General Cooking (rec.food.cooking) For general food and cooking discussion. Foods of all kinds, food procurement, cooking methods and techniques, eating, etc.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 23-06-2014, 03:56 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 685
Default American foodstuffs

Grabbed this quote from Gawker, where a commenter was talking about
American food:

"She says that compared to food in Ireland (where she lives) US bread
is sweet, nothing is perishable, fresh fruit and vegetables are really
expensive, and the meat is full of water and has a weird texture."

All true.

I never understood the widespread practice of adding sugar to bread
dough, and what corporate food production has done to meat is a crime.

  #2 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 23-06-2014, 04:47 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Posts: 11,356
Default American foodstuffs



"Sqwertz" wrote in message
...
On Mon, 23 Jun 2014 09:56:18 -0500, Moe DeLoughan wrote:

Grabbed this quote from Gawker, where a commenter was talking about
American food:

"She says that compared to food in Ireland (where she lives) US bread
is sweet, nothing is perishable, fresh fruit and vegetables are really
expensive, and the meat is full of water and has a weird texture."

All true.


It's NOT true. She just doesn't know where to shop. You don't have
to shop at upscale grocers to get untreated meat or get bread without
sugar (I don't even know where to get regular bread WITH sugar). And
I don't know what she means by "nothing is perishable".

She must be shopping at Walmart. What do you expect from a nation who
eats haggis 3 times and are always liquored up on whiskey (since we're
carelessly stereotyping).


Haggis is Scottish not Irish.
--
http://www.helpforheroes.org.uk/shop/

  #3 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 23-06-2014, 04:47 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 1,661
Default American foodstuffs

On Monday, June 23, 2014 7:56:18 AM UTC-7, Moe DeLoughan wrote:

Grabbed this quote from Gawker, where a commenter was talking about
American food:


"She says that compared to food in Ireland (where she lives) US bread
is sweet, nothing is perishable, fresh fruit and vegetables are really
expensive, and the meat is full of water and has a weird texture."


Of course, to Irishmen, US meat seems weird. Flying Aer Lingus, I had
a beefsteak, presumably grass fed, which the most amazingly chewy bit
of beef I had ever eaten. Then there was the chicken dish that tasted
so strongly of fish that I was never quite sure what I had eaten. Turns
out that instead of feeding chickens on corn, in the British Isles they
prefer fishmeal.

And fresh fruit and vegetables in Ireland come from Spain and Israel.

But I would advise her to stop buying her groceries at Walmart.
  #5 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 23-06-2014, 05:35 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 6,414
Default American foodstuffs

On Mon, 23 Jun 2014 09:56:18 -0500, Moe DeLoughan
wrote:

Grabbed this quote from Gawker, where a commenter was talking about
American food:

"She says that compared to food in Ireland (where she lives) US bread
is sweet, nothing is perishable, fresh fruit and vegetables are really
expensive, and the meat is full of water and has a weird texture."

All true.

I never understood the widespread practice of adding sugar to bread
dough, and what corporate food production has done to meat is a crime.


generalizations about the US sell almost as well as stories about sex.
I would like to know where she shopped, at what time of year and what
she looked at.
Janet US


  #6 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 23-06-2014, 05:46 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 3,121
Default American foodstuffs


"Janet Bostwick" wrote in message
...
On Mon, 23 Jun 2014 09:56:18 -0500, Moe DeLoughan
wrote:

Grabbed this quote from Gawker, where a commenter was talking about
American food:

"She says that compared to food in Ireland (where she lives) US bread
is sweet, nothing is perishable, fresh fruit and vegetables are really
expensive, and the meat is full of water and has a weird texture."

All true.

I never understood the widespread practice of adding sugar to bread
dough, and what corporate food production has done to meat is a crime.


generalizations about the US sell almost as well as stories about sex.
I would like to know where she shopped, at what time of year and what
she looked at.


I'd like to know how she prefers her sex.


  #7 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 23-06-2014, 06:13 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 61,789
Default American foodstuffs

On Mon, 23 Jun 2014 16:47:04 +0100, "Ophelia"
wrote:

Haggis is Scottish not Irish.


Speaking of Scottish food. I've never thought twice about Scotch Eggs
because I thought the egg at the core was hard boiled, but I saw a
version on a cooking show this last weekend where he left the yolk
runny. Do you know anything about them?

--
All you need is love. But a little chocolate now and then doesn't hurt.
  #8 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 23-06-2014, 06:39 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Posts: 14,609
Default American foodstuffs


"Janet Bostwick" wrote in message
...

generalizations about the US sell almost as well as stories about sex.
I would like to know where she shopped, at what time of year and what
she looked at.
Janet US


Yes, and the generalizations are NEVER positive.

