Baking (rec.food.baking) For bakers, would-be bakers, and fans and consumers of breads, pastries, cakes, pies, cookies, crackers, bagels, and other items commonly found in a bakery. Includes all methods of preparation, both conventional and not.

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Old 30-12-2003, 11:25 AM
Matthew
 
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Default Yeast for breadmaker

[I am in the UK]
I have recently purchased a (cheap!) breadmaker, and have made my
first two
loaves.

The recipe book specifies 1/2 tsp of yeast to 450 grams flour, while
the yeast I purchased, Hovis Fast Action (six sachets for an
extortionate 89p) says one sachet (7 grams - about 2 tsp) for 750
grams of flour. I decided to follow the yeast and put in most of a
packet.

Unfortunately the dough rose much too much. The result was reasonably
tasty, but definitely too much yeast.

So for my second loaf I decided to follow the recipe book strictly,
and put in 1/2 tsp of yeast.

This one rose hardly at all.

Given the massive discrepancy can anyone suggest a yeast to use - the
sachets are wasteful given that they are designed for 2/3 more flour,
not too mention that they seem to have different (less!) raising power
per tsp than the yeast specified.

My supermarkets (Sainsburys, Tesco or Asda) sell only these sachets or
yeast which must be mixed with water and described as *not* suitable
for use in breadmakers.

Ocado (Waitrose) sell Dove Farm Quick Yeast (125grams) for 89p, which
I guess will be better. It is also available here at
http://www.alexander-essentials.com/...ick-yeast.php3

But even they specify 1tsp (twice as much as my bread machine) of
yeast. So is this a different kind of yeast again, or is yeast that
flexible that you can halve the quantities with the same effect?

And does anyone know where on the high street I can buy a tub of
suitable dried yeast?

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Old 30-12-2003, 12:52 PM
Mel
 
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Default Yeast for breadmaker

I've always used the Allinson's sachets and use 1.5 teaspoons per 750g
loaf. I tried the Dove's yeast but didn't get on with it too well as it
either didn't rise enough, or when I added more yeast the bread tasted too
yeasty. My local Coop has just started stocking big packets of Allinson's
yeast (the same kind as in the sachets) and it's much more convenient than
using the sachets and works well in my machine.
I find when using the Hovis fast action yeast that it works better on the
quick program on my machine than it does on the full length one, but I do
need to add a full sachet of it each time.
If you can only get the sachets, they do keep ok in the fridge if you put
some sort of clip on the top (I use a peg). You can then finsih off the
sachet the next day.
How much salt and sugar are you adding to your loaf? If you are using too
much sugar then the bread could rise too much and the same could happen if
you don't use enough salt.
All bread machines are different though and it's case of trial and error
when you buy a new one. Just keep varying the quantities of everything until
you get a loaf you like.
Mel.


"Matthew" wrote in message
om...
[I am in the UK]
I have recently purchased a (cheap!) breadmaker, and have made my
first two
loaves.

The recipe book specifies 1/2 tsp of yeast to 450 grams flour, while
the yeast I purchased, Hovis Fast Action (six sachets for an
extortionate 89p) says one sachet (7 grams - about 2 tsp) for 750
grams of flour. I decided to follow the yeast and put in most of a
packet.

Unfortunately the dough rose much too much. The result was reasonably
tasty, but definitely too much yeast.

So for my second loaf I decided to follow the recipe book strictly,
and put in 1/2 tsp of yeast.

This one rose hardly at all.

Given the massive discrepancy can anyone suggest a yeast to use - the
sachets are wasteful given that they are designed for 2/3 more flour,
not too mention that they seem to have different (less!) raising power
per tsp than the yeast specified.

My supermarkets (Sainsburys, Tesco or Asda) sell only these sachets or
yeast which must be mixed with water and described as *not* suitable
for use in breadmakers.

Ocado (Waitrose) sell Dove Farm Quick Yeast (125grams) for 89p, which
I guess will be better. It is also available here at
http://www.alexander-essentials.com/...ick-yeast.php3

But even they specify 1tsp (twice as much as my bread machine) of
yeast. So is this a different kind of yeast again, or is yeast that
flexible that you can halve the quantities with the same effect?

