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Old 15-01-2007, 03:21 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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It came to my attention awhile ago the there are semi-fixed temperatures
ranges and oil amounts for panfry and sautee. That panfry temps are a
little lower than the sautee temps and requires more oil. But what is the
cooking method that requires a little higher temp and more oil than sautee?

In the past I always used the term panfry as meaning cooked in a pan with
say 1/8 to 1/4 inch oil at the higher end of medium high; where I should of
used a different term.

And for sautee the medium range of medium high with just enough oil to
barely cover the pan.

News to me:
Apparently pan frying reqiures a slightly lower temp than sautee.


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Old 15-01-2007, 03:44 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Mr Libido Incognito wrote:
It came to my attention awhile ago the there are semi-fixed temperatures
ranges and oil amounts for panfry and sautee. That panfry temps are a
little lower than the sautee temps and requires more oil. But what is the
cooking method that requires a little higher temp and more oil than sautee?

In the past I always used the term panfry as meaning cooked in a pan with
say 1/8 to 1/4 inch oil at the higher end of medium high; where I should of
used a different term.

And for sautee the medium range of medium high with just enough oil to
barely cover the pan.

News to me:
Apparently pan frying reqiures a slightly lower temp than sautee.


If I understand your question correctly what your asking is at what
temperature to fry food. If so than my only question is which food?

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Old 15-01-2007, 04:04 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Sheldon wrote on 15 Jan 2007 in rec.food.cooking


Mr Libido Incognito wrote:
It came to my attention awhile ago the there are semi-fixed
temperatures ranges and oil amounts for panfry and sautee. That
panfry temps are a little lower than the sautee temps and requires
more oil. But what is the cooking method that requires a little
higher temp and more oil than sautee?

In the past I always used the term panfry as meaning cooked in a pan
with say 1/8 to 1/4 inch oil at the higher end of medium high; where
I should of used a different term.

And for sautee the medium range of medium high with just enough oil
to barely cover the pan.

News to me:
Apparently pan frying reqiures a slightly lower temp than sautee.


If I understand your question correctly what your asking is at what
temperature to fry food. If so than my only question is which food?



No you don't understand my question...perhaps I stated it wrongly.

I'm asking what is the name of the cooking technique that requires higher
heat and more oil than sautee.

An example of stuff cooked...say a stirfry but not in a wok, say
browning/searing some meat that you will finish in the oven at 375F.

No... not deep fry.

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Old 15-01-2007, 05:37 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Mr Libido Incognito wrote:
Sheldon wrote:
Mr Libido Incognito wrote:
It came to my attention awhile ago the there are semi-fixed
temperatures ranges and oil amounts for panfry and sautee. That
panfry temps are a little lower than the sautee temps and requires
more oil. But what is the cooking method that requires a little
higher temp and more oil than sautee?

In the past I always used the term panfry as meaning cooked in a pan
with say 1/8 to 1/4 inch oil at the higher end of medium high; where
I should of used a different term.

And for sautee the medium range of medium high with just enough oil
to barely cover the pan.

News to me:
Apparently pan frying reqiures a slightly lower temp than sautee.


If I understand your question correctly what your asking is at what
temperature to fry food. If so than my only question is which food?



No you don't understand my question...perhaps I stated it wrongly.

I'm asking what is the name of the cooking technique that requires higher
heat and more oil than sautee.


"Higher and more than" are not specifics.

An example of stuff cooked...say a stirfry but not in a wok, say
browning/searing some meat that you will finish in the oven at 375F.


"Stuff" is not a type of food... and stuff is certainly not a cooking
technique as in frying... you're confusing methodology with
quantification.

You really do need to learn how to write... I'm surprised you can read
a recipe and comprehend... perhaps you can't, which would explain your
post.

Saute and stir fry are exactly precisely synonomous. Quantity of oil
used is directly proportional to the quantity of food, and whatever fat
fetishes one has. What type of cooking vessel one chooses makes no
nevermind, so long as it doesn't leak. Deep frying implys that the fat
is deep enough to completely submerge the food, but the same results
can be achieved with only enough fat to submerge food halfway, if one
is experienced. How much fat the food will absorb is primarily a
product of cooking temperature, and secondarily the type of food.

But you're talking about utilizing two different cooking methods, as
many recipes do.

You heard of Shake N' Bake... well you're doing Sear N' Bake

Frying simply means cooking in fat... only parameters to consider for
choosing a cooking temperature are type of food and smoke point, which
is a very narrow range, all frying is done somewhere between
350F-400F, with the majority occuring at/near 375F. You really
don't have much of a choice regarding frying temperatures... most all
frying is done within a ten degree range. Experineced cooks don't
measure fryiing temperature, they observe cooking results and
interpolate, something only experience can impart.

