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Old 09-02-2019, 09:59 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default I ordered a new rhubarb


After decades of service, my old rhubarb died. It used to produce
really broad stalks and lots of them
I replaced it a couple of years ago but all the new plant produced
were blossom stalks and a few skinny stalks.

I ordered a new rhubarb yesterday. It promises to produce few or no
blossom stalks. It looks like it will produce nice broad stalks.
https://www.growerssolution.com/rhub...e-rhubarb.html
Until I started looking around online for rhubarb I didn't realize
that some rhubarb has a nasty habit of producing a lot of blossom
stalks. The blossom stalks steal all the plant energy and the stalks
themselves are throw aways.

I'm looking forward to a new crop in 2020. We enjoy rhubarb sauce,
pie and kuchen.

Janet US

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Old 09-02-2019, 10:30 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default I ordered a new rhubarb

On 2019-02-09 4:59 p.m., U.S. Janet B. wrote:

After decades of service, my old rhubarb died. It used to produce
really broad stalks and lots of them
I replaced it a couple of years ago but all the new plant produced
were blossom stalks and a few skinny stalks.

I ordered a new rhubarb yesterday. It promises to produce few or no
blossom stalks. It looks like it will produce nice broad stalks.
https://www.growerssolution.com/rhub...e-rhubarb.html
Until I started looking around online for rhubarb I didn't realize
that some rhubarb has a nasty habit of producing a lot of blossom
stalks. The blossom stalks steal all the plant energy and the stalks
themselves are throw aways.


I didn't think that it was possible to kill rhubarb, but I lost some
thanks to a black walnut tree. I started over but it takes a couple
years before those things start producing. I am afraid that the new
location is starting to be affected by another nearby black walnut. The
nearby black current and blueberries aren't producing at all.


I'm looking forward to a new crop in 2020. We enjoy rhubarb sauce,
pie and kuchen.


Mine all goes to pies or coffee cakes. I found that all you need to do
to freeze rhubarb is to stick it in a back and put it in the freezer,
not sugar needed.


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Old 09-02-2019, 10:49 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default I ordered a new rhubarb

On Sat, 9 Feb 2019 17:30:43 -0500, Dave Smith
wrote:

On 2019-02-09 4:59 p.m., U.S. Janet B. wrote:

After decades of service, my old rhubarb died. It used to produce
really broad stalks and lots of them
I replaced it a couple of years ago but all the new plant produced
were blossom stalks and a few skinny stalks.

I ordered a new rhubarb yesterday. It promises to produce few or no
blossom stalks. It looks like it will produce nice broad stalks.
https://www.growerssolution.com/rhub...e-rhubarb.html
Until I started looking around online for rhubarb I didn't realize
that some rhubarb has a nasty habit of producing a lot of blossom
stalks. The blossom stalks steal all the plant energy and the stalks
themselves are throw aways.


I didn't think that it was possible to kill rhubarb, but I lost some
thanks to a black walnut tree. I started over but it takes a couple
years before those things start producing. I am afraid that the new
location is starting to be affected by another nearby black walnut. The
nearby black current and blueberries aren't producing at all.


I'm looking forward to a new crop in 2020. We enjoy rhubarb sauce,
pie and kuchen.


Mine all goes to pies or coffee cakes. I found that all you need to do
to freeze rhubarb is to stick it in a back and put it in the freezer,
not sugar needed.


I assume that you are keeping all the black walnut leaves picked up?
That's about all you can do. I don't know if encroaching roots are
able to 'poison' the soil. Good luck with that.
Janet US
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Old 09-02-2019, 11:10 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default I ordered a new rhubarb

On 2019-02-09 5:49 p.m., U.S. Janet B. wrote:
On Sat, 9 Feb 2019 17:30:43 -0500, Dave Smith



I assume that you are keeping all the black walnut leaves picked up?
That's about all you can do. I don't know if encroaching roots are
able to 'poison' the soil. Good luck with that.


From what I have read, the toxic jugalone is mainly in the roots, buds
and nut hull and there is not much in the leaves or stems. The
squirrels gather up most of the nuts and take them to various locations
to be processed because I see piles of rotten old hulls around those
spots. The leaves get mulched by the mower. It doesn't seem to bother
the grass. On the contrary, some of my thickest and weed free stretches
of lawn are around the black walnut trees. Chives have been growing
wild around one of them for the 40 plus years I have lived here.
One of my spring projects is to move the black currants and blue
berries away from the black walnut trees.



