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Default Greek Food

Long ago I had some GREAT Greek food in a little place in Fall's Church
Virginia. It was like beef stew but made with lamb.

There were lots of other dishes that others were having that looked good
too.

Prior to this, I had only had stuff like gyros and vinegary weird stuff
wrapped in grape leaves.

Anybody got some good recipes for really good Greek food?



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cybercat wrote:
> Long ago I had some GREAT Greek food in a little place in Fall's Church
> Virginia. It was like beef stew but made with lamb.
>
> There were lots of other dishes that others were having that looked good
> too.
>
> Prior to this, I had only had stuff like gyros and vinegary weird stuff
> wrapped in grape leaves.
>
> Anybody got some good recipes for really good Greek food?
>
>
>


Greek lamb stew is a classic and easy to make. Pop "Greek lamb stew"
into Google and the first hit is a good recipe and they include a half
dozen variations.

http://www.sheepscreek.com/recipes/greek_stew.html
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"cybercat" > wrote in message
.. .
> Long ago I had some GREAT Greek food in a little place in Fall's Church
> Virginia. It was like beef stew but made with lamb.
>
> There were lots of other dishes that others were having that looked good too.
>
> Prior to this, I had only had stuff like gyros and vinegary weird stuff
> wrapped in grape leaves.
>
> Anybody got some good recipes for really good Greek food?
>
>
> --
> Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com



You'll find a lot of "Greek" recipes on the net. I think there are 3 important
"hints" to Greek food'

First, always use fresh lemons, never use bottled.
Second, if the recipe calls for oregano they mean Greek Oregano (see below)
Third, always use Fresh Garlic.

Remember, quartered lemons are as much a table condiment as are salt and pepper.

Dimitri (yep its a Greek spelling)


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Greek oregano
Formerly listed botanically as Origanum heracleoticum, Greek Oregano is one very
spicy herb. It's parent Origanum vulgaris, a culinary zero, is often
commercially grown and offered as Greek Oregano. O. vulgaris, often known as
Wild Marjoram, is an extremely invasive plant with a pink flower. Origanum
vulgaris hirtum is the true Greek Oregano with flavor so intense it numbs the
end of your tongue when fresh, and like all culinary oreganos, the flower of
Greek Oregano is white.

Mexican Oregano
Mexican Oregano-A Tasty Twist on an Age-Old Flavor
Plants & Gardens News Volume 20, Number 1 | Spring 2005
by Scott D. Appell
After a lifetime of growing edible plants, I've come to the conclusion that
"oregano" should be a botanical category of aroma and taste rather than the
common name for any one herb. After all, there are so many plants with the
requisite essential oils that provide oregano's heady, easily recognizable
fragrance and piquant flavor. Most folks in the U.S. are familiar with common
oregano (Origanum vulgare), and many have used Greek oregano, Italian oregano,
and Sicilian oregano-all cultivars of O. vulgare ssp. hirtum. Some even know
about Turkistan oregano (Origanum tytthantum) from central Asia and showy
oregano (O. pulchellum), which is popular in the Mediterranean region.
But the oregano experience is not confined to a single genus, Origanum. Take,
for example, Cuban oregano, or Spanish thyme, called simply orégano in Spanish.
This aromatic shrub and oregano analog is neither oregano (Origanum) nor thyme
(Thymus), nor is it from Cuba or Spain, for that matter. The scientific name of
this African native is Plectranthus amboinicus.

Mexican oregano

Origanum and Plectranthus both belong to the Lamiaceae, or mint family, so you'd
be forgiven for thinking that it's all just a family thing. But then along comes
yet another wonderful oregano wannabe: Mexican oregano (Lippia graveolens)-also
called orégano in Spanish-a member of the Verbenaceae, or verbena family. Little
known in North America, this "oregano" is a great acquisition for plant
collectors and herb gardeners alike.

Though not a true oregano, Mexican oregano is native to Mexico, as well as
Guatemala and parts of South America. A somewhat ungainly shrub, it grows up to
five feet tall and wide. Its brittle branches are very narrow, stiffly arching,
and arranged in a seemingly haphazard manner. (The plant responds extremely well
to pruning, so consider espaliers or topiaries as alternatives to the natural
zigzag form). Its dark green, highly fragrant, corrugated foliage is
minuscule-about 1/3-inch long by 1/8-inch wide. Tiny, starry-white flowers are
borne intermittently throughout the year in the leaf axils.