I don't think you really have any question... you're merely
illustrating that you're confused... did you have too much gin last
night... I'm giving you the benefit of any doubt so don't get
emotional, eh.

Sheldon

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Old 15-01-2007, 07:35 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Sheldon wrote on 15 Jan 2007 in rec.food.cooking



But you're talking about utilizing two different cooking methods, as
many recipes do.

You heard of Shake N' Bake... well you're doing Sear N' Bake

Frying simply means cooking in fat... only parameters to consider for
choosing a cooking temperature are type of food and smoke point, which
is a very narrow range, all frying is done somewhere between
350F-400F, with the majority occuring at/near 375F. You really
don't have much of a choice regarding frying temperatures... most all
frying is done within a ten degree range. Experineced cooks don't
measure fryiing temperature, they observe cooking results and
interpolate, something only experience can impart.

I don't think you really have any question... you're merely
illustrating that you're confused... did you have too much gin last
night... I'm giving you the benefit of any doubt so don't get
emotional, eh.

Sheldon



Thanks for that sheldon, that proves it isn't the way I wrote the question
that was the problem. But instead the way you interperted it. Still
awaiting an answer...


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Old 15-01-2007, 09:01 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Mr Libido Incognito wrote:
Sheldon wrote on 15 Jan 2007 in rec.food.cooking


But you're talking about utilizing two different cooking methods, as
many recipes do.

You heard of Shake N' Bake... well you're doing Sear N' Bake

Frying simply means cooking in fat... only parameters to consider for
choosing a cooking temperature are type of food and smoke point, which
is a very narrow range, all frying is done somewhere between
350F-400F, with the majority occuring at/near 375F. You really
don't have much of a choice regarding frying temperatures... most all
frying is done within a ten degree range. Experineced cooks don't
measure fryiing temperature, they observe cooking results and
interpolate, something only experience can impart.

I don't think you really have any question... you're merely
illustrating that you're confused... did you have too much gin last
night... I'm giving you the benefit of any doubt so don't get
emotional, eh.

Sheldon



Thanks for that sheldon, that proves it isn't the way I wrote the question
that was the problem. But instead the way you interperted it. Still
awaiting an answer...


If a long time lurker can come out and play, may I try to answer your
question?

The types of frying I know of are Deep fat frying, Pan frying, Saute,
and stir frying. I guess you could place searing in there, too, under
the umbrella of "pan frying".

Deep fat frying is when you submerge it under the fat and it's cooked at
usually higher temperatures. Not all cooking in deep fat is frying as
you can poach in deep fat, too.

Pan frying is done at moderate to high temp, more oil than a saute. You
are trying to FRY the food without having to submerge it. You also are
trying to get thick fond on the bottom of your pan.

Saute is when you cook something in little fat and keep it moving around
the pan with lots of room all around. The pan is fairly empty. The heat
is usually high moderate to high. You are trying to sear the outside of
the food quickly. You get less fond because the food is so briefly left
in the pan.

Stir frying is always very high heat. Fat amount is whatever you need to
use or is appropriate to the dish. The food is stirred or moved around
the pan but usually only after an initial browning sear. You can have
lots of food in the pan during stir frying as opposed to saute.

This is how I have always understood the terms. It's more a definition
of temperature and method than amount of fat in the pan. I've noticed
however, in the last few years how correct terms have disappeared from
recipes in books, magazines, Internet and tv show recipes. Now they just
say what size pan or pot and use the distinct term "cook" the food. I
guess it's a total dumbdown for the newbie cooks but sure isn't very
exact or educational.

Hope you don't mind my butting in for a minute or two.

Melondy
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Old 15-01-2007, 11:31 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Melondy Hill wrote on 15 Jan 2007 in rec.food.cooking

Hope you don't mind my butting in for a minute or two.

Melondy



Thank you...Apparently pan fry is the correct term ....I was looking for.
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Old 15-01-2007, 11:54 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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In article ,
Melondy Hill wrote:

This is how I have always understood the terms. It's more a definition
of temperature and method than amount of fat in the pan. I've noticed
however, in the last few years how correct terms have disappeared from
recipes in books, magazines, Internet and tv show recipes. Now they just
say what size pan or pot and use the distinct term "cook" the food. I
guess it's a total dumbdown for the newbie cooks but sure isn't very
exact or educational.