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Old 10-02-2019, 12:21 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default I ordered a new rhubarb

On Sat, 09 Feb 2019 14:59:18 -0700, U.S. Janet B.
wrote:


After decades of service, my old rhubarb died. It used to produce
really broad stalks and lots of them
I replaced it a couple of years ago but all the new plant produced
were blossom stalks and a few skinny stalks.

I ordered a new rhubarb yesterday. It promises to produce few or no
blossom stalks. It looks like it will produce nice broad stalks.
https://www.growerssolution.com/rhub...e-rhubarb.html
Until I started looking around online for rhubarb I didn't realize
that some rhubarb has a nasty habit of producing a lot of blossom
stalks. The blossom stalks steal all the plant energy and the stalks
themselves are throw aways.

I'm looking forward to a new crop in 2020. We enjoy rhubarb sauce,
pie and kuchen.

Janet US


I have never tasted rhubarb.


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Old 10-02-2019, 12:50 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default I ordered a new rhubarb


"U.S. Janet B." wrote in message
...

After decades of service, my old rhubarb died. It used to produce
really broad stalks and lots of them
I replaced it a couple of years ago but all the new plant produced
were blossom stalks and a few skinny stalks.

I ordered a new rhubarb yesterday. It promises to produce few or no
blossom stalks. It looks like it will produce nice broad stalks.
https://www.growerssolution.com/rhub...e-rhubarb.html
Until I started looking around online for rhubarb I didn't realize
that some rhubarb has a nasty habit of producing a lot of blossom
stalks. The blossom stalks steal all the plant energy and the stalks
themselves are throw aways.

I'm looking forward to a new crop in 2020. We enjoy rhubarb sauce,
pie and kuchen.

Janet US


When we first moved into the house we bought in WA (as a child), there
appeared to be two beautiful rhubarb plants behind the flowering quince. A
neighbor confirmed that they were in fact rhubarb but my parents wouldn't
let me eat either the quince or the rhubarb, thinking them to be poison.
Even though I promised to cook them both, they still told me to keep away.
My dad ripped out the rhubarb and eventually. the quince.

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Old 10-02-2019, 01:11 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default I ordered a new rhubarb

On 2/9/2019 5:49 PM, U.S. Janet B. wrote:

I assume that you are keeping all the black walnut leaves picked up?
That's about all you can do. I don't know if encroaching roots are
able to 'poison' the soil. Good luck with that.

Yes, the roots do damage to many plants - which is why I no longer have
rhubarb. Mostly the juglone damages the plants I want, but not the weeds
I'd like to get rid of...
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Old 10-02-2019, 01:37 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default I ordered a new rhubarb

On 2/9/2019 7:21 PM, Boron Elgar wrote:
On Sat, 09 Feb 2019 14:59:18 -0700, U.S. Janet B.
wrote:


After decades of service, my old rhubarb died. It used to produce
really broad stalks and lots of them
I replaced it a couple of years ago but all the new plant produced
were blossom stalks and a few skinny stalks.

I ordered a new rhubarb yesterday. It promises to produce few or no
blossom stalks. It looks like it will produce nice broad stalks.
https://www.growerssolution.com/rhub...e-rhubarb.html
Until I started looking around online for rhubarb I didn't realize
that some rhubarb has a nasty habit of producing a lot of blossom
stalks. The blossom stalks steal all the plant energy and the stalks
themselves are throw aways.

I'm looking forward to a new crop in 2020. We enjoy rhubarb sauce,
pie and kuchen.

Janet US


I have never tasted rhubarb.


I have. Once. I have no idea why anyone would grow it but it seems
popular in some regions.
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Old 10-02-2019, 01:46 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default I ordered a new rhubarb

On Sat, 9 Feb 2019 20:37:59 -0500, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

On 2/9/2019 7:21 PM, Boron Elgar wrote:
On Sat, 09 Feb 2019 14:59:18 -0700, U.S. Janet B.
wrote:


After decades of service, my old rhubarb died. It used to produce
really broad stalks and lots of them
I replaced it a couple of years ago but all the new plant produced
were blossom stalks and a few skinny stalks.

I ordered a new rhubarb yesterday. It promises to produce few or no
blossom stalks. It looks like it will produce nice broad stalks.
https://www.growerssolution.com/rhub...e-rhubarb.html
Until I started looking around online for rhubarb I didn't realize
that some rhubarb has a nasty habit of producing a lot of blossom
stalks. The blossom stalks steal all the plant energy and the stalks
themselves are throw aways.

I'm looking forward to a new crop in 2020. We enjoy rhubarb sauce,
pie and kuchen.

