Tea (rec.drink.tea) Discussion relating to tea, the world's second most consumed beverage (after water), made by infusing or boiling the leaves of the tea plant (C. sinensis or close relatives) in water.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 23-06-2005, 03:25 PM
Peter Clifford
 
Posts: n/a
Default PG Tips tra

Most of the tea I drink is from bags. I wanted to try PG Tips and
bought a box. The first thing I noticed was that the bags didn't have
a string on them. I usually remove the bags from the cup in 5 or 6
minutes. Am I susposed to leave the PG Tips bags in the cup or fish
them out?

Thank you kindly,

  #2 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 23-06-2005, 03:46 PM
Space Cowboy
 
Posts: n/a
Default

I can't remember if those are the flow-through pyramid bags or the disc
shape. From an English point of view they are meant for teapots and
not individual cup. You'll have to go fishing. They'll bobble on the
top initially and you can risk your fingers but a spoon after six
minutes to dig them from the bottom. That better be a big cup or lots
of cream and sugar.

Jim

Peter Clifford wrote:
Most of the tea I drink is from bags. I wanted to try PG Tips and
bought a box. The first thing I noticed was that the bags didn't have
a string on them. I usually remove the bags from the cup in 5 or 6
minutes. Am I susposed to leave the PG Tips bags in the cup or fish
them out?

Thank you kindly,


  #3 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 23-06-2005, 04:45 PM
Peter Clifford
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On 23 Jun 2005 07:46:25 -0700, "Space Cowboy"
wrote:

I can't remember if those are the flow-through pyramid bags or the disc


These are the flow-through.
That better be a big cup or lots


I use a 12 oz mug.

Thanks for the reply

  #4 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 23-06-2005, 05:32 PM
Scott Dorsey
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article ,
Peter Clifford wrote:
Most of the tea I drink is from bags. I wanted to try PG Tips and
bought a box. The first thing I noticed was that the bags didn't have
a string on them. I usually remove the bags from the cup in 5 or 6
minutes. Am I susposed to leave the PG Tips bags in the cup or fish
them out?


Fish it out! That's what your teaspoon is for. If you keep letting a
bag tea steep, it will get progressively more tannic. At some point it
will get very nasty.

I used to work with an Indian professor who would mix milk and water,
put it in a tea bag, and put it into the microwave. The end result was
kind of scary, actually.
--scott
--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
  #5 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 24-06-2005, 08:01 AM
Dieter Folz
 
Posts: n/a
Default



Peter Clifford schrieb:
Most of the tea I drink is from bags. I wanted to try PG Tips and
bought a box. The first thing I noticed was that the bags didn't have
a string on them. I usually remove the bags from the cup in 5 or 6
minutes. Am I susposed to leave the PG Tips bags in the cup or fish
them out?

Thank you kindly,



Real English tea bags don't come with a string. It's because of the
English way to prepare tea, which is either as a cuppa in a mug (stir &
stab for 30 seconds, squeeze and remove the bag) or in a pot (just
leave bags in it).

Maybe this helps:
http://www.fatsquirrel.org/veghead/wot/vetea.html

Maybe you like also a look at this:
http://leo.huan.co.uk/skills/tea.asp


Dieter



  #6 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 24-06-2005, 02:10 PM
Rob
 
Posts: n/a
Default

As others have already pointed out, you will get better results if you
use a teapot for PG Tips Pyramid bags. If you really want to brew
your tea in a mug, make it a large one because this tea can be quite
strong. You can also buy a "tea bag squeezer", which is basically a
small set of tongs, for removing tagless tea bags from your mug, It's
less messy than a spoon because you can squeeze out all the excess
water, and you can also grab a hold of the bag. With a spoon, the bag
can slide off and fall back into your tea.

PG Tips is also available in string and tag style double-chamber bags,
which are specifically designed for brewing in the mug. This is your
basic Lipton-style tea bag. They are called PG Tips One Cup. They
are a little more expensive than the pyramid bags and a little harder
to find, but are available online from the British Express at
www.britishexpress.com.

  #7 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 24-06-2005, 04:50 PM
Lewis Perin
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"Dieter Folz" writes:

[...]

Maybe you like also a look at this:
http://leo.huan.co.uk/skills/tea.asp


I did look, and I saw

PG Tips tea is picked by pipe smoking monkeys wearing outsize
sunglasses

Startling information indeed, but it left me hungry for details.
Anyone know where the monkeys work? Are there photos?

