I've just *really* realised all of this has been x-posted to
>rec.food.cooking. But no one's commented, so perhaps we're alone in here


they don't seem to be saying that much.
--
Mike Reid
Walk-eat-photos UK "http://www.fellwalk.co.uk" <-- you can email us@ this site
Walk-eat-photos Spain "http://www.fell-walker.co.uk" <-- dontuse@ all, it's a spamtrap
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The Reid
 
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Default Venison

Following up to sarah

>> >Speaking (as it were) of parsnips, does anyone else find that one or two
>> >of them seem to leave the mouth/tongue/lips slightly numb? I know it's
>> >in the same family as some rather nasty plants;

>>
>> not happened to me but its sap makes your skin hypersensitive to
>> sunlight, causing burns.

>
>Yup. I've experimented with that in some of its wild relatives. The
>numbness is strange, though. I should ask him if he's noticed it.


Just go easier on the vodka.
--
Mike Reid
Walk-eat-photos UK "http://www.fellwalk.co.uk" <-- you can email us@ this site
Walk-eat-photos Spain "http://www.fell-walker.co.uk" <-- dontuse@ all, it's a spamtrap


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The Reid
 
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Default beef was Venison

Following up to sarah

>Look, at UKP7/kg, I'll take as much as I think we can eat :-)


I thought you would riposte about my wine buying! :*)
--
Mike Reid
Walk-eat-photos UK "http://www.fellwalk.co.uk" <-- you can email us@ this site
Walk-eat-photos Spain "http://www.fell-walker.co.uk" <-- dontuse@ all, it's a spamtrap
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The Reid
 
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Following up to sarah

>I've never reacted to carrots or dill -- it's usually people who harvest
>or otherwise work with the plants a lot who develop sensitivities.
>Hogweed/Wild Parsnip are unusual in the degree and speed of reaction.


all parsnips of course.
I often get umbillifer sap on me on the allotment I should think,
ive had no problem with carrots etc, but then I havent with
parsnip, but then you harvest them in winter. Perhaps i'm
roboallotmenter?
--
Mike Reid
Walk-eat-photos UK "http://www.fellwalk.co.uk" <-- you can email us@ this site
Walk-eat-photos Spain "http://www.fell-walker.co.uk" <-- dontuse@ all, it's a spamtrap
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sarah
 
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Default beef was Venison

The Reid > wrote:

> Following up to sarah
>
> >Look, at UKP7/kg, I'll take as much as I think we can eat :-)

>
> I thought you would riposte about my wine buying! :*)


I wouldn't. 'Tis the season of goodwill and all that. Besides, then we'd
have to decide which of us is kettle and which of us is pot and
precisely how black we are :-)

regards
sarah


--
Think of it as evolution in action.
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sarah
 
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The Reid > wrote:

> Following up to sarah
>
> >> >Speaking (as it were) of parsnips, does anyone else find that one or two
> >> >of them seem to leave the mouth/tongue/lips slightly numb? I know it's
> >> >in the same family as some rather nasty plants;
> >>
> >> not happened to me but its sap makes your skin hypersensitive to
> >> sunlight, causing burns.

> >
> >Yup. I've experimented with that in some of its wild relatives. The
> >numbness is strange, though. I should ask him if he's noticed it.

>
> Just go easier on the vodka.


Haven't got any (as in never had, not none left :-). Just scotch,
brandy, rum, gin and assorted wines, fortified and otherwise.

regards
sarah


--
Think of it as evolution in action.
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sarah
 
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The Reid > wrote:

> Following up to sarah
>
> >I've never reacted to carrots or dill -- it's usually people who harvest
> >or otherwise work with the plants a lot who develop sensitivities.
> >Hogweed/Wild Parsnip are unusual in the degree and speed of reaction.

>
> all parsnips of course.
> I often get umbillifer sap on me on the allotment I should think,
> ive had no problem with carrots etc, but then I havent with
> parsnip, but then you harvest them in winter. Perhaps i'm
> roboallotmenter?


"Terminator <x>: The Allotment Beckons" ?

regards
sarah


--
Think of it as evolution in action.


  #66 (permalink)   Report Post  
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The Reid
 
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Default Venison

Following up to sarah

>Perhaps i'm
>> roboallotmenter?

>
>"Terminator <x>: The Allotment Beckons" ?


its about time Hugh Grant made a film about allotments, I don't
want a gritty northern school of cinema - "life's hard lass and
t'turnips wont grow" type of thing. More soft focus, flowers and
birds, glamorous plot holders and sowing of seed behind the
compost heap.
"Cabbage patch dolls" ?
--
Mike Reid
Walk-eat-photos UK "http://www.fellwalk.co.uk" <-- you can email us@ this site
Walk-eat-photos Spain "http://www.fell-walker.co.uk" <-- dontuse@ all, it's a spamtrap
  #67 (permalink)   Report Post  
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Phil C.
 
