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Default Greek Food

Just watched a travel show about Greece that had some interesting but pretty
vaque fool-related information. The narrator said that there is a Greek
restaurant tradition of inviting guests into the kitchen to see what is
cooking and make their choices.

I have little experience with Greek food but love lots of the common
ingredients--feta, olives, tomatoes, seafood.

Favorite Greek dishes, anyone? There was one I had regularly that was a kind
of stew featuring lamb, but I have forgotten the name since we moved away
from Vienna, where the restaurant was.


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cybercat wrote:
>
> Just watched a travel show about Greece that had some interesting but pretty
> vaque fool-related information. The narrator said that there is a Greek


I bet you couldn't take your eyes off the screen
when that information was being presented. :-)
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cyberlikesitGREEKstyle yodeled:

> Just watched a travel show about Greece that had some interesting but

pretty
> vaque fool-related information.

^^^^


Hey, I guess it was targeted to *your* "demographic", hon...!!!


:-)


--
Best
Greg


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On Sep 13, 2:34*pm, "cybercat" > wrote:
> Just watched a travel show about Greece that had some interesting but pretty
> vaque fool-related information. The narrator said that there is a Greek
> restaurant tradition of inviting guests into the kitchen to see what is
> cooking and make their choices.
>
> I have little experience with Greek food but love lots of the common
> ingredients--feta, olives, tomatoes, seafood.
>
> Favorite Greek dishes, anyone? There was one I had regularly that was a kind
> of stew featuring lamb, but I have forgotten the name since we moved away
> from Vienna, where the restaurant was.


Tiropita (cheese-filled phyllo bundles), a great appetizer
Patates Moussaka (potato version of the eggplany dish)
Souvlakia, a grilled meat kebab
Pastitsio, a greek noodle dish with meat sauce and bechamel, is always
good comfort food.

So many, I could go on....

Kris
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cybercat wrote:

> I have little experience with Greek food but love lots of the common
> ingredients--feta, olives, tomatoes, seafood.
>
> Favorite Greek dishes, anyone? There was one I had regularly that was
> a kind of stew featuring lamb, but I have forgotten the name since we
> moved away from Vienna, where the restaurant was.


Made this several times, and it was good.

Title: Midia Sahanaki (Greek Recipe for Mussels)

Source: http://recipes.chef2chef.net/recipe-...8/155360.shtml
---
Ingredients
---
1 kg Mussels (fresh shelled
200 g Feta cheese
1 Green chilli (to taste,
1 lg Tomato
Parsley
Oregano
Salt 'n pepper
Olive oil
Water

---
Instructions
---

THE MESSY BIT: Wash the mussels
individually (don't forget behind the ears!!), making sure no pieces
of shell are still attached, and no sand is left in the flesh. Also
remove the tiny thread you sometimes find in them - it is reported to
be irritating to the stomach if ingested.

THE GOOD BIT:

When the mussels are thoroughly washed and checked, put them in a pan
and add just enough water to cover them. Bring to the boil, and boil
for about five minutes. Then add three tablespoonfuls of olive oil,
and the chilli chopped into ringlets, as well as a handful of not-too-
finely chopped parsley. Grate the tomato, with or without the skin,
it is up to you, and add. Add the salt and pepper (not too much salt,
the mussels have their own). Boil for another fifteen minutes (but
not longer - the mussels will toughen up if boiled too long - they're
funny that way!). About three minutes before taking the pan off the
heat, add the feta broken up into small pieces and stir. Add the
oregano just before you remove the pan from the heat.

THE GREATEST BIT:

Taste it... (8v)))

This dish is very quick to make, the only
hassle being making sure the mussels are thoroughly clean, of course.
It can be reheated over a careful heat (too much heat will make the
feta cheese in it stick to the bottom of the pan and burn) or in a
microwave, without the flavour losing anything.

From: Bryan Hollamby Date: 13 Dec 96 Chile-Heads
List Ž
--
Cheers
Chatty Cathy

Google is my Friend (GIMF)


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Default OT Greeks


"Kris" > wrote in message
...
On Sep 13, 2:34 pm, "cybercat" > wrote:
> Just watched a travel show about Greece that had some interesting but
> pretty
> vaque fool-related information. The narrator said that there is a Greek
> restaurant tradition of inviting guests into the kitchen to see what is
> cooking and make their choices.
>
> I have little experience with Greek food but love lots of the common
> ingredients--feta, olives, tomatoes, seafood.
>
> Favorite Greek dishes, anyone? There was one I had regularly that was a
> kind
> of stew featuring lamb, but I have forgotten the name since we moved away
> from Vienna, where the restaurant was.


Tiropita (cheese-filled phyllo bundles), a great appetizer
Patates Moussaka (potato version of the eggplany dish)
Souvlakia, a grilled meat kebab
Pastitsio, a greek noodle dish with meat sauce and bechamel, is always
good comfort food.

So many, I could go on....

