Baking (rec.food.baking) For bakers, would-be bakers, and fans and consumers of breads, pastries, cakes, pies, cookies, crackers, bagels, and other items commonly found in a bakery. Includes all methods of preparation, both conventional and not.

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Old 19-06-2005, 11:14 PM
 
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Default need bread mixer, small institutional size

My 20-year-old bread mixer has just died and I need advice on how to
find a replacement. Mfr. no longer exists. It is a 20 qt. pot with
motor clamped on top & dough mixer blade, split phase motor, 1/8 hp. It
mixes 10-12 loaves at a time. All I find in a search are for prof.
bakeries, and home use ones are too small. I'm open to other options.
Thanks, Jan


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Old 20-06-2005, 06:48 AM
Roy
 
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My 20-year-old bread mixer has just died and I need advice on how to
find a replacement. Mfr. no longer exists. It is a 20 qt. pot with
motor clamped on top & dough mixer blade, split phase motor, 1/8 hp. It
mixes 10-12 loaves at a time. All I find in a search are for prof.
bakeries, and home use ones are too small. I'm open to other options



First you let go your sentimentalism.....Your old mixer is gone...
Repairing an old and extinct mixer may cost you a lot of money that
can be better invested on a new equipment.
..Sell it to the junk shop or bury in your yard.....Put a fittting
epitaph.....g
Now
You are looking for a 20 quart size mixer than is suited for
breadmaking?....There are many second hand mixers as well as brand new
ones of that genre......you just have to look for it. in bakery trade
journals ...etc., classified adds .for bakery equipments...
You may have to procure a different machine with a better performance
than your "dead" one.
Say a different mixing mechanism.... not specifically a planetary type
as that is not the best for bread making; rather such as a spiral
mixer, reciprocating Artofex type, .fork type French mixer , Z--blade
mixer etc.....even the magic mill if they have the size capacity that
you desire.. take your pick.....
Roy

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Old 20-06-2005, 09:02 PM
[email protected]
 
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Default



Roy wrote:
My 20-year-old bread mixer has just died and I need advice on how to
find a replacement. Mfr. no longer exists. It is a 20 qt. pot with
motor clamped on top & dough mixer blade, split phase motor, 1/8 hp. It
mixes 10-12 loaves at a time. All I find in a search are for prof.
bakeries, and home use ones are too small. I'm open to other options



First you let go your sentimentalism.....Your old mixer is gone...
Repairing an old and extinct mixer may cost you a lot of money that
can be better invested on a new equipment.
.Sell it to the junk shop or bury in your yard.....Put a fittting
epitaph.....g
Now
You are looking for a 20 quart size mixer than is suited for
breadmaking?....There are many second hand mixers as well as brand new
ones of that genre......you just have to look for it. in bakery trade
journals ...etc., classified adds .for bakery equipments...
You may have to procure a different machine with a better performance
than your "dead" one.
Say a different mixing mechanism.... not specifically a planetary type
as that is not the best for bread making; rather such as a spiral
mixer, reciprocating Artofex type, .fork type French mixer , Z--blade
mixer etc.....even the magic mill if they have the size capacity that
you desire.. take your pick.....
Roy


Roy, I agree that in this case repair is unlikely. A welding repair was
done about 10 years ago, but w/co. out of business for years, enough is
enough.

Secondhand's fine. And I don't object to something totally different,
as long as the size is appropriate, results are the same, and cost is
moderate. Thanks for the suggestions--I'll re-search.

Jan

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Old 21-06-2005, 01:40 AM
[email protected]
 
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Kenneth wrote:
On 20 Jun 2005 12:34:30 -0700, wrote:



Kenneth wrote:
On 19 Jun 2005 15:14:54 -0700,
wrote:

My 20-year-old bread mixer has just died and I need advice on how to
find a replacement. Mfr. no longer exists. It is a 20 qt. pot with
motor clamped on top & dough mixer blade, split phase motor, 1/8 hp. It
mixes 10-12 loaves at a time. All I find in a search are for prof.
bakeries, and home use ones are too small. I'm open to other options.
Thanks, Jan

Howdy,

Depending on what broke, it might be possible to get it
repaired even though the manufacturer is no longer
available.