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On Jan 25, 5:56 am, "Michael \"Dog3\" Lonergan"
> wrote:

> I don't ordinarily cook Greek food other than the occasional Greek salad,
> Mousaka or gyro. I like to go to a really good restaurant for Greek food.
> [snip]


Besides, at the restaurant you get to throw the plates into the
fireplace....that'd be expensive at home. -aem



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Dimitri wrote:
>
> You'll find a lot of "Greek" recipes on the net.



Comb through used bookstores and look at cookbooks printed as Greek
Orthodox church fundraisers.

My favorite is "The Art of Greek Cookery" from the Women of St. Paul's
Greek Orthodox Church, Hempstead, Long Island NY. Copyright 1961. I
think I got it as an alternate selection when I belonged to the Cookbook
of the Month Club.

Many ethnic cookbooks are awful; some are gems. You take your chances.

gloria p
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cybercat wrote:
>
> Long ago I had some GREAT Greek food in a little place in Fall's Church
> Virginia. It was like beef stew but made with lamb.
>
> There were lots of other dishes that others were having that looked good
> too.
>
> Prior to this, I had only had stuff like gyros and vinegary weird stuff
> wrapped in grape leaves.
>
> Anybody got some good recipes for really good Greek food?


Look for a copy of "Greek With Gusto" . It is full of interesting Greek
recipes.

A lot of my summer grilling is done with Greek inspired marinades, olive
oil and lemon juice with garlic and a bit of oregano. Summer salads are
spliced cucumber, tomato, onion topped with Kalamata olives, Feta cheese a
bit of oregano or marjoram and a good sprinkle of lemon juice and olive
oil.
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In article >,
"cybercat" > wrote:

> Long ago I had some GREAT Greek food in a little place in Fall's Church
> Virginia. It was like beef stew but made with lamb.
>
> There were lots of other dishes that others were having that looked good
> too.
>
> Prior to this, I had only had stuff like gyros and vinegary weird stuff
> wrapped in grape leaves.
>
> Anybody got some good recipes for really good Greek food?


Google for recipes of "Shepherds stew". :-)

My mom used to make an absolutely _killer_ lamb stew using pre-roasted
lamb breast.

I can probably approximate a recipe from memory if you'd like.

It's not written down anywhere and mom is no longer available to
consult, but she is the one that taught me to cook by what I like to
call "flavor memory" if you know what I mean?
--
Peace, Om

Remove _ to validate e-mails.

"My mother never saw the irony in calling me a Son of a bitch" -- Jack Nicholson
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In article >,
Puester > wrote:
>Dimitri wrote:
>>
>> You'll find a lot of "Greek" recipes on the net.

>
>Comb through used bookstores and look at cookbooks printed as Greek
>Orthodox church fundraisers.
>
>My favorite is "The Art of Greek Cookery" from the Women of St. Paul's
>Greek Orthodox Church, Hempstead, Long Island NY. Copyright 1961. I
>think I got it as an alternate selection when I belonged to the Cookbook
>of the Month Club.
>
>Many ethnic cookbooks are awful; some are gems. You take your chances.


From what I hear, the babas and the yayas (don't know what the Greek term
is for the grandmotherly-type church ladies) at most Orthodox parishes -
Russian, Greek, Ukrainian, or mixed - are an inspiration to most of us
Church Kitchen Ladies. On a religious web-forum I'm on, we joke about the
Orthodox luring converts with baklava .

I wish we had more lower-end Greek restaurants around here - most are very
expensive (good but $$$). We can, however, get some good Greek food at
several pan-Med joints nearby and some delis, and true aficinados don't
miss the annual Greek festival.

I had some excellent Greek food on my recent quickie trip to Seattle:
Georgia's on 85th Ave NW in Greenwood, just west of the center with the
Greenwood Market and Freddy's.

Charlotte
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Charlotte L. Blackmer wrote:

> In article >,
> Puester > wrote:
> >Dimitri wrote:
> >>
> >> You'll find a lot of "Greek" recipes on the net.