Cheri

  #9 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 23-06-2014, 06:43 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Posts: 14,609
Default American foodstuffs


"sf" wrote in message
...
On Mon, 23 Jun 2014 16:47:04 +0100, "Ophelia"
wrote:

Haggis is Scottish not Irish.


Speaking of Scottish food. I've never thought twice about Scotch Eggs
because I thought the egg at the core was hard boiled, but I saw a
version on a cooking show this last weekend where he left the yolk
runny. Do you know anything about them?


There's a recipe in the old Good Housekeeping cookbook. I tried them once,
but the eggs were hardboiled as you say. I was curious as to the runny yolk
so I found this on the net:


"Timing and precision are key. First off, you need to boil your eggs for
exactly 5 minutes, assuming they're large. They should be at room
temperature before you start, and you should let them cool afterwards. This
should result in a cooked white and a very runny yolk before you fry.

The oil you use to fry the Scotch eggs needs to be just the right
temperature - too hot and the crust will brown before the sausage is cooked,
too cool and the yolk will cook solid before the crust is browned. The oil
needs to be 350F/180C; a cube of bread should take 1 minute to completely
brown.

If the temperature is right the Scotch egg should take about 5 minutes to
brown evenly, and you should have properly-cooked sausage and a yolk that's
still runny"

  #10 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 23-06-2014, 06:44 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 3,121
Default American foodstuffs


"Cheri" wrote in message
...

"Janet Bostwick" wrote in message
...

generalizations about the US sell almost as well as stories about sex.
I would like to know where she shopped, at what time of year and what
she looked at.
Janet US


Yes, and the generalizations are NEVER positive.

Cheri

rubbish. We all know that Italians are wonderful people.




  #11 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 23-06-2014, 07:05 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Posts: 11,356
Default American foodstuffs



"Cheri" wrote in message
...

"sf" wrote in message
...
On Mon, 23 Jun 2014 16:47:04 +0100, "Ophelia"
wrote:

Haggis is Scottish not Irish.


Speaking of Scottish food. I've never thought twice about Scotch Eggs
because I thought the egg at the core was hard boiled, but I saw a
version on a cooking show this last weekend where he left the yolk
runny. Do you know anything about them?


No and I wouldn't fancy them if I did They are not a favourite of mine
however they are cooked)


There's a recipe in the old Good Housekeeping cookbook. I tried them once,
but the eggs were hardboiled as you say. I was curious as to the runny
yolk so I found this on the net:


"Timing and precision are key. First off, you need to boil your eggs for
exactly 5 minutes, assuming they're large. They should be at room
temperature before you start, and you should let them cool afterwards.
This should result in a cooked white and a very runny yolk before you fry.

The oil you use to fry the Scotch eggs needs to be just the right
temperature - too hot and the crust will brown before the sausage is
cooked, too cool and the yolk will cook solid before the crust is browned.
The oil needs to be 350F/180C; a cube of bread should take 1 minute to
completely brown.

If the temperature is right the Scotch egg should take about 5 minutes to
brown evenly, and you should have properly-cooked sausage and a yolk
that's still runny"


Do you like the idea? Will you try it?

--
http://www.helpforheroes.org.uk/shop/

  #12 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 23-06-2014, 07:14 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 61,789
Default American foodstuffs

On Mon, 23 Jun 2014 10:43:56 -0700, "Cheri"
wrote:


"sf" wrote in message
...
On Mon, 23 Jun 2014 16:47:04 +0100, "Ophelia"
wrote:

Haggis is Scottish not Irish.


Speaking of Scottish food. I've never thought twice about Scotch Eggs
because I thought the egg at the core was hard boiled, but I saw a
version on a cooking show this last weekend where he left the yolk
runny. Do you know anything about them?


There's a recipe in the old Good Housekeeping cookbook. I tried them once,
but the eggs were hardboiled as you say. I was curious as to the runny yolk
so I found this on the net:


"Timing and precision are key. First off, you need to boil your eggs for
exactly 5 minutes, assuming they're large. They should be at room
temperature before you start, and you should let them cool afterwards. This
should result in a cooked white and a very runny yolk before you fry.

The oil you use to fry the Scotch eggs needs to be just the right
temperature - too hot and the crust will brown before the sausage is cooked,
too cool and the yolk will cook solid before the crust is browned. The oil
needs to be 350F/180C; a cube of bread should take 1 minute to completely
brown.

