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Old 10-02-2019, 03:12 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default I ordered a new rhubarb

Janet, I find it unusual your rhubarb died...it has been my experience that you can do anything
to the plants and they never die. ;-))

Mine used to produce blossom stalks, but I just cut those off or pulled them out, and would
have rhubarb most of the spring and summer. Although the early stuff was the best.

Have you ever had rhubarb sauce on chocolate cake? I had a neighbor who asked for that
dessert every year on his birthday. It's pretty tasty.

N.

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Old 10-02-2019, 03:17 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default I ordered a new rhubarb

On Sat, 9 Feb 2019 18:53:26 -0800 (PST), Roy
wrote:

On Saturday, February 9, 2019 at 6:46:18 PM UTC-7, Bruce wrote:
On Sat, 9 Feb 2019 20:37:59 -0500, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

On 2/9/2019 7:21 PM, Boron Elgar wrote:

I have never tasted rhubarb.


I have. Once. I have no idea why anyone would grow it but it seems
popular in some regions.


It's too sour to eat on its own, so you have to add a lot of sugar to
make it edible. Sounds pretty useless to me. I think it's popular in
merry old England.


Rhubarb is a wonderful plant. Those who grew up with it appreciate it and make
all kinds of wonderful pies, tarts, puddings, etc., from it.
A bit of reading and trial and error will convince even the most doubtful
Thomas of its worth.
======


I think rhubarb's an Anglo hobby. To each culture their own. Enjoy!
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Old 10-02-2019, 03:17 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default I ordered a new rhubarb

I am not fond of any adulteration of rhubarb pie....but love just plain rhubarb with
a flaky, tasty bottom crust and a lattice pastry top crust.

Our Blue-Ribbon Barb posted a rhubarb cake (kind of a simple "dump"' cake years
ago, and it is spectacularly easy and very good. Do a Google group search and I
bet you can find it. (I don't have it handy, or I would post it.)

N.
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Old 10-02-2019, 03:19 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default I ordered a new rhubarb

On Sat, 9 Feb 2019 18:56:17 -0800 (PST), Roy
wrote:

On Saturday, February 9, 2019 at 7:04:07 PM UTC-7, Sheldon wrote:
On Sat, 9 Feb 2019 16:50:09 -0800, "Julie Bove"
wrote:

When we first moved into the house we bought in WA (as a child), there
appeared to be two beautiful rhubarb plants behind the flowering quince. A
neighbor confirmed that they were in fact rhubarb but my parents wouldn't
let me eat either the quince or the rhubarb, thinking them to be poison.
Even though I promised to cook them both, they still told me to keep away.
My dad ripped out the rhubarb and eventually. the quince.


Rhubarb leaves are indeed toxic. There are many plants that produce
ordinary produce that her highly toxic... tomato plants are quite
toxic... tomatoes are in the nightshade family, the leaves, stems. and
roots are very toxic, same for potatoes.


Some of the most toxic posters are on this site as well.
======


Toxic posters? I thought it was a bunch of jolly hobbits here.
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Old 10-02-2019, 04:16 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default I ordered a new rhubarb

On 2019-02-09 10:17 p.m., Nancy2 wrote:
I am not fond of any adulteration of rhubarb pie....but love just plain rhubarb with
a flaky, tasty bottom crust and a lattice pastry top crust.


Bravo. It is a waste of strawberries and a waste of good rhubarb.



Our Blue-Ribbon Barb posted a rhubarb cake (kind of a simple "dump"' cake years
ago, and it is spectacularly easy and very good. Do a Google group search and I
bet you can find it. (I don't have it handy, or I would post it.)

N.




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Old 10-02-2019, 07:13 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default I ordered a new rhubarb



"U.S. Janet B." wrote in message
...


After decades of service, my old rhubarb died. It used to produce
really broad stalks and lots of them
I replaced it a couple of years ago but all the new plant produced
were blossom stalks and a few skinny stalks.

I ordered a new rhubarb yesterday. It promises to produce few or no
blossom stalks. It looks like it will produce nice broad stalks.
https://www.growerssolution.com/rhub...e-rhubarb.html
Until I started looking around online for rhubarb I didn't realize
that some rhubarb has a nasty habit of producing a lot of blossom
stalks. The blossom stalks steal all the plant energy and the stalks
themselves are throw aways.