/Lew
---
Lew Perin /
http://www.panix.com/~perin/babelcarp.html
  #8 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 24-06-2005, 07:13 PM
Dieter Folz
 
Posts: n/a
Default



Lewis Perin schrieb:
"Dieter Folz" writes:

[...]

Maybe you like also a look at this:
http://leo.huan.co.uk/skills/tea.asp


I did look, and I saw

PG Tips tea is picked by pipe smoking monkeys wearing outsize
sunglasses

Startling information indeed, but it left me hungry for details.
Anyone know where the monkeys work? Are there photos?

/Lew
---
Lew Perin /
http://www.panix.com/~perin/babelcarp.html



You can look he
http://www.whom.co.uk/squelch/40years_tv.htm
http://www.guinnessworldrecords.com/content_pages/record.asp?recordid=47906
http://www.markmcm2002.verysmooth.co.uk/ads_m-r1.html
http://www.monkeyworld.co.uk/press.php?ArticleID=22

and watch this:
http://www.whirligig2.freeserve.co.uk/tv/pgtips.rm

and of course he
http://www.pgmoments.co.uk/

  #9 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 24-06-2005, 09:57 PM
Lewis Perin
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"Dieter Folz" writes:

Lewis Perin schrieb:
"Dieter Folz" writes:

[...]

Maybe you like also a look at this:
http://leo.huan.co.uk/skills/tea.asp


I did look, and I saw

PG Tips tea is picked by pipe smoking monkeys wearing outsize
sunglasses

Startling information indeed, but it left me hungry for details.
Anyone know where the monkeys work? Are there photos?


You can look he
http://www.whom.co.uk/squelch/40years_tv.htm
http://www.guinnessworldrecords.com/content_pages/record.asp?recordid=47906
http://www.markmcm2002.verysmooth.co.uk/ads_m-r1.html
http://www.monkeyworld.co.uk/press.php?ArticleID=22

and watch this:
http://www.whirligig2.freeserve.co.uk/tv/pgtips.rm

and of course he
http://www.pgmoments.co.uk/


I must say, RFDT could use more scholars of your caliber, Dieter. I
especially loved the piano movers.

/Lew
---
Lew Perin /
http://www.panix.com/~perin/babelcarp.html
  #10 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 25-06-2005, 09:10 PM
Dieter Folz
 
Posts: n/a
Default



Lewis Perin schrieb:

I must say, RFDT could use more scholars of your caliber, Dieter. I



Not my merit. Just stumbled over a linklist on a German Website:
www.pg-tips.de.vu


especially loved the piano movers.


Ja, that's a nice one. But I really like the new spots with the
T-Birds! :-))



  #11 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 28-06-2005, 08:42 PM
Martin Rosenberg
 
Posts: n/a
Default



Dieter Folz schrieb:
.... or in a pot (just leave bags in it).


Hm, that's what is puzzling me. I read the sites you've mentioned
(pg-tips.de.vu and fatsquirrel.org) and I also know the Braman Museum
tea site, where the traditional English way to prepare tea is shown.
All three explain the habit to leave the tea in the pot. Is there a
trick to it? Otherwise I can imagine, you'll have a problem of a too
weak tea at the beginning and a far too strong tea at the end?! Or is
it true, that English teas like PG Tips are "designed" for that kind of
praparation and infuse there full content of armoa completely in the
first minute?
Any suggestions?

Martin

  #12 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 28-06-2005, 10:15 PM
Lewis Perin
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"Martin Rosenberg" writes:

Dieter Folz schrieb:
... or in a pot (just leave bags in it).


Hm, that's what is puzzling me. I read the sites you've mentioned
(pg-tips.de.vu and fatsquirrel.org) and I also know the Braman Museum
tea site, where the traditional English way to prepare tea is shown.
All three explain the habit to leave the tea in the pot. Is there a
trick to it?


I doubt it, settling for something you don't enjoy very much is a
trick.

Otherwise I can imagine, you'll have a problem of a too weak tea at
the beginning and a far too strong tea at the end?! Or is it true,
that English teas like PG Tips are "designed" for that kind of
praparation and infuse there full content of armoa completely in the
first minute?
Any suggestions?


Try pouring off all the tea liquor when it's done.

If you still don't like the taste, try leaf tea rather than teabags.

I think the question here is how much pleasure you expect to get from
the taste and aroma, and how much effort you're willing to exert in
preparing the tea.

/Lew
---
Lew Perin /
http://www.panix.com/~perin/babelcarp.html
  #13 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 29-06-2005, 10:48 AM
Michael Plant
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Lewis 6/28/05

"Martin Rosenberg" writes:

Dieter Folz schrieb:
... or in a pot (just leave bags in it).