If the temperature is right the Scotch egg should take about 5 minutes to
brown evenly, and you should have properly-cooked sausage and a yolk that's
still runny"


Thanks! That explains what I saw. the plated dish looked pretty good
to me. The other type just strikes me as being over cooked. I was
thinking it would be fun to serve at brunch in a shredded potato
basket... and it would be better as a restaurant dish because I don't
deep fry.

--
All you need is love. But a little chocolate now and then doesn't hurt.
  #13 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 23-06-2014, 07:43 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Posts: 2,459
Default American foodstuffs

On 6/23/2014 10:32 AM, Sqwertz wrote:
On Mon, 23 Jun 2014 09:56:18 -0500, Moe DeLoughan wrote:

Grabbed this quote from Gawker, where a commenter was talking about
American food:

"She says that compared to food in Ireland (where she lives) US bread
is sweet, nothing is perishable, fresh fruit and vegetables are really
expensive, and the meat is full of water and has a weird texture."

All true.


It's NOT true. She just doesn't know where to shop. You don't have
to shop at upscale grocers to get untreated meat or get bread without
sugar (I don't even know where to get regular bread WITH sugar). And
I don't know what she means by "nothing is perishable".

She must be shopping at Walmart. What do you expect from a nation who
eats haggis 3 times and are always liquored up on whiskey (since we're
carelessly stereotyping).

-sw

The Scotts eat haggis. I don't believe the Irish do.

--
Janet Wilder
Way-the-heck-south Texas
Spelling doesn't count. Cooking does.

---
This email is free from viruses and malware because avast! Antivirus protection is active.
http://www.avast.com

  #14 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 23-06-2014, 07:57 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Posts: 814
Default American foodstuffs


Sqwertz wrote:

On Mon, 23 Jun 2014 09:56:18 -0500, Moe DeLoughan wrote:

Grabbed this quote from Gawker, where a commenter was talking about
American food:

"She says that compared to food in Ireland (where she lives) US bread
is sweet, nothing is perishable, fresh fruit and vegetables are really
expensive, and the meat is full of water and has a weird texture."

All true.


It's NOT true. She just doesn't know where to shop. You don't have
to shop at upscale grocers to get untreated meat or get bread without
sugar (I don't even know where to get regular bread WITH sugar). And
I don't know what she means by "nothing is perishable".

She must be shopping at Walmart. What do you expect from a nation who
eats haggis 3 times and are always liquored up on whiskey (since we're
carelessly stereotyping).

-sw


Bingo!

It's very easy to find non "enhanced" meats, reasonably priced fresh
vegetables and high quality breads. Certainly we have access to a lot of
non-perishable foodstuffs, but all the normal fresh stuff is quite
perishable.

Mostly folks in Europe and elsewhere have a difficult time grasping just
how large and diverse the US is. If they think about applying a
generalization to the whole of Europe they might start to understand how
silly it is to generalize about the US. Each US state is more comparable
to an entire European country and there are 50 US states and a handfull
of territories that are all notably different from each other.
  #15 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 23-06-2014, 08:36 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 12,851
Default American foodstuffs

On 6/23/2014 10:56 AM, Moe DeLoughan wrote:
Grabbed this quote from Gawker, where a commenter was talking about
American food:

"She says that compared to food in Ireland (where she lives) US bread is
sweet, nothing is perishable, fresh fruit and vegetables are really
expensive, and the meat is full of water and has a weird texture."

All true.

I never understood the widespread practice of adding sugar to bread
dough, and what corporate food production has done to meat is a crime.


Sad that she never got to eat real food while visiting. There is crap
available but so is real food.

The bread I buy has no sugar and no preservatives. Some meat is
injected, but good meat is readily available.

Fresh fruit and veggies are not expensive in season. It is expensive
when we want peaches in January that has been flown in from South
America. Most of that stuff has poor taste adn texture too.


Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
American beer and spirits: As puritanical rules retreat, the American market for beer and spirits is growing more competitive Bob O'Dyne General Cooking 13 11-09-2012 07:41 PM
Developing an American Grand Cru from American Grapes John[_33_] Wine 3 06-05-2012 04:27 PM
Was That 300 Millionth American Really American? fred General Cooking 3 23-10-2006 01:23 PM
The shelf life of bottled foodstuffs Zinc Potterman Preserving 0 13-07-2006 11:40 AM
Exceedingly rare and exotic foodstuffs David Hare-Scott General Cooking 39 04-08-2005 07:40 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 08:41 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2022, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2022 FoodBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about Food and drink"

 

Copyright © 2017