I'm looking forward to a new crop in 2020. We enjoy rhubarb sauce,
pie and kuchen.

Janet US

==

Good luck! Ours died a few years ago but I never replaced it.


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Old 10-02-2019, 07:16 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default I ordered a new rhubarb



"Bruce" wrote in message ...

On Sat, 9 Feb 2019 20:37:59 -0500, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

On 2/9/2019 7:21 PM, Boron Elgar wrote:
On Sat, 09 Feb 2019 14:59:18 -0700, U.S. Janet B.
wrote:


After decades of service, my old rhubarb died. It used to produce
really broad stalks and lots of them
I replaced it a couple of years ago but all the new plant produced
were blossom stalks and a few skinny stalks.

I ordered a new rhubarb yesterday. It promises to produce few or no
blossom stalks. It looks like it will produce nice broad stalks.
https://www.growerssolution.com/rhub...e-rhubarb.html
Until I started looking around online for rhubarb I didn't realize
that some rhubarb has a nasty habit of producing a lot of blossom
stalks. The blossom stalks steal all the plant energy and the stalks
themselves are throw aways.

I'm looking forward to a new crop in 2020. We enjoy rhubarb sauce,
pie and kuchen.

Janet US


I have never tasted rhubarb.


I have. Once. I have no idea why anyone would grow it but it seems
popular in some regions.


It's too sour to eat on its own, so you have to add a lot of sugar to
make it edible. Sounds pretty useless to me. I think it's popular in
merry old England.

==

When we were children, we used to get a stick of rhubarb and a bag of sugar
to dip into

No, I haven't done that since


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Old 10-02-2019, 07:16 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default I ordered a new rhubarb



"Roy" wrote in message
...

On Saturday, February 9, 2019 at 6:46:18 PM UTC-7, Bruce wrote:
On Sat, 9 Feb 2019 20:37:59 -0500, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

On 2/9/2019 7:21 PM, Boron Elgar wrote:
On Sat, 09 Feb 2019 14:59:18 -0700, U.S. Janet B.
wrote:


After decades of service, my old rhubarb died. It used to produce
really broad stalks and lots of them
I replaced it a couple of years ago but all the new plant produced
were blossom stalks and a few skinny stalks.

I ordered a new rhubarb yesterday. It promises to produce few or no
blossom stalks. It looks like it will produce nice broad stalks.
https://www.growerssolution.com/rhub...e-rhubarb.html
Until I started looking around online for rhubarb I didn't realize
that some rhubarb has a nasty habit of producing a lot of blossom
stalks. The blossom stalks steal all the plant energy and the stalks
themselves are throw aways.

I'm looking forward to a new crop in 2020. We enjoy rhubarb sauce,
pie and kuchen.

Janet US

I have never tasted rhubarb.


I have. Once. I have no idea why anyone would grow it but it seems
popular in some regions.


It's too sour to eat on its own, so you have to add a lot of sugar to
make it edible. Sounds pretty useless to me. I think it's popular in
merry old England.


Rhubarb is a wonderful plant. Those who grew up with it appreciate it and
make
all kinds of wonderful pies, tarts, puddings, etc., from it.
A bit of reading and trial and error will convince even the most doubtful
Thomas of its worth.
======

Yes, it's lovely in pies etc


  #24 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 10-02-2019, 07:17 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Join Date: May 2018
Posts: 3,775
Default I ordered a new rhubarb



"Bruce" wrote in message ...

On Sat, 9 Feb 2019 18:53:26 -0800 (PST), Roy
wrote:

On Saturday, February 9, 2019 at 6:46:18 PM UTC-7, Bruce wrote:
On Sat, 9 Feb 2019 20:37:59 -0500, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

On 2/9/2019 7:21 PM, Boron Elgar wrote:

I have never tasted rhubarb.


I have. Once. I have no idea why anyone would grow it but it seems
popular in some regions.


It's too sour to eat on its own, so you have to add a lot of sugar to
make it edible. Sounds pretty useless to me. I think it's popular in
merry old England.