Hm, that's what is puzzling me. I read the sites you've mentioned
(pg-tips.de.vu and fatsquirrel.org) and I also know the Braman Museum
tea site, where the traditional English way to prepare tea is shown.
All three explain the habit to leave the tea in the pot. Is there a
trick to it?


I doubt it, settling for something you don't enjoy very much is a
trick.

Otherwise I can imagine, you'll have a problem of a too weak tea at
the beginning and a far too strong tea at the end?! Or is it true,
that English teas like PG Tips are "designed" for that kind of
praparation and infuse there full content of armoa completely in the
first minute?
Any suggestions?


Try pouring off all the tea liquor when it's done.

If you still don't like the taste, try leaf tea rather than teabags.

I think the question here is how much pleasure you expect to get from
the taste and aroma, and how much effort you're willing to exert in
preparing the tea.

/Lew



Hi guys,

Let me chime in here. Awhile back I took some loose-leaf PG Tips and Typhoo
for comparison. I found that because the leaves are CTC -- as opposed to my
usual whole leaf -- my first two or three tries failed as I brewed the tea
much too strong and lost the malty qualities and whatever subtlety the tea
offers. Brewed lighter, I found them quite OK, PG Tips being the more
pleasant of the two. I think they're tricky teas, and I think that steep
length and amount of tea need to be worked out carefully for individual
taste. These are not forgiving teas. That's from my experience. If the
discussion is about decanting, that's an absolute must.

Michael

  #14 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 09-07-2005, 04:49 AM
Rob
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Brewed lighter, I found them quite OK, PG Tips being the more
pleasant of the two. I think they're tricky teas, and I think that
steep
length and amount of tea need to be worked out carefully for individual
taste. These are not forgiving teas. That's from my experience. If the
discussion is about decanting, that's an absolute must.

These teas are designed to be drunk with milk. About 98% of the
British population adds milk to tea, and some of them use quite a bit
of it. You can get away with oversteeping it if you add enough milk
to counteract the tanniin. I take my tea without milk, and I agree
with Michael, decanting is an absolute must with these teas. I strain
into a second pot - or remove the tea bags from the pot - after four
minutes.

I don't think I have ever tried PG Tips loose tea. I have gotten lazy
lately and been using mostly tea bags. I did not like loose Typhoo, as
it was VERY dusty; the bagged version is quite good, though.

I have had more expensive, "better quality" teas than these that I did
not enjoy nearly as much.

  #15 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 26-07-2005, 08:28 PM
Dieter Folz
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Martin Rosenberg schrieb:
Dieter Folz schrieb:
... or in a pot (just leave bags in it).


Hm, that's what is puzzling me. I read the sites you've mentioned
(pg-tips.de.vu and fatsquirrel.org) and I also know the Braman Museum
tea site, where the traditional English way to prepare tea is shown.
All three explain the habit to leave the tea in the pot. Is there a
trick to it? Otherwise I can imagine, you'll have a problem of a too
weak tea at the beginning and a far too strong tea at the end?! Or is
it true, that English teas like PG Tips are "designed" for that kind of
praparation and infuse there full content of armoa completely in the
first minute?
Any suggestions?

Martin



I just bought a new box with PG Tips pyramid bags (the normal ones,
with 3,125g of tea per bag). On the box there is a nice overview of the
PG Tips history, because of their 75th anniversary. While reading this
I noticed the information that to use PG Tips on its best, one should
use one bag per cup. Then I noticed on the bottom a nutrition
information. There they write that this referrs to 170ml with 30ml
semi-skimmed milk (so overall the amount of a normal mug), brewed with
freshly boiled water for 1-2 minutes.

So, now we know, you should use one pyramid bag (3,125g) per mug and
let the tea infuse for 1-2 minutes (which also implies a removal of the
bag/s). That means for a preparation in a pot about three bags (should
equal three heaped tea spoons) for 0,5 liter (as long as you don't want
to add one more bag "for the pot").


Dieter



Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Thank you all for your tips deutschemadchen General Cooking 0 20-12-2008 10:03 PM
Pea Tips! Melba's Jammin' General Cooking 7 22-06-2008 07:37 AM
Some tips ThoughtPoster General Cooking 0 17-07-2007 03:48 PM
PG Tips Fran Tea 0 03-06-2007 10:46 PM
tips [email protected] General Cooking 13 24-02-2007 08:01 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 08:41 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2022, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2022 FoodBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about Food and drink"

 

Copyright © 2017