Janet US


I have never tasted rhubarb.


I have. Once. I have no idea why anyone would grow it but it seems
popular in some regions.


It's too sour to eat on its own, so you have to add a lot of sugar to
make it edible. Sounds pretty useless to me. I think it's popular in
merry old England.
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Old 10-02-2019, 01:50 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default I ordered a new rhubarb

Ed Pawlowski wrote:
On 2/9/2019 7:21 PM, Boron Elgar wrote:
On Sat, 09 Feb 2019 14:59:18 -0700, U.S. Janet B.
wrote:


After decades of service, my old rhubarb died. It used to produce
really broad stalks and lots of them
I replaced it a couple of years ago but all the new plant produced
were blossom stalks and a few skinny stalks.

I ordered a new rhubarb yesterday. It promises to produce few or no
blossom stalks. It looks like it will produce nice broad stalks.
https://www.growerssolution.com/rhub...e-rhubarb.html

Until I started looking around online for rhubarb I didn't realize
that some rhubarb has a nasty habit of producing a lot of blossom
stalks. The blossom stalks steal all the plant energy and the stalks
themselves are throw aways.

I'm looking forward to a new crop in 2020. We enjoy rhubarb sauce,
pie and kuchen.

Janet US


I have never tasted rhubarb.


I have. Once. I have no idea why anyone would grow it but it seems
popular in some regions.


It's nasty, bitter stuff. Seems popular in some areas as you say. Some
rural towns in the midwest especially.

I've ate (or tried to eat) some rhubarb pies there. All I could taste
was pure sugar. I think the stuff is so bitter and nasty tasting that a
hell of a lot of sugar is needed to try to make it palatable, but this
was a fail for me. I'd rather eat spoonfuls of pure cane sugar ... no
need for the nasty ass rhubarb.






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Old 10-02-2019, 01:52 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default I ordered a new rhubarb

Julie Bove wrote:

"U.S. Janet B." wrote in message
...

After decades of service, my old rhubarb died. It used to produce
really broad stalks and lots of them
I replaced it a couple of years ago but all the new plant produced
were blossom stalks and a few skinny stalks.

I ordered a new rhubarb yesterday. It promises to produce few or no
blossom stalks. It looks like it will produce nice broad stalks.
https://www.growerssolution.com/rhub...e-rhubarb.html

Until I started looking around online for rhubarb I didn't realize
that some rhubarb has a nasty habit of producing a lot of blossom
stalks. The blossom stalks steal all the plant energy and the stalks
themselves are throw aways.

I'm looking forward to a new crop in 2020. We enjoy rhubarb sauce,
pie and kuchen.

Janet US


When we first moved into the house we bought in WA (as a child), there
appeared to be two beautiful rhubarb plants behind the flowering quince.
A neighbor confirmed that they were in fact rhubarb but my parents
wouldn't let me eat either the quince or the rhubarb, thinking them to
be poison. Even though I promised to cook them both, they still told me
to keep away. My dad ripped out the rhubarb and eventually. the quince.


A smart man, and apparently a hell of a good gardener. Yoose should have
kept him instead of the bum yoose have now.




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Old 10-02-2019, 01:56 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default I ordered a new rhubarb

On Sat, 09 Feb 2019 19:21:22 -0500, Boron Elgar
wrote:

On Sat, 09 Feb 2019 14:59:18 -0700, U.S. Janet B.
wrote:


After decades of service, my old rhubarb died. It used to produce
really broad stalks and lots of them
I replaced it a couple of years ago but all the new plant produced
were blossom stalks and a few skinny stalks.

I ordered a new rhubarb yesterday. It promises to produce few or no
blossom stalks. It looks like it will produce nice broad stalks.
https://www.growerssolution.com/rhub...e-rhubarb.html
Until I started looking around online for rhubarb I didn't realize
that some rhubarb has a nasty habit of producing a lot of blossom
stalks. The blossom stalks steal all the plant energy and the stalks
themselves are throw aways.

I'm looking forward to a new crop in 2020. We enjoy rhubarb sauce,
pie and kuchen.

Janet US


I have never tasted rhubarb.


You gotta be kidding, with all the cooking and gardening you do...
next time you go to a real bakery buy a strawberry rhubarb pie...
orgasmic.
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Old 10-02-2019, 02:04 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default I ordered a new rhubarb

On Sat, 9 Feb 2019 16:50:09 -0800, "Julie Bove"
wrote:


"U.S. Janet B." wrote in message
.. .