Rhubarb is a wonderful plant. Those who grew up with it appreciate it and
make
all kinds of wonderful pies, tarts, puddings, etc., from it.
A bit of reading and trial and error will convince even the most doubtful
Thomas of its worth.
======


I think rhubarb's an Anglo hobby. To each culture their own. Enjoy!

--

Well given that the USians are talking about it, don't you think you might
be wrong?? Hmmm???



  #25 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 10-02-2019, 08:03 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 12,249
Default I ordered a new rhubarb

On Sun, 10 Feb 2019 07:17:44 -0000, "Ophelia"
wrote:



"Bruce" wrote in message ...

On Sat, 9 Feb 2019 18:53:26 -0800 (PST), Roy
wrote:

On Saturday, February 9, 2019 at 6:46:18 PM UTC-7, Bruce wrote:

It's too sour to eat on its own, so you have to add a lot of sugar to
make it edible. Sounds pretty useless to me. I think it's popular in
merry old England.


Rhubarb is a wonderful plant. Those who grew up with it appreciate it and
make
all kinds of wonderful pies, tarts, puddings, etc., from it.
A bit of reading and trial and error will convince even the most doubtful
Thomas of its worth.
======


I think rhubarb's an Anglo hobby. To each culture their own. Enjoy!

--

Well given that the USians are talking about it, don't you think you might
be wrong?? Hmmm???


But they're your colony!


  #26 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 10-02-2019, 08:04 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Join Date: May 2016
Posts: 12,249
Default I ordered a new rhubarb

On Sun, 10 Feb 2019 07:16:46 -0000, "Ophelia"
wrote:



"Roy" wrote in message
...

On Saturday, February 9, 2019 at 6:46:18 PM UTC-7, Bruce wrote:
On Sat, 9 Feb 2019 20:37:59 -0500, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

On 2/9/2019 7:21 PM, Boron Elgar wrote:
On Sat, 09 Feb 2019 14:59:18 -0700, U.S. Janet B.
wrote:


After decades of service, my old rhubarb died. It used to produce
really broad stalks and lots of them
I replaced it a couple of years ago but all the new plant produced
were blossom stalks and a few skinny stalks.

I ordered a new rhubarb yesterday. It promises to produce few or no
blossom stalks. It looks like it will produce nice broad stalks.
https://www.growerssolution.com/rhub...e-rhubarb.html
Until I started looking around online for rhubarb I didn't realize
that some rhubarb has a nasty habit of producing a lot of blossom
stalks. The blossom stalks steal all the plant energy and the stalks
themselves are throw aways.

I'm looking forward to a new crop in 2020. We enjoy rhubarb sauce,
pie and kuchen.

Janet US

I have never tasted rhubarb.


I have. Once. I have no idea why anyone would grow it but it seems
popular in some regions.


It's too sour to eat on its own, so you have to add a lot of sugar to
make it edible. Sounds pretty useless to me. I think it's popular in
merry old England.


Rhubarb is a wonderful plant. Those who grew up with it appreciate it and
make
all kinds of wonderful pies, tarts, puddings, etc., from it.
A bit of reading and trial and error will convince even the most doubtful
Thomas of its worth.
======

Yes, it's lovely in pies etc


See?
  #27 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 10-02-2019, 08:04 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 12,249
Default I ordered a new rhubarb

On Sun, 10 Feb 2019 07:16:17 -0000, "Ophelia"
wrote:



"Bruce" wrote in message ...

On Sat, 9 Feb 2019 20:37:59 -0500, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

On 2/9/2019 7:21 PM, Boron Elgar wrote:
On Sat, 09 Feb 2019 14:59:18 -0700, U.S. Janet B.
wrote:


After decades of service, my old rhubarb died. It used to produce
really broad stalks and lots of them
I replaced it a couple of years ago but all the new plant produced
were blossom stalks and a few skinny stalks.

I ordered a new rhubarb yesterday. It promises to produce few or no
blossom stalks. It looks like it will produce nice broad stalks.
https://www.growerssolution.com/rhub...e-rhubarb.html
Until I started looking around online for rhubarb I didn't realize
that some rhubarb has a nasty habit of producing a lot of blossom
stalks. The blossom stalks steal all the plant energy and the stalks
themselves are throw aways.

I'm looking forward to a new crop in 2020. We enjoy rhubarb sauce,
pie and kuchen.