Hope you don't mind my butting in for a minute or two.

Melondy


It is exactly a total dumbdown for inexperienced cooks. I had an
interesting conversation about it with the former editor of the local
rag's food section. I hadn't noticed it (because I don't read cookbooks
the way she still does) but she pointed out how method instructions have
changed. "They don't teach how to cream butter and sugar in Home Ec
classes any more. If you can find a Home Ec class."

I like your explanations, Melondy. Thanks for coming forth. Since you
have, I'm curious about something. You can email me if you wish. Why
do you lurk and not post? What do you get from the group? No insults
or anything -- just curiosity. Thanks. :-)
--
-Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
http://web.mac.com/barbschaller - blahblahblog -
1/11/2007,Pork Tenderloin and Oven Roasted Potatoes
http://jamlady.eboard.com
http://www.caringbridge.org/visit/amytaylor
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Old 16-01-2007, 12:32 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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It is exactly a total dumbdown for inexperienced cooks. I had an
interesting conversation about it with the former editor of the local
rag's food section. I hadn't noticed it (because I don't read cookbooks
the way she still does) but she pointed out how method instructions have
changed. "They don't teach how to cream butter and sugar in Home Ec
classes any more. If you can find a Home Ec class."

I like your explanations, Melondy. Thanks for coming forth. Since you
have, I'm curious about something. You can email me if you wish. Why
do you lurk and not post? What do you get from the group? No insults
or anything -- just curiosity. Thanks. :-)


Barb,

I found this very interesting and have realized the same thing with each
newer edition cookbook I acquire. When I got married in 1987 I received a
copy of The Joy of Cooking, The Complete Betty Crocker Cookbook, and The
Illustrated Cook. All three are still the ones I use most and that have the
"tried and trues" that I have memorized.

Newer cookbooks don't seem to require any understanding of the mechanics of
cooking and food preparation at all. Most people don't have any idea that
there are different grades of beef, varieties of vegetables, degrees of
pasta doneness, etcetera. It surprises me, and makes for a real
inconsistency in food quality and in recipe reliability. Maybe it's just me
though.

Cindi



--
-Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
http://web.mac.com/barbschaller - blahblahblog -
1/11/2007,Pork Tenderloin and Oven Roasted Potatoes
http://jamlady.eboard.com
http://www.caringbridge.org/visit/amytaylor



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Old 16-01-2007, 01:29 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Melondy Hill wrote:
Mr Libido Incognito wrote:
Sheldon wrote on 15 Jan 2007 in rec.food.cooking


But you're talking about utilizing two different cooking methods, as
many recipes do.

You heard of Shake N' Bake... well you're doing Sear N' Bake

Frying simply means cooking in fat... only parameters to consider for
choosing a cooking temperature are type of food and smoke point, which
is a very narrow range, all frying is done somewhere between
350F-400F, with the majority occuring at/near 375F. You really
don't have much of a choice regarding frying temperatures... most all
frying is done within a ten degree range. Experineced cooks don't
measure fryiing temperature, they observe cooking results and
interpolate, something only experience can impart.

I don't think you really have any question... you're merely
illustrating that you're confused... did you have too much gin last
night... I'm giving you the benefit of any doubt so don't get
emotional, eh.

Sheldon



Thanks for that sheldon, that proves it isn't the way I wrote the question
that was the problem. But instead the way you interperted it. Still
awaiting an answer...


If a long time lurker can come out and play, may I try to answer your
question?

The types of frying I know of are Deep fat frying, Pan frying, Saute,
and stir frying. I guess you could place searing in there, too, under
the umbrella of "pan frying".

Deep fat frying is when you submerge it under the fat and it's cooked at
usually higher temperatures. Not all cooking in deep fat is frying as
you can poach in deep fat, too.

Pan frying is done at moderate to high temp, more oil than a saute. You
are trying to FRY the food without having to submerge it. You also are
trying to get thick fond on the bottom of your pan.

Saute is when you cook something in little fat and keep it moving around
the pan with lots of room all around. The pan is fairly empty. The heat
is usually high moderate to high. You are trying to sear the outside of
the food quickly. You get less fond because the food is so briefly left
in the pan.

Stir frying is always very high heat. Fat amount is whatever you need to
use or is appropriate to the dish. The food is stirred or moved around
the pan but usually only after an initial browning sear. You can have
lots of food in the pan during stir frying as opposed to saute.