Kris

Why I am proud to be Greek

Because nights in Greece finish in the morning.
Because we drink our coffee slowly and not in 'gulps'.
Because flirting is our national pastime.
Because we go out almost every night, even if we are penniless.
Because we respect our Grandmothers sometimes more than our wives.
Because we know how to 'spend' better than we know how to 'save'.
Because we never visit others empty-handed...we bring a cake or a bottle of
wine
Because we do not share the cost of gasoline with those traveling with us.
Because the word 'filotimo' (helping someone because it is the right thing
to do) doesn't exist in any other language.
Because whenever foreigners cannot find a word, they bloody steal one of
ours!
Because we always make it, albeit in the last moment.
Because we love and hate with passion.
Because we spend our bad and low times with our friends and family; not with
therapists and counselors.
Because Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle were Hellenic and we still quote
them!
Because we invented the theatre.
Because we gave birth to Democracy.
Because we jump-started science.
Because we are proud of our culture, not of our wars.
Because when we were building the Parthenon, the others were still sleeping
under trees.
Because when others created wars, we created the Olympic Games to stop wars.
Because we don't use ketchup or mayonnaise with our food!
Because we get angry quickly, but forget about it even more quickly.
Because Greek men are not ashamed to cry.
Because we dance when we are sad and party when we are happy.
Because we work to live and we do not live to work.
Because 97% of the cosmic stars are named after Hellenics.
Because although we know danger well, we dare.
Because when you shout 'adel fi' ( brother) in the streets, everyone turns
around.
Because 'Greeks do not fight like heroes; heroes fight like Greeks.'
(Winston Churchill, 1941)
Because we speak loudly and laugh even louder!
WHAT MORE IS THERE TO SAY? No one will love you more deeply than a Greek.
Yia sas!

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"Kris" > wrote in

>Tiropita (cheese-filled phyllo bundles), a great appetizer


Aha! I have had Spanakopita! Same as above but with spinach.

>Patates Moussaka (potato version of the eggplany dish)
>Souvlakia, a grilled meat kebab
>Pastitsio, a greek noodle dish with meat sauce and bechamel, is always

good comfort food.


Thanks, Kris! I'm going to look up a recipe for Patates Moussaka.


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"Mark Thorson" > wrote in message
...
> cybercat wrote:
>>
>> Just watched a travel show about Greece that had some interesting but
>> pretty
>> vaque fool-related information. The narrator said that there is a Greek

>
> I bet you couldn't take your eyes off the screen
> when that information was being presented. :-)


TIROPITA (Greek Cheese Pies)


6 large Eggs
1 Lb. Feta Cheese (Imported if available)
1 Lb. Ricotta Cheese
1 Lb. Filo Pastry
¾ Stick of Butter

Beat eggs until frothy. Crumble feta cheese; add slowly to the eggs. Add the
Ricotta Cheese a little at a time. Beat until all ingredients are mixed.

Cut Filo into strips approximately 2-1/2 "to 3 'wide x length of the Filo
sheet.
Take one cut Filo sheet, brush with melted butter first; then drop about one
full teaspoon full of the cheese mix near the end of the Filo strip. Then
carefully fold the strip into a triangle shape, just like folding a flag.
Bake on a buttered pan at 375 degrees for about 20 minutes or until golden
brown.

These can be made well ahead of time and frozen unbaked. Layer the completed
triangles in plastic containers or a cardboard box with wax papers between
each layer. When needed simply remove and bake as noted above.

They will keep for several weeks or more in this manner...

* When using Filo pastry take out only as much as you need to work with.
Keep the strips covered as you work since Filo dries quickly when exposed to
the air for long periods of timer. It becomes brittle and flakes when dry.

CHICKEN IN PHYLLO (KOTOPITA)


1 Whole Chicken Greek BECHAMEL
SAUCE
½ Stalk of Celery ½ Stick of Butter
3 Medium Onions, Chopped 3 Tbsp.. Flour
1 Stick of Butter 1-1/2 Cup
Chicken Broth, heated
Salt, Pepper and Nutmeg 1 Tbsp.. Lemon Juice
3 Eggs 2 Egg Yolks
10 Sheets of Phyllo Dough 1 Dash of Salt
½ Cup Melted Butter
1 Cup of Chicken Broth

Boil chicken; reserve 2-1/2 cups broth. Remove bones and chop; set aside. In
a large saucepan, melt butter. Sauté celery until tender; add onions and
continue cooking until onions are transparent. Add chicken to saucepan and
one cup of broth (reserve other cup for the sauce.). Sauté until all liquid
is absorbed. Remove from heat, cool and add salt, pepper and nutmeg to
taste. Beat eggs until frothy; fold into the cooled chicken mixture.

Prepare phyllo by laying out five sheets, one on top of the other, brushing
each sheet with melted butter, onto jellyroll pan. Place ½ of the mixture
down the center of the phyllo and roll up so it is shaped like a log. Seal
at both ends by pressing down. Brush with melted butter and score top into
1-1/2 inch serving portions. Repeat process with the rest of mixture and
phyllo. Bake at 375 Degrees for 45 minutes or until golden brown. Cool and
slice discarding the end piece if you wish. Top with Béchamel Sauce and
serve, or serve sauce on the side.