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Default Venison

On Mon, 19 Dec 2005 22:18:06 GMT, "graham" > wrote:

>I don't recall ever reacting to "Sheep's parsley" as a kid. Until these
>posts, I didn't know of these complaints/reactions and the Umbellifera are
>such an important source of food, herbs and spices.


As I recall, water parsley is deadly poisonous and hemlock is also one
of the family. Don't try this at home. I wonder if our distant
ancestors had to treat parsnips to detoxify them and gradually bred
the poisons out. Perhaps they were used for "medicinal" properties
before they became ordinary vegetables. But then all sorts of foods
are poisonous if we eat enough, don't prepare them properly or are
unlucky enough to be susceptible. Some beans are well known for
containing arsenic and even potatoes are poisonous if we eat an
unfeasibly large amount. Others may know more.
--
Phil C.
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The Reid
 
Posts: n/a
Default Venison

Following up to Phil C.

>and even potatoes are poisonous if we eat an
>unfeasibly large amount.


especially as chips! :-)
--
Mike Reid
Walk-eat-photos UK "http://www.fellwalk.co.uk" <-- you can email us@ this site
Walk-eat-photos Spain "http://www.fell-walker.co.uk" <-- dontuse@ all, it's a spamtrap
  #69 (permalink)   Report Post  
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sarah
 
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Default Venison

The Reid > wrote:

> Following up to sarah
>
> >Perhaps i'm
> >> roboallotmenter?

> >
> >"Terminator <x>: The Allotment Beckons" ?

>
> its about time Hugh Grant made a film about allotments, I don't
> want a gritty northern school of cinema - "life's hard lass and
> t'turnips wont grow" type of thing. More soft focus, flowers and
> birds, glamorous plot holders and sowing of seed behind the
> compost heap.
> "Cabbage patch dolls" ?


urgh. Not for me. Hugh Grant portrays characters so... ineffectual. How
about something akin to 'Calendar Girls' based on a battle to save the
allotments from an avaricious developer? Just *think* of the
photographic possibilities... M&S ads are nothing by comparison.

regards
sarah


--
Think of it as evolution in action.
  #70 (permalink)   Report Post  
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The Reid
 
Posts: n/a
Default Venison

Following up to sarah

>> "Cabbage patch dolls" ?

>
>urgh. Not for me. Hugh Grant portrays characters so... ineffectual.


I thought north Americans liked him? OK someone else.

>How about something akin to 'Calendar Girls' based on a battle to save the
>allotments from an avaricious developer?


not quite what I'm looking for.

>Just *think* of the
>photographic possibilities...


I was! How about Penelope Cruz and Nicole Kidman as green *******
couple who want to learn to grow their own food, struggle at
first but eventually accept help from old hand whom they slowly
realise they are attracted to, after some inexplicable stuff
about fertility to fool people its art, all three realise a
menage a trois is the way forward and the film ends with lots of
naked rolling about in the crops.
Lets call it "the rakes progress".
I know someone who could play the male lead. Damn, now you know
what I daydream about during all that digging :-)

>M&S ads are nothing by comparison.


M & S? We're up there with Wonderbra.
--
Mike Reid
Walk-eat-photos UK "http://www.fellwalk.co.uk" <-- you can email us@ this site
Walk-eat-photos Spain "http://www.fell-walker.co.uk" <-- dontuse@ all, it's a spamtrap


  #71 (permalink)   Report Post  
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graham
 
Posts: n/a
Default Venison


"The Reid" > wrote in message
...
> Following up to sarah
>
>>> "Cabbage patch dolls" ?

>>
>>urgh. Not for me. Hugh Grant portrays characters so... ineffectual.

>
> I thought north Americans liked him? OK someone else.
>
>>How about something akin to 'Calendar Girls' based on a battle to save the
>>allotments from an avaricious developer?

>
> not quite what I'm looking for.
>
>>Just *think* of the
>>photographic possibilities...

>
> I was! How about Penelope Cruz and Nicole Kidman as green *******
> couple who want to learn to grow their own food, struggle at
> first but eventually accept help from old hand whom they slowly
> realise they are attracted to, after some inexplicable stuff
> about fertility to fool people its art, all three realise a
> menage a trois is the way forward and the film ends with lots of
> naked rolling about in the crops.
> Lets call it "the rakes progress".
> I know someone who could play the male lead. Damn, now you know
> what I daydream about during all that digging :-)
>

Saw a dvd last night featuring the Irish actress Flora Montgomery. Could we
include her as a love interest?
(Note the "we").
Graham


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sarah
 
Posts: n/a
Default Allotment films was Venison

graham > wrote:

> "The Reid" > wrote in message
> ...
> > Following up to sarah
> >
> >>> "Cabbage patch dolls" ?
> >>
> >>urgh. Not for me. Hugh Grant portrays characters so... ineffectual.

