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General Cooking (rec.food.cooking) For general food and cooking discussion. Foods of all kinds, food procurement, cooking methods and techniques, eating, etc.

How many layers is your lasagna?



 
 
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  #1 (permalink)  
Old 12-10-2009, 07:00 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 4,469
Default How many layers is your lasagna?

Mine is (starting at the bottom): tomato sauce, noodles, ricotta,
noodles, meat, just a little sauce, noodles, ricotta, noodles, sauce.
Bake for about 45 minutes, top with grated mozzarella cheese mixed with
a little oregano, and bake for 5 to 10 more minutes.

It's good, but it tries to climb out of the pan during cooking. And
when serving, it separates at the meat layer and the top slides off. So
is there a better way to stack it? I think I have too many thin layers.
And maybe the meat should be near the top instead of the middle.

Bob
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  #2 (permalink)  
Old 12-10-2009, 07:16 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 842
Default How many layers is your lasagna?

On Oct 12, 2:00�am, zxcvbob wrote:
Mine is (starting at the bottom): tomato sauce, noodles, ricotta,
noodles, meat, just a little sauce, noodles, ricotta, noodles, sauce.
Bake for about 45 minutes, top with grated mozzarella cheese mixed with
a little oregano, and bake for 5 to 10 more minutes.

It's good, but it tries to climb out of the pan during cooking. �And
when serving, it separates at the meat layer and the top slides off. �So
is there a better way to stack it? �I think I have too many thin layers.
� And maybe the meat should be near the top instead of the middle..

Bob



I usually go noodles, ricotta mixture, cheese, meat sauce. Repeat
twice. I save out a little cheese to go on top. I don't like putting
to much cheese on top because then it forms a tough skin and it makes
it hard to cut. However, if you don't put any cheese on top it dries
out before it's completely done.
  #3 (permalink)  
Old 12-10-2009, 01:16 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 666
Default How many layers is your lasagna?

Wayne Boatwright wrote:

Maybe you need a deeper pan, Bob. My lasagne pan is 4" deep. I have
4 layers of noodles, along with variious layers of cheese, sauce, and
meat. I alternate directions when layering the lasagne noodles.


A very good advice that I forgot to mention.
--
Vilco
Mai guardare Trailer park Boys senza
qualcosa da bere a portata di mano



  #4 (permalink)  
Old 12-10-2009, 01:19 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 666
Default How many layers is your lasagna?

zxcvbob wrote:

Mine is (starting at the bottom): tomato sauce, noodles, ricotta,
noodles, meat, just a little sauce, noodles, ricotta, noodles, sauce.
Bake for about 45 minutes, top with grated mozzarella cheese mixed
with a little oregano, and bake for 5 to 10 more minutes.

It's good, but it tries to climb out of the pan during cooking. And
when serving, it separates at the meat layer and the top slides off. So is
there a better way to stack it? I think I have too many thin
layers. And maybe the meat should be near the top instead of the
middle.


4 to 6 layers are a good guideline.
For the "separating at the meat layer" issue, I don't experience that
because I make every layer with noodle, add the bechamel, add ragu' and andd
parmesan. All the layers are the same. Maybe the dry grated parmesan helps
keeping it all in place?
--
Vilco
Mai guardare Trailer park Boys senza
qualcosa da bere a portata di mano



  #5 (permalink)  
Old 12-10-2009, 02:57 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 5,847
Default How many layers is your lasagna?


zxcvbob wrote:

Mine is (starting at the bottom): tomato sauce, noodles, ricotta,
noodles, meat, just a little sauce, noodles, ricotta, noodles, sauce.
Bake for about 45 minutes, top with grated mozzarella cheese mixed with
a little oregano, and bake for 5 to 10 more minutes.

It's good, but it tries to climb out of the pan during cooking. And
when serving, it separates at the meat layer and the top slides off. So
is there a better way to stack it? I think I have too many thin layers.
And maybe the meat should be near the top instead of the middle.

Bob


Using thin full sized sheets of fresh made pasta pretty much eliminates
sliding issues unless you seriously over-sauce. The fresh thin pasta
conforms to the surface textures unlike thick stiff individual strips,
and absorbs more liquid so it sticks much better. I don't think the
layer count matters much unless you are trying to out-layer someone. My
lasagna tends to run about 4 layers.
  #6 (permalink)  
Old 12-10-2009, 03:01 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 5,847
Default How many layers is your lasagna?


zxcvbob wrote:

Mine is (starting at the bottom): tomato sauce, noodles, ricotta,
noodles, meat, just a little sauce, noodles, ricotta, noodles, sauce.
Bake for about 45 minutes, top with grated mozzarella cheese mixed with
a little oregano, and bake for 5 to 10 more minutes.