Sauce: Melt butter in small saucepan. Remove from heat and stir in flour.
Immediately and all at once add hot broth. Stir until smooth over low heat.
Slightly beat egg yolks with lemon juice. Stir into broth mixture that has
been removed from heat. Season with salt)

:-)

Dimtiri


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Dimitri wrote:
>
> Because 97% of the cosmic stars are named after Hellenics.


Waaaaiiiitt a minute. Maybe in your language.
In ours, most of them have Arabic names.
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"Dimitri" > wrote
> TIROPITA (Greek Cheese Pies)
>
>


[snips]

> CHICKEN IN PHYLLO (KOTOPITA)
>


[snips]

Thank you! Lovely, both. I have handled phyllo twice when making
spanikopita! I could be better at it, but I will learn.




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"Dimitri" > wrote
> Why I am proud to be Greek
>
> Because nights in Greece finish in the morning.
> Because we drink our coffee slowly and not in 'gulps'.
> Because flirting is our national pastime.
> Because we go out almost every night, even if we are penniless.
> Because we respect our Grandmothers sometimes more than our wives.
> Because we know how to 'spend' better than we know how to 'save'.
> Because we never visit others empty-handed...we bring a cake or a bottle
> of wine
> Because we do not share the cost of gasoline with those traveling with us.
> Because the word 'filotimo' (helping someone because it is the right thing
> to do) doesn't exist in any other language.
> Because whenever foreigners cannot find a word, they bloody steal one of
> ours!
> Because we always make it, albeit in the last moment.
> Because we love and hate with passion.
> Because we spend our bad and low times with our friends and family; not
> with therapists and counselors.
> Because Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle were Hellenic and we still quote
> them!
> Because we invented the theatre.
> Because we gave birth to Democracy.
> Because we jump-started science.
> Because we are proud of our culture, not of our wars.
> Because when we were building the Parthenon, the others were still
> sleeping under trees.
> Because when others created wars, we created the Olympic Games to stop
> wars.
> Because we don't use ketchup or mayonnaise with our food!
> Because we get angry quickly, but forget about it even more quickly.
> Because Greek men are not ashamed to cry.
> Because we dance when we are sad and party when we are happy.
> Because we work to live and we do not live to work.
> Because 97% of the cosmic stars are named after Hellenics.
> Because although we know danger well, we dare.
> Because when you shout 'adel fi' ( brother) in the streets, everyone turns
> around.
> Because 'Greeks do not fight like heroes; heroes fight like Greeks.'
> (Winston Churchill, 1941)
> Because we speak loudly and laugh even louder!
> WHAT MORE IS THERE TO SAY? No one will love you more deeply than a
> Greek.
> Yia sas!


Love it all. Couldn't snip it. I agree with this post!!


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Kris wrote:
>
>
> Tiropita (cheese-filled phyllo bundles), a great appetizer
> Patates Moussaka (potato version of the eggplany dish)
> Souvlakia, a grilled meat kebab
> Pastitsio, a greek noodle dish with meat sauce and bechamel, is always
> good comfort food.



Fried Calamari with tzitzki <sp?>
Lamb Kebabs
Galactobourito <sp?> - a rich, sweet custard baked in phyllo and
smothered with syrup.
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On Sep 13, 3:14*pm, "cybercat" > wrote:
> "Dimitri" > wrote
>
> > * * * * *TIROPITA (Greek Cheese Pies)

>
> [snips]
>
> > * * * * * * * * * * * * * CHICKEN IN PHYLLO (KOTOPITA)

>
> [snips]
>
> Thank you! Lovely, both. I have handled phyllo twice when making
> spanikopita! I could be better at it, but I will learn.


The trick to working with phyllo is threefold:

Properly defrost the dough so it won't break apart in the middle.

Work quickly. (so have everything at the ready, like the melted
butter, so you can just concentrate on laying the dough)

Keep very lightly damp paper towel over the yet-to-be-used phyllo
stack. Otherwise it dries quickly and cracks into pieces.

These things (plus practice!) and you will conquer phyllo.

Good luck,
Kris
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cybercat wrote:
> Just watched a travel show about Greece that had some interesting but pretty
> vaque fool-related information. The narrator said that there is a Greek
> restaurant tradition of inviting guests into the kitchen to see what is
> cooking and make their choices.
>
> I have little experience with Greek food but love lots of the common
> ingredients--feta, olives, tomatoes, seafood.
>
> Favorite Greek dishes, anyone? There was one I had regularly that was a kind
> of stew featuring lamb, but I have forgotten the name since we moved away
> from Vienna, where the restaurant was.


If you find a Greek Festival near you, please go. Plenty of Greek arts
& crafts, dancing, drinking and wonderful food.

http://www.greek-fest.com/greekfest.shtml

Becca


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cybercat wrote:
> "Dimitri" > wrote
>> TIROPITA (Greek Cheese Pies)
>>
>>

>
> [snips]
>
>> CHICKEN IN PHYLLO (KOTOPITA)
>>

>
> [snips]
>
> Thank you! Lovely, both. I have handled phyllo twice when making
> spanikopita! I could be better at it, but I will learn.