> >
> > I thought north Americans liked him? OK someone else.
> >
> >>How about something akin to 'Calendar Girls' based on a battle to save the
> >>allotments from an avaricious developer?

> >
> > not quite what I'm looking for.
> >
> >>Just *think* of the
> >>photographic possibilities...

> >
> > I was! How about Penelope Cruz and Nicole Kidman as green *******
> > couple who want to learn to grow their own food, struggle at
> > first but eventually accept help from old hand whom they slowly
> > realise they are attracted to, after some inexplicable stuff
> > about fertility to fool people its art, all three realise a
> > menage a trois is the way forward and the film ends with lots of
> > naked rolling about in the crops.
> > Lets call it "the rakes progress".
> > I know someone who could play the male lead. Damn, now you know
> > what I daydream about during all that digging :-)
> >

> Saw a dvd last night featuring the Irish actress Flora Montgomery. Could we
> include her as a love interest?
> (Note the "we").


There won't be any vegetables left after all that rolling about :-)

regards
sarah


--
Think of it as evolution in action.
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The Reid
 
Posts: n/a
Default Venison

Following up to graham

>Saw a dvd last night featuring the Irish actress Flora Montgomery. Could we
>include her as a love interest?


How much love interest is this film having? OK, she can be the
leads old flame (that means filming some flashbacks) who turns up
to rent the plot next to you, you can write the rest of the sub
plot!

Actually "carry on up the allotment" would have worked.
--
Mike Reid
Walk-eat-photos UK "http://www.fellwalk.co.uk" <-- you can email us@ this site
Walk-eat-photos Spain "http://www.fell-walker.co.uk" <-- dontuse@ all, it's a spamtrap
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The Reid
 
Posts: n/a
Default Allotment films was Venison

Following up to sarah

>> > I was! How about Penelope Cruz and Nicole Kidman as green *******
>> > couple who want to learn to grow their own food, struggle at
>> > first but eventually accept help from old hand whom they slowly
>> > realise they are attracted to, after some inexplicable stuff
>> > about fertility to fool people its art, all three realise a
>> > menage a trois is the way forward and the film ends with lots of
>> > naked rolling about in the crops.
>> > Lets call it "the rakes progress".
>> > I know someone who could play the male lead. Damn, now you know
>> > what I daydream about during all that digging :-)
>> >

>> Saw a dvd last night featuring the Irish actress Flora Montgomery. Could we
>> include her as a love interest?
>> (Note the "we").


How much love interest is this film having? OK, she can be the
leads old flame (that means filming some flashbacks with me) who
turns up to rent the plot next to you, you can write the rest of
the sub plot which presumably features her taking an interest in
your marrows or something!

>There won't be any vegetables left after all that rolling about :-)


Better, roll about in the fruit.

"carry on up the allotment" would have worked.
--
Mike Reid
Walk-eat-photos UK "http://www.fellwalk.co.uk" <-- you can email us@ this site
Walk-eat-photos Spain "http://www.fell-walker.co.uk" <-- dontuse@ all, it's a spamtrap
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The Reid
 
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Default Allotment films was Venison

Following up to The Reid

>"carry on up the allotment" would have worked.


or "Dig for Victory"
--
Mike Reid
Walk-eat-photos UK "http://www.fellwalk.co.uk" <-- you can email us@ this site
Walk-eat-photos Spain "http://www.fell-walker.co.uk" <-- dontuse@ all, it's a spamtrap


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sarah
 
Posts: n/a
Default Umbellifers was Venison

Phil C. > wrote:

> On Mon, 19 Dec 2005 22:18:06 GMT, "graham" > wrote:
>
> >I don't recall ever reacting to "Sheep's parsley" as a kid. Until these
> >posts, I didn't know of these complaints/reactions and the Umbellifera are
> >such an important source of food, herbs and spices.

>
> As I recall, water parsley is deadly poisonous and hemlock is also one
> of the family. Don't try this at home. I wonder if our distant
> ancestors had to treat parsnips to detoxify them and gradually bred
> the poisons out. Perhaps they were used for "medicinal" properties
> before they became ordinary vegetables. But then all sorts of foods
> are poisonous if we eat enough, don't prepare them properly or are
> unlucky enough to be susceptible. Some beans are well known for
> containing arsenic and even potatoes are poisonous if we eat an
> unfeasibly large amount. Others may know more.