> >
> >Comb through used bookstores and look at cookbooks printed as Greek
> >Orthodox church fundraisers.
> >
> >My favorite is "The Art of Greek Cookery" from the Women of St. Paul's
> >Greek Orthodox Church, Hempstead, Long Island NY. Copyright 1961. I
> >think I got it as an alternate selection when I belonged to the Cookbook
> >of the Month Club.
> >
> >Many ethnic cookbooks are awful; some are gems. You take your chances.

>
> From what I hear, the babas and the yayas (don't know what the Greek term
> is for the grandmotherly-type church ladies) at most Orthodox parishes -
> Russian, Greek, Ukrainian, or mixed - are an inspiration to most of us
> Church Kitchen Ladies. On a religious web-forum I'm on, we joke about the
> Orthodox luring converts with baklava .



I've had occasion to visit several Greek Orthodox Church "festivals" on
visits to St. Louis (I live in Chicago), the food was tasty and certainly
pleasantly different from the rural Illinois Methodist church basement feeds
I grew up on...


> I wish we had more lower-end Greek restaurants around here - most are very
> expensive (good but $$$). We can, however, get some good Greek food at
> several pan-Med joints nearby and some delis, and true aficinados don't
> miss the annual Greek festival.



Don't Greeks own just about every corner diner where you live? They'll
sometimes have Greek food of varying quality on the menu...


> I had some excellent Greek food on my recent quickie trip to Seattle:
> Georgia's on 85th Ave NW in Greenwood, just west of the center with the
> Greenwood Market and Freddy's.



In my neighborhood here in Chicago (Lakeview) I've noticed that there are
very few gyros joints anymore, the ones on my stretch closed up long ago.
Lotsa Thai - Pan Asian joints have moved in, lots of taquerias, but the
old - fashioned gyros joint is fairly dead in my nabe...

We are lucky to have a splendid Greek Town in Chicago, plenty to choose from
and very good value. But after all these years I still tend to get the
"combo plate" when I go to the Greek Islands or wherever...

My local stupormarket, Treasue Island, is Greek - owned, they feature Greek
stuff in the deli, grocery, etc...

--
Best
Greg




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pfoley > wrote:

> "George" > wrote...
> >
> > http://www.sheepscreek.com/recipes/greek_stew.html

> ===========
> That recipe seems totally different from Irish Lamb Stew and Beef Stew, but
> I guess that is why its called Greek Lamb Stew. I would much prefer the
> Irish Lamb Stew version.


You are comparing apples and oranges, in more way than one. "Irish
Stew" is just so named, it is not generic and actually means something
more or less definite. "Greek Stew" does not exist, just as there is no
"Italian Stew", "American Stew", "French Stew", etc. As in other
countries, there are different stews in Greece, distinguished by their
names, ingredients, and methods and techniques of preparation. No
doubt, generic stews exist in Greece, too, as anywhere else, but by
their very nature they are not particularly "Greek".

Very well known Greek stews are, for example, stifado, yahni,
kokkinisto, kapama, all variously transliterated. Stifado is one of my
favourites. There are numerous versions, made with different kinds of
meats and some of the other ingredients, but one identifying
characteristic is the use of lots of little onions which are peeled but
otherwise left whole.

Victor
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"George" > wrote in message
...
> cybercat wrote:
> > Long ago I had some GREAT Greek food in a little place in Fall's Church
> > Virginia. It was like beef stew but made with lamb.
> >
> > There were lots of other dishes that others were having that looked good
> > too.
> >
> > Prior to this, I had only had stuff like gyros and vinegary weird stuff
> > wrapped in grape leaves.
> >
> > Anybody got some good recipes for really good Greek food?
> >
> >
> >

>
> Greek lamb stew is a classic and easy to make. Pop "Greek lamb stew"
> into Google and the first hit is a good recipe and they include a half
> dozen variations.
>
> http://www.sheepscreek.com/recipes/greek_stew.html

===========
That recipe seems totally different from Irish Lamb Stew and Beef Stew, but
I guess that is why its called Greek Lamb Stew. I would much prefer the
Irish Lamb Stew version. I do love Greek Shish Kebob with either lamb or
beef, peppers, onions and tomatoes over rice, but that is the only Greek
food I know.