Phyllo is one of those things that intimidates me. It seems really simple,
but I know I'll screw it up. If I watch someone (in person) prepare it, I
know I'll be able to do it.

kili




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On Sep 13, 1:34�pm, "cybercat" > wrote:
> Just watched a travel show about Greece that had some interesting but pretty
> vaque fool-related information. The narrator said that there is a Greek
> restaurant tradition of inviting guests into the kitchen to see what is
> cooking and make their choices.
>
> I have little experience with Greek food but love lots of the common
> ingredients--feta, olives, tomatoes, seafood.
>
> Favorite Greek dishes, anyone? There was one I had regularly that was a kind
> of stew featuring lamb, but I have forgotten the name since we moved away
> from Vienna, where the restaurant was.


I love Greek food, and as we speak, am fixing Moussaka, and
TzatZaki!!

Recently returned from Greece and it is ttrue, they will invite you
into the kitchen, maybe pull a bit of meat that is cooking off ther
spit and offer it to you.
Often give you a little taste of something or other and let you decide
what ever you want.
The two dishes I am fixing are some of my favorite Greek foods, but
they offer many Lamb
dishes that are to die for.

The Moussaka I make has lamb, eggplant and potatoes in it, with a
bechamel sauce over it Thern is baked in the oven.

Rosie
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On Sep 13, 5:01 pm, rosie > wrote:
> On Sep 13, 1:34 pm, "cybercat" > wrote:
>
> > Just watched a travel show about Greece that had some interesting but pretty
> > vaque fool-related information. The narrator said that there is a Greek
> > restaurant tradition of inviting guests into the kitchen to see what is
> > cooking and make their choices.

>
> > I have little experience with Greek food but love lots of the common
> > ingredients--feta, olives, tomatoes, seafood.

>
> > Favorite Greek dishes, anyone? There was one I had regularly that was a kind
> > of stew featuring lamb, but I have forgotten the name since we moved away
> > from Vienna, where the restaurant was.

>
> I love Greek food, and as we speak, am fixing Moussaka, and
> TzatZaki!!
>
> Recently returned from Greece and it is ttrue, they will invite you
> into the kitchen, maybe pull a bit of meat that is cooking off ther
> spit and offer it to you.
> Often give you a little taste of something or other and let you decide
> what ever you want.
> The two dishes I am fixing are some of my favorite Greek foods, but
> they offer many Lamb
> dishes that are to die for.
>
> The Moussaka I make has lamb, eggplant and potatoes in it, with a
> bechamel sauce over it Thern is baked in the oven.
>
> Rosie



I almost forgot that we sometimes talk about food here.

Stuffed grape leaves have a Greek version, though I was intoduced to
them by an old Armenian woman.

One of my favorite comfort foods is Taramasalata. I've seen jars
labled this, with some kind of relish-looking stuff inside. Never
tried it. Next time I see it I will. What I've got from varioius
recipie sources, and have had in restaurants, is starch based. Mashed
bread and potatoes, garlic, olive oil and, most importantly, tarama -
carp roe. I use it as a condiment/dip sort of thing. I'm craving it,
but can't find the tarama here in white suburbia. Made it with caviar
once, but that was expensivlely wasteful and not as good.

I'm sure that there are people here who will correct me, and I
welcome, look foreward to it. And maybe tell me what that stuff in
the jars is. I'll try yours, and just call my stuff "fishy garlic
potato dip".

Bulka
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"cybercat" > fnord
:

> Just watched a travel show about Greece that had some interesting but
> pretty vaque fool-related information. The narrator said that there is
> a Greek restaurant tradition of inviting guests into the kitchen to
> see what is cooking and make their choices.
>
> I have little experience with Greek food but love lots of the common
> ingredients--feta, olives, tomatoes, seafood.
>
> Favorite Greek dishes, anyone? There was one I had regularly that was
> a kind of stew featuring lamb, but I have forgotten the name since we
> moved away from Vienna, where the restaurant was.
>
>


Anything with tzatziki on the side, particularly keftes and gyros. I
also like spanakopita, tyropita, dolma (I still need to get the recipe
from the lady who lives across the street from my mom!),skordalia,
saganaki, moussaka, avgolemono, taramosalata.... Hell, I *love* Greek
food! One of my favorite things about living in metro Detroit is the
ubiquitous "Greek coney", where you get a coney dog with baklava for
dessert (among other Greek specialties and diner foods).

--
Saerah (If I could have sheep's milk feta and kasseri every day, I'd be
a happy woman!)