And does anyone know where on the high street I can buy a tub of
suitable dried yeast?



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Old 30-12-2003, 03:46 PM
Nick Pitfield
 
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Default Yeast for breadmaker

"Mel" wrote in
:

I've always used the Allinson's sachets and use 1.5 teaspoons per
750g
loaf. I tried the Dove's yeast but didn't get on with it too well as
it either didn't rise enough, or when I added more yeast the bread
tasted too yeasty. My local Coop has just started stocking big packets


I always use the Dove yeast - works fine for me in a panny bread machine. I
use about 1 tablespoon for a 1.5lb loaf. I previously tried the Allinson
sachets and found they didn't rise much.

Just goes to show that other factors such as water hardness, amounts of
salt and sugar etc are just as important.

--

Regards.

Nick Pitfield )
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Old 30-12-2003, 07:37 PM
Adrian Tupper
 
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Default Yeast for breadmaker

"Mel" wrote in
:

I've always used the Allinson's sachets and use 1.5 teaspoons per
750g
loaf. I tried the Dove's yeast but didn't get on with it too well as
it either didn't rise enough, or when I added more yeast the bread
tasted too yeasty.


That's interesting. I find Dove's Farm works better than Allinsons.
Must be the different machine and/or flour. I would use about 2.5
tsp of Dove's Farm yeast for 750g, which is probably what you did.
I don't taste the yeast though.

--
Adrian


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Old 30-12-2003, 11:04 PM
Steph Peters
 
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Default Yeast for breadmaker

(Matthew) of http://groups.google.com wrote:
[I am in the UK]
I have recently purchased a (cheap!) breadmaker, and have made my
first two loaves.

The recipe book specifies 1/2 tsp of yeast to 450 grams flour, while
the yeast I purchased, Hovis Fast Action (six sachets for an
extortionate 89p) says one sachet (7 grams - about 2 tsp) for 750
grams of flour. I decided to follow the yeast and put in most of a
packet.

Unfortunately the dough rose much too much. The result was reasonably
tasty, but definitely too much yeast.

So for my second loaf I decided to follow the recipe book strictly,
and put in 1/2 tsp of yeast.

This one rose hardly at all.


Go on the hunt for big packs of Fermipan yeast. Eighth Day in Manchester, a
local wholefood shop, sells them, 500g for about 2. Bought a pack in
March, gave half to a friend, and I'm still using the other half from the
freezer. Initially I used 1/2 tsp for 400g of white flour, 1 tsp for
granary or wholemeal; as the yeast is now rather elderly I've upped that by
50%.

What flour are you using? To get bread right you need appropriate
proportions of flour, water and yeast. Flours do vary - one brand of white
will need more yeast than another brand. Your lack of rising could be from
other causes - too little water, or I've managed to produce brick like
results by trying to put fresh garlic in.
--
He's DEAD, Jim. Tell the Klingons that dinner is served.
Steph Peters, Manchester, England
email: delete invalid from lid
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Old 31-12-2003, 12:22 AM
June Hughes
 
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Default Yeast for breadmaker

In message , Steph Peters
writes


Go on the hunt for big packs of Fermipan yeast. Eighth Day in Manchester, a
local wholefood shop, sells them, 500g for about 2. Bought a pack in
March, gave half to a friend, and I'm still using the other half from the
freezer. Initially I used 1/2 tsp for 400g of white flour, 1 tsp for
granary or wholemeal; as the yeast is now rather elderly I've upped that by
50%.

I haven't seen that. Shall have a search for it.

PS Wasn't it lovely when you could walk down to the baker's and ask for
fresh yeast? You could freeze it for ages and it still came up trumps.
Pity. That is what the supermarkets have done for us (sadly, - even
Waitrose).
--
June Hughes
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Old 31-12-2003, 12:57 AM
Kev Crocombe
 
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Default Yeast for breadmaker

In article , June Hughes
writes
In message , Steph Peters
writes


Go on the hunt for big packs of Fermipan yeast. Eighth Day in Manchester, a
local wholefood shop, sells them, 500g for about 2. Bought a pack in
March, gave half to a friend, and I'm still using the other half from the
freezer. Initially I used 1/2 tsp for 400g of white flour, 1 tsp for
granary or wholemeal; as the yeast is now rather elderly I've upped that by
50%.