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Puester wrote:
> Dimitri wrote:
>
>>
>> You'll find a lot of "Greek" recipes on the net.

>
>
>
> Comb through used bookstores and look at cookbooks printed as Greek
> Orthodox church fundraisers.
>
> My favorite is "The Art of Greek Cookery" from the Women of St. Paul's
> Greek Orthodox Church, Hempstead, Long Island NY. Copyright 1961. I
> think I got it as an alternate selection when I belonged to the Cookbook
> of the Month Club.
>
> Many ethnic cookbooks are awful; some are gems. You take your chances.
>
> gloria p


I bought a nice little Greek paperback cook book in Athens in 1985 while
on my way to Istanbul on business. Use it at least weekly. IIRC it is
titled "Some Greeks Cooking." The English used is funny but it gets the
job done. Best moussaka recipe I've ever used is in it.

George

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George Shirley wrote:
>
> I bought a nice little Greek paperback cook book in Athens in 1985 while
> on my way to Istanbul on business. Use it at least weekly. IIRC it is
> titled "Some Greeks Cooking." The English used is funny but it gets the
> job done. Best moussaka recipe I've ever used is in it.



Share the recipe, please? I've been using the one he
http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/re...ews/views/1432 and am always
interested in improving on a good thing.

--Lia

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pfoley wrote:

> That recipe seems totally different from Irish Lamb Stew and Beef Stew, but
> I guess that is why its called Greek Lamb Stew. I would much prefer the
> Irish Lamb Stew version. I do love Greek Shish Kebob with either lamb or
> beef, peppers, onions and tomatoes over rice, but that is the only Greek
> food I know.


Greek food rules. I love it. I often go to Greek restaurants. They don't
usually have a lot of variety, but instead seem to stick to a few
traditional dishes, mostly with simple ingredients, and done well. My only
problem with greek restaurants is the north americanized version of greek
salad. All you need for a Greek salad is cucumber, onion, tomato, feta,
Kalamata olives, salt and pepper, oregano or marjoram, lemon juice and
olive oil. Chop and slice ingredients, toss them together, season them with
salt pepper, a little oregano and then squeeze some lemon juice over it and
drizzle some olive oil on top. You can't beat it on a hot simmer day.

The typical marinade for grilled meats is olive oil, lemon juice, garlic,
oregano and salt and pepper. It can be used with pork lamb, beef or
chicken.

Even a simple sandwich can be a tasty experience. There is no lunch nicer
than a proper Gyros, or a Slouvaki in pita with onion, tomato and tzatzikis

Greek desserts are amazing. I love Baklava, too bad about my nut problem,
but it is worth suffering for. And then there is Galactaboriko, a sweat
thick custard baked in phyllo pastry and drizzled with a sweet honey syrup.


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"Dave Smith" > wrote in message
...
> pfoley wrote:
>
> > That recipe seems totally different from Irish Lamb Stew and Beef Stew,

but
> > I guess that is why its called Greek Lamb Stew. I would much prefer the
> > Irish Lamb Stew version. I do love Greek Shish Kebob with either lamb or
> > beef, peppers, onions and tomatoes over rice, but that is the only Greek
> > food I know.

>
> Greek food rules. I love it. I often go to Greek restaurants. They don't
> usually have a lot of variety, but instead seem to stick to a few
> traditional dishes, mostly with simple ingredients, and done well. My only
> problem with greek restaurants is the north americanized version of greek
> salad. All you need for a Greek salad is cucumber, onion, tomato, feta,
> Kalamata olives, salt and pepper, oregano or marjoram, lemon juice and
> olive oil. Chop and slice ingredients, toss them together, season them

with
> salt pepper, a little oregano and then squeeze some lemon juice over it

and
> drizzle some olive oil on top. You can't beat it on a hot simmer day.
>
> The typical marinade for grilled meats is olive oil, lemon juice, garlic,
> oregano and salt and pepper. It can be used with pork lamb, beef or
> chicken.
>
> Even a simple sandwich can be a tasty experience. There is no lunch nicer
> than a proper Gyros, or a Slouvaki in pita with onion, tomato and