This is how I have always understood the terms. It's more a definition
of temperature and method than amount of fat in the pan. I've noticed
however, in the last few years how correct terms have disappeared from
recipes in books, magazines, Internet and tv show recipes. Now they just
say what size pan or pot and use the distinct term "cook" the food. I
guess it's a total dumbdown for the newbie cooks but sure isn't very
exact or educational.

Hope you don't mind my butting in for a minute or two.


I don't mind anyone butting in only you don't know what you're talking
about... all frying is cooking in fat within a very narrow temperature
range... defining frying by the type of vessel used is just plain
ignorant.



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Old 16-01-2007, 01:55 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Melba's Jammin' wrote:
Melondy wrote:

This is how I have always understood the terms. It's more a definition
of temperature and method than amount of fat in the pan. I've noticed
however, in the last few years how correct terms have disappeared from
recipes in books, magazines, Internet and tv show recipes. Now they just
say what size pan or pot and use the distinct term "cook" the food. I
guess it's a total dumbdown for the newbie cooks but sure isn't very
exact or educational.

Hope you don't mind my butting in for a minute or two.

Melondy


It is exactly a total dumbdown for inexperienced cooks. I had an
interesting conversation about it with the former editor of the local
rag's food section. I hadn't noticed it (because I don't read cookbooks
the way she still does) but she pointed out how method instructions have
changed. "They don't teach how to cream butter and sugar in Home Ec
classes any more. If you can find a Home Ec class."


What dumbdown... most cookbooks are dumb, always have been, always will
be... anyone can write a cookbook, even those who don't cook, which is
why there are so darned many produced. And there are no more Home Ec
classes because they were sexist... I'm suprised at you.

I like your explanations, Melondy.


Her explanations are stupid, all of them.

Thanks for coming forth. Since you
have, I'm curious about something. You can email me if you wish. Why
do you lurk and not post? What do you get from the group? No insults
or anything -- just curiosity. Thanks. :-)


It's obvious to me why she lurks, same reason all lurkers lurk,
cowardice.

Sheldon

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Old 16-01-2007, 01:55 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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In article ,
jay wrote:

On Mon, 15 Jan 2007 17:54:48 -0600, Melba's Jammin' wrote:

-Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ


I have hesitated to ask trying not to continue to be a catfish/mackerel of
sorts.....but what is a HOSSSPoJ?

jay


LOL. The Holy Order of the Sacred Sisters of St. Pectina of Jella.
--
-Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
http://web.mac.com/barbschaller - blahblahblog -
1/11/2007,Pork Tenderloin and Oven Roasted Potatoes
http://jamlady.eboard.com
http://www.caringbridge.org/visit/amytaylor
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Old 16-01-2007, 02:16 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Melba's Jammin' wrote:
In article ,
jay wrote:

On Mon, 15 Jan 2007 17:54:48 -0600, Melba's Jammin' wrote:

-Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ


I have hesitated to ask trying not to continue to be a catfish/mackerel of
sorts.....but what is a HOSSSPoJ?

jay


LOL. The Holy Order of the Sacred Sisters of St. Pectina of Jella.


If you're going to use that last lower case P"o"J then
you need to be consistant. "THOotSSoSPoJ"

Sheldon

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Old 16-01-2007, 02:41 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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In article .com,
"Sheldon" wrote:
why there are so darned many produced. And there are no more Home Ec
classes because they were sexist... I'm suprised at you.


Sheldon


Must've been the school I went to in the late 50's -- the guys had to
have at least a quarter (it was the quarter system then) and the girls
had to have at least a quarter of shop. I still have my letter holder
from that class.
--
-Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
http://web.mac.com/barbschaller - blahblahblog -
1/11/2007,Pork Tenderloin and Oven Roasted Potatoes
http://jamlady.eboard.com
http://www.caringbridge.org/visit/amytaylor
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Old 16-01-2007, 02:42 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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In article .com,
"Sheldon" wrote:

Melba's Jammin' wrote:
In article ,
jay wrote:

On Mon, 15 Jan 2007 17:54:48 -0600, Melba's Jammin' wrote:

-Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ

I have hesitated to ask trying not to continue to be a catfish/mackerel of
sorts.....but what is a HOSSSPoJ?

jay


LOL. The Holy Order of the Sacred Sisters of St. Pectina of Jella.


If you're going to use that last lower case P"o"J then
you need to be consistant. "THOotSSoSPoJ"

Sheldon


And you need to learn to spell. Bite me. LOL!
--
-Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
http://web.mac.com/barbschaller - blahblahblog -
1/11/2007,Pork Tenderloin and Oven Roasted Potatoes
http://jamlady.eboard.com
http://www.caringbridge.org/visit/amytaylor


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