"Welcome to Usenet, Biatch! Adapt or haul ass!"
- some hillbilly from FLl, I l
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On Sep 13, 6:59*pm, bulka > wrote:
> On Sep 13, 5:01 pm, rosie > wrote:
>
>
>
>
>
> > On Sep 13, 1:34 pm, "cybercat" > wrote:

>
> > > Just watched a travel show about Greece that had some interesting but pretty
> > > vaque fool-related information. The narrator said that there is a Greek
> > > restaurant tradition of inviting guests into the kitchen to see what is
> > > cooking and make their choices.

>
> > > I have little experience with Greek food but love lots of the common
> > > ingredients--feta, olives, tomatoes, seafood.

>
> > > Favorite Greek dishes, anyone? There was one I had regularly that was a kind
> > > of stew featuring lamb, but I have forgotten the name since we moved away
> > > from Vienna, where the restaurant was.

>
> > I love Greek food, and as we speak, am fixing Moussaka, and
> > TzatZaki!!

>
> > Recently returned from Greece and it is ttrue, they will invite you
> > into the kitchen, maybe pull a bit of meat that is cooking *off ther
> > spit and offer it to you.
> > Often give you a little taste of something or other and let you decide
> > what ever you want.
> > The two dishes I am fixing are some of my favorite Greek foods, but
> > they offer many Lamb
> > dishes that are to die for.

>
> > The Moussaka I make has lamb, eggplant and potatoes in it, with a
> > bechamel sauce over it Thern is baked in the oven.

>
> > Rosie

>
> I almost forgot that we sometimes talk about food here.
>
> Stuffed grape leaves have a Greek version, though I was intoduced to
> them by an old Armenian woman.
>
> One of my favorite comfort foods is Taramasalata. *I've seen jars
> labled this, with some kind of relish-looking stuff inside. *Never
> tried it. *Next time I see it *I will. *What I've got from varioius
> recipie sources, and have had in restaurants, is starch based. *Mashed
> bread and potatoes, garlic, olive oil and, most importantly, tarama -
> carp roe. *I use it as a condiment/dip sort of thing. *I'm craving it,
> but can't find the tarama here in white suburbia. *Made it with caviar
> once, but that was expensivlely wasteful and not as good.
>
> I'm sure that there are people here who will correct me, and I
> welcome, look foreward to it. *And maybe tell me what that stuff in
> the jars is. *I'll try yours, and just call my stuff "fishy garlic
> potato dip".
>
> Bulka- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -


I think you may be combining two Greek dips? Taramasala is the fish
roe dip/spread. Skordalia is the garlicky potato spread.

Both are great, regardless.

Kris
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Dimitri wrote:
>
> "Kris" > wrote in message
> ...
> On Sep 13, 2:34 pm, "cybercat" > wrote:
>> Just watched a travel show about Greece that had some interesting but
>> pretty
>> vaque fool-related information. The narrator said that there is a Greek
>> restaurant tradition of inviting guests into the kitchen to see what is
>> cooking and make their choices.
>>
>> I have little experience with Greek food but love lots of the common
>> ingredients--feta, olives, tomatoes, seafood.
>>
>> Favorite Greek dishes, anyone? There was one I had regularly that was
>> a kind
>> of stew featuring lamb, but I have forgotten the name since we moved away
>> from Vienna, where the restaurant was.

>
> Tiropita (cheese-filled phyllo bundles), a great appetizer
> Patates Moussaka (potato version of the eggplany dish)
> Souvlakia, a grilled meat kebab
> Pastitsio, a greek noodle dish with meat sauce and bechamel, is always
> good comfort food.
>
> So many, I could go on....
>
> Kris
>
> Why I am proud to be Greek
>
> Because nights in Greece finish in the morning.
> Because we drink our coffee slowly and not in 'gulps'.
> Because flirting is our national pastime.
> Because we go out almost every night, even if we are penniless.
> Because we respect our Grandmothers sometimes more than our wives.
> Because we know how to 'spend' better than we know how to 'save'.
> Because we never visit others empty-handed...we bring a cake or a bottle
> of wine
> Because we do not share the cost of gasoline with those traveling with us.
> Because the word 'filotimo' (helping someone because it is the right
> thing to do) doesn't exist in any other language.
> Because whenever foreigners cannot find a word, they bloody steal one of
> ours!
> Because we always make it, albeit in the last moment.
> Because we love and hate with passion.
> Because we spend our bad and low times with our friends and family; not
> with therapists and counselors.
> Because Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle were Hellenic and we still quote
> them!
> Because we invented the theatre.
> Because we gave birth to Democracy.
> Because we jump-started science.
> Because we are proud of our culture, not of our wars.
> Because when we were building the Parthenon, the others were still
> sleeping under trees.
> Because when others created wars, we created the Olympic Games to stop
> wars.
> Because we don't use ketchup or mayonnaise with our food!
> Because we get angry quickly, but forget about it even more quickly.
> Because Greek men are not ashamed to cry.
> Because we dance when we are sad and party when we are happy.
> Because we work to live and we do not live to work.
> Because 97% of the cosmic stars are named after Hellenics.
> Because although we know danger well, we dare.
> Because when you shout 'adel fi' ( brother) in the streets, everyone
> turns around.
> Because 'Greeks do not fight like heroes; heroes fight like Greeks.'
> (Winston Churchill, 1941)
> Because we speak loudly and laugh even louder!
> WHAT MORE IS THERE TO SAY? No one will love you more deeply than a Greek.
> Yia sas!