tzatzikis
>
> Greek desserts are amazing. I love Baklava, too bad about my nut problem,
> but it is worth suffering for. And then there is Galactaboriko, a sweat
> thick custard baked in phyllo pastry and drizzled with a sweet honey

syrup.
===========
Well, now that I think about it, back in the day, I did used to frequent a
Greek deli for the best greek grinder I ever had. They used to grill the
grinder and fill it with sauteed peppers, onions and probably some other
veggie then top it with cheese and stick it under the grinder and melt the
cheese. I have never found another place that did that since and it was
really good
I have heard of that marinade for lamb chops and that salad also sounds
good..


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In article .net>,
Gregory Morrow > wrote:
>
>Charlotte L. Blackmer wrote:
>> I wish we had more lower-end Greek restaurants around here - most are very
>> expensive (good but $$$). We can, however, get some good Greek food at
>> several pan-Med joints nearby and some delis, and true aficinados don't
>> miss the annual Greek festival.

>
>
>Don't Greeks own just about every corner diner where you live? They'll
>sometimes have Greek food of varying quality on the menu...


Actually, no; if they did, I wouldn't be complaining about not much
inexpensive to midrange Greek food, and most of that at pan-Med joints at
that.

(La Mediteranee in Berkeley and SF is pretty good IMO.)

Charlotte
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LOL.... at first glance I read: GEEK food and I was hooked into the
thread.

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On 25 Jan 2007 08:55:16 -0800, "aem" > wrote:

>Besides, at the restaurant you get to throw the plates into the
>fireplace....that'd be expensive at home.



tourist trash

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"Dimitri" > wrote:
>
>
> You'll find a lot of "Greek" recipes on the net. I think there are 3
> important "hints" to Greek food'
>
> First, always use fresh lemons, never use bottled.
> Second, if the recipe calls for oregano they mean Greek Oregano (see
> below)
> Third, always use Fresh Garlic.
>
> Remember, quartered lemons are as much a table condiment as are salt and
> pepper.
>
> Dimitri (yep its a Greek spelling)


Thank you, Dimitri.




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cybercat wrote:
> Long ago I had some GREAT Greek food in a little place in Fall's Church
> Virginia. It was like beef stew but made with lamb.
>
> There were lots of other dishes that others were having that looked good
> too.
>
> Prior to this, I had only had stuff like gyros and vinegary weird stuff
> wrapped in grape leaves.
>
> Anybody got some good recipes for really good Greek food?
>


Here are pointers to some Greek recipes I've posted over the years. The
first is for spanakorizo (spinach cooked with rice in a spicy tomato
sauce). Next is a vegetarian lentil moussaka (that is, I think, very
very good). Then there is gardumpa, about which the less said the
better. Fourth is lamb shanks braised with white wine, tomatoes and
leeks. It was one of the first non-baby foods we fed my daughter. She
kept eating it until she exploded. I could do the same. Finally, there
is my list of URLs for Greek cooking sites.

http://groups.google.com/group/rec.f...4993da80fba253
http://groups.google.com/group/rec.f...99a98260c3fcf6
http://groups.google.com/group/rec.f...cfe7596a7f6f9a
http://groups.google.com/group/rec.f...5fe292c90e17be
http://groups.google.com/group/rec.f...55182d561a5817

-bwg
I got a pocket full of funnies just to show you where I been.

>
>
> --
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Dave Smith > wrote:
> traditional dishes, mostly with simple ingredients, and done well. My only
> problem with greek restaurants is the north americanized version of greek
> salad. All you need for a Greek salad is cucumber, onion, tomato, feta,
> Kalamata olives, salt and pepper, oregano or marjoram, lemon juice and
> olive oil. Chop and slice ingredients, toss them together, season them with
> salt pepper, a little oregano and then squeeze some lemon juice over it and
> drizzle some olive oil on top. You can't beat it on a hot simmer day.


Uh, so what is the north americanized version you have a problem with?
The only greek salads I've seen are the above ingredients, sometimes
served on a bed of lettuce, although the oregano is often missing, and
sometimes the lemon is replaced with vinegar.