It's good, but it tries to climb out of the pan during cooking. And
when serving, it separates at the meat layer and the top slides off. So
is there a better way to stack it? I think I have too many thin layers.
And maybe the meat should be near the top instead of the middle.

Bob


Using thin full sized sheets of fresh made pasta pretty much eliminates
sliding issues unless you seriously over-sauce. The fresh thin pasta
conforms to the surface textures unlike thick stiff individual strips,
and absorbs more liquid so it sticks much better. I don't think the
layer count matters much unless you are trying to out-layer someone. My
lasagna tends to run about 4 layers.
  #7 (permalink)  
Old 12-10-2009, 04:01 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 4,469
Default How many layers is your lasagna?

Pete C. wrote:
zxcvbob wrote:
Mine is (starting at the bottom): tomato sauce, noodles, ricotta,
noodles, meat, just a little sauce, noodles, ricotta, noodles, sauce.
Bake for about 45 minutes, top with grated mozzarella cheese mixed with
a little oregano, and bake for 5 to 10 more minutes.

It's good, but it tries to climb out of the pan during cooking. And
when serving, it separates at the meat layer and the top slides off. So
is there a better way to stack it? I think I have too many thin layers.
And maybe the meat should be near the top instead of the middle.

Bob


Using thin full sized sheets of fresh made pasta pretty much eliminates
sliding issues unless you seriously over-sauce. The fresh thin pasta
conforms to the surface textures unlike thick stiff individual strips,
and absorbs more liquid so it sticks much better. I don't think the
layer count matters much unless you are trying to out-layer someone. My
lasagna tends to run about 4 layers.



I'm using a 10x15x2" pan, I think that's the problem. I'm stacking
until I use up a whole pound of cooked dried noodles (minus one for
the dog) and they end up heaped-up in the pan. A 3" or 4" high pan
would help tremendously. I don't think I'll go with the fresh pasta
for lasagna to take to a church potluck, but I might try it once to
see what a difference it makes.

I might replace the 2nd layer of noodles with a layer of sliced
provolone cheese next time to stick it together.

Bob
  #8 (permalink)  
Old 12-10-2009, 04:09 PM
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Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 5
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete C. View Post
zxcvbob wrote:

Mine is (starting at the bottom): tomato sauce, noodles, ricotta,
noodles, meat, just a little sauce, noodles, ricotta, noodles, sauce.
Bake for about 45 minutes, top with grated mozzarella cheese mixed with
a little oregano, and bake for 5 to 10 more minutes.

It's good, but it tries to climb out of the pan during cooking. And
when serving, it separates at the meat layer and the top slides off. So
is there a better way to stack it? I think I have too many thin layers.
And maybe the meat should be near the top instead of the middle.

Bob


Using thin full sized sheets of fresh made pasta pretty much eliminates
sliding issues unless you seriously over-sauce. The fresh thin pasta
conforms to the surface textures unlike thick stiff individual strips,
and absorbs more liquid so it sticks much better. I don't think the
layer count matters much unless you are trying to out-layer someone. My
lasagna tends to run about 4 layers.
Mine is just like everyone elses except I use 3 layers. recipes4freeforum - Index God is good
  #9 (permalink)  
Old 12-10-2009, 04:17 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 666
Default How many layers is your lasagna?

zxcvbob wrote:

I'm using a 10x15x2" pan, I think that's the problem.


Probably yes, the pans I use all have about 4" border.
--
Vilco
Mai guardare Trailer park Boys senza
qualcosa da bere a portata di mano



  #10 (permalink)  
Old 12-10-2009, 04:30 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 11,870
Default How many layers is your lasagna?

In article
,
" wrote:

I usually go noodles, ricotta mixture, cheese, meat sauce. Repeat
twice. I save out a little cheese to go on top. I don't like putting
to much cheese on top because then it forms a tough skin and it makes
it hard to cut. However, if you don't put any cheese on top it dries
out before it's completely done.


Covering it while it's baking should prevent that, I think. And
covering it while it rests for 15-20 minutes before cutting should keep
the top cheese layer moist, too. JMO.
--
-Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
http://web.me.com/barbschaller - Yes, I Can! blog - check
it out. And check this, too: http://www.kare11.com/news/
newsatfour/newsatfour_article.aspx?storyid=823232&catid=323
  #11 (permalink)  
Old 12-10-2009, 05:54 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 708
Default How many layers is your lasagna?

On Oct 12, 10:30*am, Melba's Jammin'
wrote:
In article
,

" wrote:
I usually go noodles, ricotta mixture, cheese, meat sauce. *Repeat
twice. *I save out a little cheese to go on top. *I don't like putting
to much cheese on top because then it forms a tough skin and it makes
it hard to cut. *However, if you don't put any cheese on top it dries
out before it's completely done.