I have some books on the topic, and if I spend any longer working on
*that* document I'll be quite, quite mad...

**NOTE: READ AT YOUR OWN RISK. I AM NOT ADVISING ANYONE TO TRY ANY OF
THIS. ANY PLANT CAN BE HARMFUL WHEN INGESTED. Some EXTREMELY POISONOUS
plants (such as Fool's Parsley) can be easily confused with the
following interesting plants**

Launert (Edible and Medicinal Plants of Britain and Northern Europe)
declares Wild Parsnip to be edible: the root (best collected in late
autumn or winter[1], when it's at its sweetest) should be blanched in
boiling salted water to remove its 'sharp flavour', as should the older
leaves. Young leaves and shoots can be added to soups, roots treated as
carrots (after blanching). Both he and de Rougemont (Crops of Britain
and Europe) place Wild Parsnip in the same Genus and spp as cultivated,
although apparently some people put Wild Parsnip in a separate
subspecies. DR says Parsnip has been cultivated since Roman times, but
'superior forms' probably developed after the Middle Ages.

Interestingly, Launert gives only medicinal uses for Wild Carrot (juice
of the root for nervous or physical exhaustion, dropsy and internal
inflammation; must be taken for long periods), freshly grated roots good
against worms in children, dried powdered root to treat diarrhoea in
babi... excuse me a moment: READ THE NOTE AT THE TOP AGAIN! I have in
fact nibbled on roots of wild carrot without ill effect, but not much
pleasure either. I should try some wild parsnip sometime, but I'd want
to mark the plants in high summer to avoid confusion with the really
nasty relatives.

regards
sarah



[1] Makes sense. Winter/early spring is when people were hungriest, too.


--
Think of it as evolution in action.
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sarah
 
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Default Allotment films was Venison

The Reid > wrote:

> Following up to The Reid
>
> >"carry on up the allotment" would have worked.

>
> or "Dig for Victory"


You *have* been daydreaming, haven't you? :-)

I don't dig it, man, I've got a raised bed. Do I have to smirk when I
type that?

regards
sarah


--
Think of it as evolution in action.
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Phil C.
 
Posts: n/a
Default Umbellifers was Venison

On Tue, 20 Dec 2005 17:35:53 +0000, (sarah)
wrote:

>Phil C. > wrote:
>
>> On Mon, 19 Dec 2005 22:18:06 GMT, "graham" > wrote:
>>
>> >I don't recall ever reacting to "Sheep's parsley" as a kid. Until these
>> >posts, I didn't know of these complaints/reactions and the Umbellifera are
>> >such an important source of food, herbs and spices.

>>
>> As I recall, water parsley is deadly poisonous and hemlock is also one
>> of the family. Don't try this at home. I wonder if our distant
>> ancestors had to treat parsnips to detoxify them and gradually bred
>> the poisons out. Perhaps they were used for "medicinal" properties
>> before they became ordinary vegetables. But then all sorts of foods
>> are poisonous if we eat enough, don't prepare them properly or are
>> unlucky enough to be susceptible. Some beans are well known for
>> containing arsenic and even potatoes are poisonous if we eat an
>> unfeasibly large amount. Others may know more.

>
>I have some books on the topic, and if I spend any longer working on
>*that* document I'll be quite, quite mad...
>
> **NOTE: READ AT YOUR OWN RISK. I AM NOT ADVISING ANYONE TO TRY ANY OF
>THIS. ANY PLANT CAN BE HARMFUL WHEN INGESTED. Some EXTREMELY POISONOUS
>plants (such as Fool's Parsley) can be easily confused with the
>following interesting plants**

(snip)
I should have written "water parsnip", though wild plants are prone to
a variety of confusing names. I'd tend to treat umbellifera like fungi
- best avoided unless one is really sure. Even hemlock looks much like
the others.

We get no shortage of keck (cow parsley) growing in the lawn. It's a
nuisance but when I mow it, it produces a lovely/horrible (delete as
appropriate) coriander smell.
--
Phil C.
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graham
 
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Default Venison


"The Reid" > wrote in message
...
> Following up to graham
>
>>Saw a dvd last night featuring the Irish actress Flora Montgomery. Could
>>we
>>include her as a love interest?

>
> How much love interest is this film having?


I was just trying to balance the lust interest:-)

Graham


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June Hughes
 
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Default Venison

In message <[email protected]>, graham >
writes
>
>"The Reid" > wrote in message
.. .
>> Following up to graham
>>
>>>Saw a dvd last night featuring the Irish actress Flora Montgomery. Could
>>>we
>>>include her as a love interest?

>>
>> How much love interest is this film having?

>
>I was just trying to balance the lust interest:-)
>

Humph! Typical Man
--
June Hughes
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