Jnospam

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"-bwg" > wrote
>
> Here are pointers to some Greek recipes I've posted over the years. The
> first is for spanakorizo (spinach cooked with rice in a spicy tomato
> sauce). Next is a vegetarian lentil moussaka (that is, I think, very
> very good). Then there is gardumpa, about which the less said the
> better. Fourth is lamb shanks braised with white wine, tomatoes and
> leeks. It was one of the first non-baby foods we fed my daughter. She
> kept eating it until she exploded. I could do the same. Finally, there
> is my list of URLs for Greek cooking sites.
>

[snip great links]

Thank you! I appreciate the time it took you to share this, and
I will peruse it thoroughly. Just what I needed.


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Jnospam wrote:
> Dave Smith > wrote:
> > traditional dishes, mostly with simple ingredients, and done well. My only
> > problem with greek restaurants is the north americanized version of greek
> > salad. All you need for a Greek salad is cucumber, onion, tomato, feta,
> > Kalamata olives, salt and pepper, oregano or marjoram, lemon juice and
> > olive oil. Chop and slice ingredients, toss them together, season them with
> > salt pepper, a little oregano and then squeeze some lemon juice over it and
> > drizzle some olive oil on top. You can't beat it on a hot simmer day.

>
> Uh, so what is the north americanized version you have a problem with?
> The only greek salads I've seen are the above ingredients, sometimes
> served on a bed of lettuce, although the oregano is often missing, and
> sometimes the lemon is replaced with vinegar.



too many places around here serve a "Greek Salad" that is just a regular
salad (mostly lettuce), with a bit of tomato, a bit of crumbled Feta and a
ready made "Greek" dressing. I wouldn't mind if it was a real Greek Salad
( horiatiki) on a bed of lettuce, but not a lettuce salad with just a hint
of Greek to it. I am not a big fan of lettuce.


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pfoley wrote:
>
> > Greek food rules. I love it. I often go to Greek restaurants. They don't
> > usually have a lot of variety, but instead seem to stick to a few
> > traditional dishes, mostly with simple ingredients, and done well. My only
> > problem with greek restaurants is the north americanized version of greek
> > salad. All you need for a Greek salad is cucumber, onion, tomato, feta,
> > Kalamata olives, salt and pepper, oregano or marjoram, lemon juice and
> > olive oil. Chop and slice ingredients, toss them together, season them

> with
> > salt pepper, a little oregano and then squeeze some lemon juice over it

> and
> > drizzle some olive oil on top. You can't beat it on a hot simmer day.
> >
> > The typical marinade for grilled meats is olive oil, lemon juice, garlic,
> > oregano and salt and pepper. It can be used with pork lamb, beef or
> > chicken.
> >
> > Even a simple sandwich can be a tasty experience. There is no lunch nicer
> > than a proper Gyros, or a Slouvaki in pita with onion, tomato and

> tzatzikis
> >
> > Greek desserts are amazing. I love Baklava, too bad about my nut problem,
> > but it is worth suffering for. And then there is Galactaboriko, a sweat
> > thick custard baked in phyllo pastry and drizzled with a sweet honey

> syrup.
> ===========
> Well, now that I think about it, back in the day, I did used to frequent a
> Greek deli for the best greek grinder I ever had. They used to grill the
> grinder and fill it with sauteed peppers, onions and probably some other
> veggie then top it with cheese and stick it under the grinder and melt the
> cheese. I have never found another place that did that since and it was
> really good
> I have heard of that marinade for lamb chops and that salad also sounds
> good..


It works on everything. It is also good with lamb leg or shoulders cubed
and skewered.... shish kebab. It is great for pork tenderloin. Butterfly
a pork tenderloin and pound it out just enough that it is an even thickness
throughout. Marinate in the olive oil and lemon juice mixtures for 4-6
hours (or more) and slap it on a hot grill for just a few minutes per side.
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Default Greek Food

On Wed, 24 Jan 2007 23:14:27 -0500, "cybercat" >
wrote:

>Long ago I had some GREAT Greek food in a little place in Fall's Church
>Virginia. It was like beef stew but made with lamb.
>
>


Was that the Akropol on Broad Street? - Mike

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