I haven't seen that. Shall have a search for it.

PS Wasn't it lovely when you could walk down to the baker's and ask for
fresh yeast? You could freeze it for ages and it still came up trumps.
Pity. That is what the supermarkets have done for us (sadly, - even
Waitrose).


You can get free fresh yeast at Tescos if you ask - took me a while to
adapt it for the abm though - though it definitely gives a different
result.

On the whole I'm a Fermipan convert too.

--
************************************************** *********************
I am a phagocyte in the the bloodstream of the body politic
************************************************** *********************
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Old 31-12-2003, 01:17 AM
wildeny
 
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Default Yeast for breadmaker

I also think 1/2tsp for 450gram flour is too little. It is possible to
use less yeast if the fermentation is longer. Maybe your recipe book
is not for bread machine.

The amount of yeast used in the recipe varies from brand to brand
slighly. The instruction from the yest manufacturers calls for too
much yeast. One sachet can be used for nearly 2lb flour. Besides, one
sachet is about 2.25 tsp yeast.
How about the recipe from the manual? You can start from that and
adjust it next time.
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Old 02-01-2004, 04:32 PM
Dee Randall
 
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Default Yeast for breadmaker

Sounds like you live in England?
Do they have "instant yeast" as well in the larger packs?
In the US, we have instant yeast in the large packets. I use nothing else
but "instant" yeast in the bread machine, although I use the other "active
dry" in other baking.

One thing about instant yeast is that it doesn't need proofed (put in water)
first; although I don't think your bread machine would call for it to be
proofed. But it 'activates' more quickly. And as it is a finer grain, I
think the measurement may be just a little difference in weight, but who
knows without measuring it.

I use about 1-1/2 teaspoons of instant yeast in my bread machine in all
recipes that call for around 4 cups of flour, and whether or not I add
flakes; oatmeal, barley, or rye.

I always add wet ingredients first, then on the top of my dry ingredients, I
add my yeast. No matter what machine I've used, I don't think I've got more
than .5% failure.

Try these two things first, and I'll bet you're in business.

Dee




"June Hughes" wrote in message
...
In message , Steph Peters
writes


Go on the hunt for big packs of Fermipan yeast. Eighth Day in

Manchester, a
local wholefood shop, sells them, 500g for about 2. Bought a pack in
March, gave half to a friend, and I'm still using the other half from the
freezer. Initially I used 1/2 tsp for 400g of white flour, 1 tsp for
granary or wholemeal; as the yeast is now rather elderly I've upped that

by
50%.

I haven't seen that. Shall have a search for it.

PS Wasn't it lovely when you could walk down to the baker's and ask for
fresh yeast? You could freeze it for ages and it still came up trumps.
Pity. That is what the supermarkets have done for us (sadly, - even
Waitrose).
--
June Hughes





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Old 02-01-2004, 11:58 PM
paula
 
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Default Yeast for breadmaker

I have used Allinsons yeast from a drum in my bread machine and it
works just fine.it doesn't state on the tin --not for use in bread
machines though --just for regular bread making, any way it was fine.
i also get my fresh yeast free from my local asda/Walmart and have
done for yonks.sometimes i only get a piece about 1/2 ounce to 1 ounce
in weight, other times i get about 3 ounces depending on who serves me
so i freeze what i am not going to use within two days for later use.
By the way the baker said that it does not freeze BUT i have been
freezing yeast since before he was born!!!!!.any way back to bread
machines-do you all prefer bread machine bread to the good old
fashioned hand made stuff.as one of my girls has my machine at the
moment i am now making it by hand and i must say my old man( and me
)much prefer it, And it doesn't take too long to make even with two
provings.


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