Opa!

Becca


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kilikini wrote:
>
>> Thank you! Lovely, both. I have handled phyllo twice when making
>> spanikopita! I could be better at it, but I will learn.

>
> Phyllo is one of those things that intimidates me. It seems really simple,
> but I know I'll screw it up. If I watch someone (in person) prepare it, I
> know I'll be able to do it



It would be a lot more intimidating if you had to start by making the
pastry, but buying it frozen skips that step. It really isn't that bad.
You just need to be prepared and work fast. You use several lawyers
so you can make mistakes and cover then up.... literally.

Make sure that your pastry is completely thawed out. It comes in a
box and wrapped in plastic. Have all your ingredients on hand and ready
to use and a damp cloth cover it and keep it from drying out. Plyllo
forgiving stuff. The results are usually so tasty that no one will
notice that you tore a few sheets and patched them together.



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Dave Smith said...

> kilikini wrote:
>>
>>> Thank you! Lovely, both. I have handled phyllo twice when making
>>> spanikopita! I could be better at it, but I will learn.

>>
>> Phyllo is one of those things that intimidates me. It seems really
>> simple, but I know I'll screw it up. If I watch someone (in person)
>> prepare it, I know I'll be able to do it

>
>
> It would be a lot more intimidating if you had to start by making the
> pastry, but buying it frozen skips that step. It really isn't that bad.
> You just need to be prepared and work fast. You use several lawyers
> so you can make mistakes and cover then up.... literally.
>
> Make sure that your pastry is completely thawed out. It comes in a
> box and wrapped in plastic. Have all your ingredients on hand and ready
> to use and a damp cloth cover it and keep it from drying out. Plyllo
> forgiving stuff. The results are usually so tasty that no one will
> notice that you tore a few sheets and patched them together.



There's a Greek food stand at the Reading Terminal Market in Philly that
I've ALWAYS meant to try but gravity pulls me towards cheesesteaks a few
steps away.

Andy
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In article >,
Dave Smith > wrote:

> kilikini wrote:
> >
> >> Thank you! Lovely, both. I have handled phyllo twice when making
> >> spanikopita! I could be better at it, but I will learn.

> >
> > Phyllo is one of those things that intimidates me. It seems really simple,
> > but I know I'll screw it up. If I watch someone (in person) prepare it, I
> > know I'll be able to do it

>
>
> It would be a lot more intimidating if you had to start by making the
> pastry, but buying it frozen skips that step. It really isn't that bad.
> You just need to be prepared and work fast. You use several lawyers
> so you can make mistakes and cover then up.... literally.
>
> Make sure that your pastry is completely thawed out. It comes in a
> box and wrapped in plastic. Have all your ingredients on hand and ready
> to use and a damp cloth cover it and keep it from drying out. Plyllo
> forgiving stuff. The results are usually so tasty that no one will
> notice that you tore a few sheets and patched them together.


Mom and I helped an Italian friend make Phyllo once. She covered the
entire table with a clean white cloth and dusted it with flour. I
remember helping her stretch the dough sheet over the entire table. ;-)
I was just a little kid.

I'd rather buy the frozen. <g>
--
Peace! Om

"If you don't read the newspaper you are uninformed; if you do read the newspaper you are misinformed." --Mark Twain
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On Sat, 13 Sep 2008 15:59:37 -0700 (PDT), bulka wrote:
>
> One of my favorite comfort foods is Taramasalata. I've seen jars
> labled this, with some kind of relish-looking stuff inside. Never
> tried it. Next time I see it I will. What I've got from varioius
> recipie sources, and have had in restaurants, is starch based. Mashed
> bread and potatoes, garlic, olive oil and, most importantly, tarama -
> carp roe. I use it as a condiment/dip sort of thing. I'm craving it,
> but can't find the tarama here in white suburbia. Made it with caviar
> once, but that was expensivlely wasteful and not as good.
>
> I'm sure that there are people here who will correct me, and I
> welcome, look foreward to it. And maybe tell me what that stuff in
> the jars is. I'll try yours, and just call my stuff "fishy garlic
> potato dip".
>
> Bulka


i love that stuff. let us know if you find a good brand in a jar.

your pal,
blake


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On Sun, 14 Sep 2008 07:36:27 -0500, Andy <q> wrote:

>There's a Greek food stand at the Reading Terminal Market in Philly that
>I've ALWAYS meant to try but gravity pulls me towards cheesesteaks a few
>steps away.



Sounds like you need to get to Philly more often!


--
I never worry about diets. The only carrots that interest me are the number of carats in a diamond.