After decades of service, my old rhubarb died. It used to produce
really broad stalks and lots of them
I replaced it a couple of years ago but all the new plant produced
were blossom stalks and a few skinny stalks.

I ordered a new rhubarb yesterday. It promises to produce few or no
blossom stalks. It looks like it will produce nice broad stalks.
https://www.growerssolution.com/rhub...e-rhubarb.html
Until I started looking around online for rhubarb I didn't realize
that some rhubarb has a nasty habit of producing a lot of blossom
stalks. The blossom stalks steal all the plant energy and the stalks
themselves are throw aways.

I'm looking forward to a new crop in 2020. We enjoy rhubarb sauce,
pie and kuchen.

Janet US


When we first moved into the house we bought in WA (as a child), there
appeared to be two beautiful rhubarb plants behind the flowering quince. A
neighbor confirmed that they were in fact rhubarb but my parents wouldn't
let me eat either the quince or the rhubarb, thinking them to be poison.
Even though I promised to cook them both, they still told me to keep away.
My dad ripped out the rhubarb and eventually. the quince.


Rhubarb leaves are indeed toxic. There are many plants that produce
ordinary produce that her highly toxic... tomato plants are quite
toxic... tomatoes are in the nightshade family, the leaves, stems. and
roots are very toxic, same for potatoes.
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Old 10-02-2019, 02:53 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default I ordered a new rhubarb

On Saturday, February 9, 2019 at 6:46:18 PM UTC-7, Bruce wrote:
On Sat, 9 Feb 2019 20:37:59 -0500, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

On 2/9/2019 7:21 PM, Boron Elgar wrote:
On Sat, 09 Feb 2019 14:59:18 -0700, U.S. Janet B.
wrote:


After decades of service, my old rhubarb died. It used to produce
really broad stalks and lots of them
I replaced it a couple of years ago but all the new plant produced
were blossom stalks and a few skinny stalks.

I ordered a new rhubarb yesterday. It promises to produce few or no
blossom stalks. It looks like it will produce nice broad stalks.
https://www.growerssolution.com/rhub...e-rhubarb.html
Until I started looking around online for rhubarb I didn't realize
that some rhubarb has a nasty habit of producing a lot of blossom
stalks. The blossom stalks steal all the plant energy and the stalks
themselves are throw aways.

I'm looking forward to a new crop in 2020. We enjoy rhubarb sauce,
pie and kuchen.

Janet US

I have never tasted rhubarb.


I have. Once. I have no idea why anyone would grow it but it seems
popular in some regions.


It's too sour to eat on its own, so you have to add a lot of sugar to
make it edible. Sounds pretty useless to me. I think it's popular in
merry old England.


Rhubarb is a wonderful plant. Those who grew up with it appreciate it and make
all kinds of wonderful pies, tarts, puddings, etc., from it.
A bit of reading and trial and error will convince even the most doubtful
Thomas of its worth.
======
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Old 10-02-2019, 02:56 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default I ordered a new rhubarb

On Saturday, February 9, 2019 at 7:04:07 PM UTC-7, Sheldon wrote:
On Sat, 9 Feb 2019 16:50:09 -0800, "Julie Bove"
wrote:


"U.S. Janet B." wrote in message
.. .

After decades of service, my old rhubarb died. It used to produce
really broad stalks and lots of them
I replaced it a couple of years ago but all the new plant produced
were blossom stalks and a few skinny stalks.

I ordered a new rhubarb yesterday. It promises to produce few or no
blossom stalks. It looks like it will produce nice broad stalks.
https://www.growerssolution.com/rhub...e-rhubarb.html
Until I started looking around online for rhubarb I didn't realize
that some rhubarb has a nasty habit of producing a lot of blossom
stalks. The blossom stalks steal all the plant energy and the stalks
themselves are throw aways.

I'm looking forward to a new crop in 2020. We enjoy rhubarb sauce,
pie and kuchen.

Janet US


When we first moved into the house we bought in WA (as a child), there
appeared to be two beautiful rhubarb plants behind the flowering quince. A
neighbor confirmed that they were in fact rhubarb but my parents wouldn't
let me eat either the quince or the rhubarb, thinking them to be poison.
Even though I promised to cook them both, they still told me to keep away.
My dad ripped out the rhubarb and eventually. the quince.


Rhubarb leaves are indeed toxic. There are many plants that produce
ordinary produce that her highly toxic... tomato plants are quite
toxic... tomatoes are in the nightshade family, the leaves, stems. and
roots are very toxic, same for potatoes.


Some of the most toxic posters are on this site as well.
======


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