Janet US

I have never tasted rhubarb.


I have. Once. I have no idea why anyone would grow it but it seems
popular in some regions.


It's too sour to eat on its own, so you have to add a lot of sugar to
make it edible. Sounds pretty useless to me. I think it's popular in
merry old England.

==

When we were children, we used to get a stick of rhubarb and a bag of sugar
to dip into

No, I haven't done that since



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Old 10-02-2019, 08:23 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 44,590
Default I ordered a new rhubarb


"Hank Rogers" wrote in message
...
Julie Bove wrote:

"U.S. Janet B." wrote in message
...

After decades of service, my old rhubarb died. It used to produce
really broad stalks and lots of them
I replaced it a couple of years ago but all the new plant produced
were blossom stalks and a few skinny stalks.

I ordered a new rhubarb yesterday. It promises to produce few or no
blossom stalks. It looks like it will produce nice broad stalks.
https://www.growerssolution.com/rhub...e-rhubarb.html

Until I started looking around online for rhubarb I didn't realize
that some rhubarb has a nasty habit of producing a lot of blossom
stalks. The blossom stalks steal all the plant energy and the stalks
themselves are throw aways.

I'm looking forward to a new crop in 2020. We enjoy rhubarb sauce,
pie and kuchen.

Janet US


When we first moved into the house we bought in WA (as a child), there
appeared to be two beautiful rhubarb plants behind the flowering quince.
A neighbor confirmed that they were in fact rhubarb but my parents
wouldn't let me eat either the quince or the rhubarb, thinking them to
be poison. Even though I promised to cook them both, they still told me
to keep away. My dad ripped out the rhubarb and eventually. the quince.


A smart man, and apparently a hell of a good gardener. Yoose should have
kept him instead of the bum yoose have now.


He's gardening up in heaven now.

  #29 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 10-02-2019, 08:24 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 44,590
Default I ordered a new rhubarb


"Roy" wrote in message
...
On Saturday, February 9, 2019 at 7:04:07 PM UTC-7, Sheldon wrote:
On Sat, 9 Feb 2019 16:50:09 -0800, "Julie Bove"
wrote:


"U.S. Janet B." wrote in message
.. .

After decades of service, my old rhubarb died. It used to produce
really broad stalks and lots of them
I replaced it a couple of years ago but all the new plant produced
were blossom stalks and a few skinny stalks.

I ordered a new rhubarb yesterday. It promises to produce few or no
blossom stalks. It looks like it will produce nice broad stalks.
https://www.growerssolution.com/rhub...e-rhubarb.html
Until I started looking around online for rhubarb I didn't realize
that some rhubarb has a nasty habit of producing a lot of blossom
stalks. The blossom stalks steal all the plant energy and the stalks
themselves are throw aways.

I'm looking forward to a new crop in 2020. We enjoy rhubarb sauce,
pie and kuchen.

Janet US

When we first moved into the house we bought in WA (as a child), there
appeared to be two beautiful rhubarb plants behind the flowering quince.
A
neighbor confirmed that they were in fact rhubarb but my parents
wouldn't
let me eat either the quince or the rhubarb, thinking them to be poison.
Even though I promised to cook them both, they still told me to keep
away.
My dad ripped out the rhubarb and eventually. the quince.


Rhubarb leaves are indeed toxic. There are many plants that produce
ordinary produce that her highly toxic... tomato plants are quite
toxic... tomatoes are in the nightshade family, the leaves, stems. and
roots are very toxic, same for potatoes.


Some of the most toxic posters are on this site as well.
======


Bwahaha!

  #30 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 10-02-2019, 09:42 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 18,571
Default I ordered a new rhubarb

Nancy2 wrote:

I am not fond of any adulteration of rhubarb pie....but love just plain rhubarb with
a flaky, tasty bottom crust and a lattice pastry top crust.

Our Blue-Ribbon Barb posted a rhubarb cake (kind of a simple "dump"' cake years
ago, and it is spectacularly easy and very good. Do a Google group search and I
bet you can find it. (I don't have it handy, or I would post it.)


She has it on the RFC site.

Signature dish page is -
http://www.recfoodcooking.org/signature.php

Direct link to that recipe -
http://www.recfoodcooking.org/sigs/B...rd%20Cake.html


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