What went wrong...?

All the best,
--
Kenneth

If you email... Please remove the "SPAMLESS."


Repair is unlikely, although I'm checking. A gear has broken on the
shaft connecting the motor to the dough hook, so the shaft rotates and
pops out. Mfr. was Country Engineering in Wisconsin and they've been
gone for years. Cost 20+ years ago was $264 as it had demo'ed at
Organic Gardening kitchens. Probably made 2500-3000 loaves mostly for
family use.

Thanks, Jan


Hi again Jan,

It is most unlikely that the broken gear was unique to that
mixer. With your description of the problem I would suggest
that a repair is even more likely.

Good luck with it,
--
Kenneth

If you email... Please remove the "SPAMLESS."



Since your original mixer was a 20 qt you should stay with that size.

That leaves out most of the heavy duty kitchen mixers that I know of.
Most at 5 qt or less.

A Hobart mixer with paddle and dough hook may meet your requirements
but tend to be expensive even secondhand.

Thunderbird do a very similar mixer at about $1600 new.

Try
www.bakeryequipment.com. The site needs Internet explorer for the
menus to work properly.

You could also try ebay.

A repair seems like an option if you can find someone handy to size the
gear. If it needs to be made for you forget it.



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Old 21-06-2005, 12:12 PM
Ida Slapter
 
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Default

On 20 Jun 2005 17:40:58 -0700, wrote:

Since your original mixer was a 20 qt you should stay with that size.

That leaves out most of the heavy duty kitchen mixers that I know of.
Most at 5 qt or less.


There are a dozen or more on eBay

http://search.ebay.com/20-quart-mixe...jsZ1QQfromZR40





The Fine Art of Cooking involves personal choice.
Many preferences, ingredients, and procedures may not
be consistent with what you know to be true.
As with any recipe, you may find your personal
intervention will be necessary. Bon Appetit!
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Old 13-03-2015, 01:08 AM posted to rec.food.baking
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Join Date: Mar 2015
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Default need bread mixer, small institutional size

On Sunday, June 19, 2005 at 4:14:54 PM UTC-6, wrote:
My 20-year-old bread mixer has just died and I need advice on how to
find a replacement. Mfr. no longer exists. It is a 20 qt. pot with
motor clamped on top & dough mixer blade, split phase motor, 1/8 hp. It
mixes 10-12 loaves at a time. All I find in a search are for prof.
bakeries, and home use ones are too small. I'm open to other options.
Thanks, Jan


I doubt it's still relevant, but I'm the son of the owner of Country Engineering, and while the company is long out of business, I'd be happy to see if I could find the original source for the parts you need. If nothing else, I'd love to actually own one of the mixers my dad made, as I was 10 years old when the rising price of the motors and pots drove him out of business.

Jeff

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Old 13-03-2015, 03:44 AM posted to rec.food.baking
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Default need bread mixer, small institutional size

replying to J.Bittner , Jeff Naujok wrote:
Too bad I never saw this at the time.

I am the son of the owner of Country Engineering. Although I'm not sure if I
could help out much, I could probably have found you the parts you needed, or
at least found out where my dad had sourced them from.

In case anyone else ever hits this discussion, hopefully I'll get pinged, and
offer what help I can.

Jeff


Roy wrote:
My 20-year-old bread mixer has just died and I need advice on

how to
find a replacement. Mfr. no longer exists. It is a 20 qt. pot

with
motor clamped on top & dough mixer blade, split phase

motor, 1/8 hp. It
mixes 10-12 loaves at a time. All I find in a search are for

prof.
bakeries, and home use ones are too small. I'm open to other

options




--




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