Mae West


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On Sun, 14 Sep 2008 08:09:36 -0500, Omelet >
wrote:

>Mom and I helped an Italian friend make Phyllo once. She covered the
>entire table with a clean white cloth and dusted it with flour. I
>remember helping her stretch the dough sheet over the entire table. ;-)
>I was just a little kid.
>

What a great experience! I'm too chicken to even try. I have to
conquer flat pasta first (no pasta machines for me).

>I'd rather buy the frozen. <g>


Does frozen thaw correctly for you? Every time I've done that, I end
up with "wet" spots that turn into holes.... no matter how slowly I
thaw it. Fortunately, I can buy phyllo fresh - so I have a nice half
way point between buying frozen and making it myself.



--
I never worry about diets. The only carrots that interest me are the number of carats in a diamond.

Mae West
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In article >, sf wrote:

> On Sun, 14 Sep 2008 08:09:36 -0500, Omelet >
> wrote:
>
> >Mom and I helped an Italian friend make Phyllo once. She covered the
> >entire table with a clean white cloth and dusted it with flour. I
> >remember helping her stretch the dough sheet over the entire table. ;-)
> >I was just a little kid.
> >

> What a great experience! I'm too chicken to even try. I have to
> conquer flat pasta first (no pasta machines for me).


Use a 1" dowel as a roller. That's what I've seen around here. I had
mom's pasta machine but I used it so little, I was glad to give it to
sis' when she asked me for it. She will use it more frequently.

I had an interesting childhood where preparing stuff from scratch was
concerned. I feel blessed really.

Maria and Leo were from Italy and they owned "Leo's Italian Restaurant"
in Los Angeles. We were good friends with them for years, then they
suddenly disappeared. We think they may have moved back to Italy. We
never heard from them again.

My sister and I bussed tables as kids.

>
> >I'd rather buy the frozen. <g>

>
> Does frozen thaw correctly for you? Every time I've done that, I end
> up with "wet" spots that turn into holes.... no matter how slowly I
> thaw it. Fortunately, I can buy phyllo fresh - so I have a nice half
> way point between buying frozen and making it myself.


For the most part. :-) But holes are easily patched. The final recipe
does not seem to care.

My sister and I only use it for Baklava.
--
Peace! Om

"If you don't read the newspaper you are uninformed; if you do read the newspaper you are misinformed." --Mark Twain
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On Sun, 14 Sep 2008 10:52:51 -0500, Omelet >
wrote:

>In article >, sf wrote:
>
>> On Sun, 14 Sep 2008 08:09:36 -0500, Omelet >
>> wrote:
>>
>> >I'd rather buy the frozen. <g>

>>
>> Does frozen thaw correctly for you? Every time I've done that, I end
>> up with "wet" spots that turn into holes.... no matter how slowly I
>> thaw it. Fortunately, I can buy phyllo fresh - so I have a nice half
>> way point between buying frozen and making it myself.

>
>For the most part. :-) But holes are easily patched. The final recipe
>does not seem to care.
>
>My sister and I only use it for Baklava.


Aha, I see. I use it mainly for appetizer sized triangle pastries
It's a pain to work around the holes, IMO.



--
I never worry about diets. The only carrots that interest me are the number of carats in a diamond.

Mae West
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Sorry, either I deleted or didn't get the OP.

On Sun, 14 Sep 2008 15:14:35 GMT, blake murphy
> wrote:

>On Sat, 13 Sep 2008 15:59:37 -0700 (PDT), bulka wrote:
>>
>> One of my favorite comfort foods is Taramasalata. I've seen jars
>> labled this, with some kind of relish-looking stuff inside. Never
>> tried it. Next time I see it I will. What I've got from varioius
>> recipie sources, and have had in restaurants, is starch based. Mashed
>> bread and potatoes, garlic, olive oil and, most importantly, tarama -
>> carp roe. I use it as a condiment/dip sort of thing. I'm craving it,
>> but can't find the tarama here in white suburbia. Made it with caviar
>> once, but that was expensivlely wasteful and not as good.


Never heard of Tamara until this thread. Bulka, try here
http://www.greekinternetmarket.com/1403-08001.html


--
I never worry about diets. The only carrots that interest me are the number of carats in a diamond.

Mae West
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In article >, sf wrote:

> On Sun, 14 Sep 2008 10:52:51 -0500, Omelet >
> wrote:
>
> >In article >, sf wrote:
> >
> >> On Sun, 14 Sep 2008 08:09:36 -0500, Omelet >
> >> wrote:
> >>
> >> >I'd rather buy the frozen. <g>
> >>
> >> Does frozen thaw correctly for you? Every time I've done that, I end
> >> up with "wet" spots that turn into holes.... no matter how slowly I
> >> thaw it. Fortunately, I can buy phyllo fresh - so I have a nice half
> >> way point between buying frozen and making it myself.

> >
> >For the most part. :-) But holes are easily patched. The final recipe
> >does not seem to care.
> >
> >My sister and I only use it for Baklava.

>
> Aha, I see. I use it mainly for appetizer sized triangle pastries
> It's a pain to work around the holes, IMO.