Covering it while it's baking should prevent that, I think. *And
covering it while it rests for 15-20 minutes before cutting should keep
the top cheese layer moist, too. *JMO.
--
-Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJhttp://web.me.com/barbschaller- Yes, I Can! blog - check
it out. *And check this, too: http://www.kare11.com/news/
newsatfour/newsatfour_article.aspx?storyid=823232&catid=323


Yup on the covering.
LiF
  #12 (permalink)  
Old 12-10-2009, 05:56 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 10,676
Default How many layers is your lasagna?

On Mon, 12 Oct 2009 15:17:22 GMT, "ViLco" wrote:

zxcvbob wrote:

I'm using a 10x15x2" pan, I think that's the problem.


Probably yes, the pans I use all have about 4" border.



What is a 4" border on a pan?
  #13 (permalink)  
Old 12-10-2009, 06:06 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 10,676
Default How many layers is your lasagna?

On Mon, 12 Oct 2009 10:30:02 -0500, Melba's Jammin'
wrote:

In article
,
" wrote:

I usually go noodles, ricotta mixture, cheese, meat sauce. Repeat
twice. I save out a little cheese to go on top. I don't like putting
to much cheese on top because then it forms a tough skin and it makes
it hard to cut. However, if you don't put any cheese on top it dries
out before it's completely done.


Covering it while it's baking should prevent that, I think. And
covering it while it rests for 15-20 minutes before cutting should keep
the top cheese layer moist, too. JMO.


I find covering lasagna turns it into braised pasta pudding. It helps
to keep from drying when baking at a lower temperature... I find 300F
more than adequate for pasta caseroles... after all everything should
be fully cooked and it only needs heating through and enough time to
melt the cheese. And lasagna is supposed to be slightly crusty on
top.
  #14 (permalink)  
Old 12-10-2009, 06:52 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 4,469
Default How many layers is your lasagna?

brooklyn1 wrote:
On Mon, 12 Oct 2009 10:30:02 -0500, Melba's Jammin'
wrote:

In article
,
" wrote:

I usually go noodles, ricotta mixture, cheese, meat sauce. Repeat
twice. I save out a little cheese to go on top. I don't like putting
to much cheese on top because then it forms a tough skin and it makes
it hard to cut. However, if you don't put any cheese on top it dries
out before it's completely done.

Covering it while it's baking should prevent that, I think. And
covering it while it rests for 15-20 minutes before cutting should keep
the top cheese layer moist, too. JMO.


I find covering lasagna turns it into braised pasta pudding. It helps
to keep from drying when baking at a lower temperature... I find 300F
more than adequate for pasta caseroles... after all everything should
be fully cooked and it only needs heating through and enough time to
melt the cheese. And lasagna is supposed to be slightly crusty on
top.



I've started cooking it uncovered, so I can wrap it in foil afterwards
and not have the foil stick to the top. My lasagna has raw eggs in
it, so it's best to heat it all the way thru (I use 300F) even tho'
most of it is precooked.

I do cover with foil when I have to reheat the whole thing, but if I'm
planning on doing that, I don't put the cheese on top until the end of
reheating.

One of these days I'm gonna remember to try assembling it all the day
before and refrigerate without cooking. Take it to church "raw" and
bake it the day of. (The lasagna is so big, I only make it for
potlucks and then bring maybe a third of it home for us to have
leftovers.)

The one this weekend wasn't dry. I cooked the noodles a little more
than usual (soft rather than /al dente/) so they didn't suck up all
the moisture. They weren't soggy either.

Bob
  #15 (permalink)  
Old 12-10-2009, 07:26 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Posts: 842
Default How many layers is your lasagna?

On Oct 12, 8:07�am, Sqwertz wrote:
On Sun, 11 Oct 2009 23:16:12 -0700 (PDT), wrote:
I usually go noodles, ricotta mixture, cheese, meat sauce. �Repeat
twice. �


You are correct :-)

I save out a little cheese to go on top. �I don't like putting
to much cheese on top because then it forms a tough skin and it makes
it hard to cut.


As he first mentioned, don't put the last layer of cheese on until
the last few minutes. �Problem solved.

However, if you don't put any cheese on top it dries
out before it's completely done.


Foil.

-sw


I like the cheese to be slightly browned though. If you put it on for
just the last few minutes it remains pale looking. For the same
reason I don't use foil, unless the lasagna has been refrigerated
before being baked. If that's the case I leave the foil on for the
first 30 minutes of baking and then take the foil off to allow the
cheese to brown.
 




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