Well, if you want triangle pastries, try making a cake pan of them and
cutting them to the shape you want when they are done? :-)
--
Peace! Om

"If you don't read the newspaper you are uninformed; if you do read the newspaper you are misinformed." --Mark Twain


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Tarpon Springs Florida Greek Festival = Baklava, Baklava, and more
Baklava Would not miss it ever. Grandma Jo

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> Never heard of Tamara until this thread. Bulka, try herehttp://www.greekinternetmarket.com/1403-08001.html
>
> --
> I never worry about diets. The only carrots that interest me are the number of carats in a diamond.
>
> Mae West


Thanks.

I don't shop on-line, and food coming by mail just seems wrong.

But, thanks for the thought. And, since you've never heard of it, my
advice is - if you happen to find some, eat it. It is good stuff.

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Joann Phillips wrote:
> Tarpon Springs Florida Greek Festival = Baklava, Baklava, and more
> Baklava Would not miss it ever. Grandma Jo
>

Taste of the Danforth in Toronto in early August.
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On Sep 13, 2:34*pm, "cybercat" > wrote:
> Just watched a travel show about Greece that had some interesting but pretty
> vaque fool-related information. The narrator said that there is a Greek
> restaurant tradition of inviting guests into the kitchen to see what is
> cooking and make their choices.
>
> I have little experience with Greek food but love lots of the common
> ingredients--feta, olives, tomatoes, seafood.
>
> Favorite Greek dishes, anyone? There was one I had regularly that was a kind
> of stew featuring lamb, but I have forgotten the name since we moved away
> from Vienna, where the restaurant was.


Baklava. I love sweet gooey deserts and Greek baklava is fantastic.

There was this little Greek bakery in Sarnia Ontario ......


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On Sep 14, 1:51*pm, (Joann Phillips) wrote:
> Tarpon Springs Florida Greek Festival = * * Baklava, Baklava, and more
> Baklava * * * * *Would not miss it *ever. Grandma *Jo


Here here. Bring on the baklava and puros.

John Kane Kingston ON Canada

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John Kane wrote:
>
> On Sep 14, 1:51 pm, (Joann Phillips) wrote:
> > Tarpon Springs Florida Greek Festival = Baklava, Baklava, and more
> > Baklava Would not miss it ever. Grandma Jo

>
> Here here. Bring on the baklava and puros.


It was at a little Persian bakery on Telegraph Avenue
in south Berkeley or north Oakland where I bought
baklava that I first saw avocado used in baked goods.
I had always viewed avocado as an ingrediant to be
used raw. But when you bake avocado, it is transformed
into a caky texture which is also nice. It's very
similar to the transformation that happens to cream
cheese when you bake it.
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On Sun, 14 Sep 2008 12:35:51 -0500, Omelet >
wrote:

>In article >, sf wrote:
>
>> On Sun, 14 Sep 2008 10:52:51 -0500, Omelet >
>> wrote:
>>
>> >In article >, sf wrote:
>> >
>> >> On Sun, 14 Sep 2008 08:09:36 -0500, Omelet >
>> >> wrote:
>> >>
>> >> >I'd rather buy the frozen. <g>
>> >>
>> >> Does frozen thaw correctly for you? Every time I've done that, I end
>> >> up with "wet" spots that turn into holes.... no matter how slowly I
>> >> thaw it. Fortunately, I can buy phyllo fresh - so I have a nice half
>> >> way point between buying frozen and making it myself.
>> >
>> >For the most part. :-) But holes are easily patched. The final recipe
>> >does not seem to care.
>> >
>> >My sister and I only use it for Baklava.

>>
>> Aha, I see. I use it mainly for appetizer sized triangle pastries
>> It's a pain to work around the holes, IMO.

>
>Well, if you want triangle pastries, try making a cake pan of them and
>cutting them to the shape you want when they are done? :-)


Not the same! Triangle pastries are rolled like a flag is folded.


--
I never worry about diets. The only carrots that interest me are the number of carats in a diamond.

Mae West
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In article >, sf wrote:

> >> >My sister and I only use it for Baklava.
> >>
> >> Aha, I see. I use it mainly for appetizer sized triangle pastries
> >> It's a pain to work around the holes, IMO.

> >
> >Well, if you want triangle pastries, try making a cake pan of them and
> >cutting them to the shape you want when they are done? :-)

>
> Not the same! Triangle pastries are rolled like a flag is folded.


I kinda figured as much. Might be harder then.
Wish I could be of more help on that one, but Phyllo does "patch" well.
--
Peace! Om

"If you don't read the newspaper you are uninformed; if you do read the newspaper you are misinformed." --Mark Twain
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said...

> On Sun, 14 Sep 2008 07:36:27 -0500, Andy <q> wrote:
>
>>There's a Greek food stand at the Reading Terminal Market in Philly that
>>I've ALWAYS meant to try but gravity pulls me towards cheesesteaks a few
>>steps away.

>
>
> Sounds like you need to get to Philly more often!



sf,

I need to get AWAY FROM Philly more often!!!

Best,

Andy
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