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  #76 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 20-09-2004, 08:39 PM
Musashi
 
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"Gerry" wrote in message
.. .
In article , werewolf
wrote:

"Does anyone *like* those really long plastic blunt tip chopsticks
they have in Chinese restaurants?"


"Like"? I don't know, I can eat with them just fine. To me it has all
the distinction of trim design on the handle of a fork or spoon.
Doesn't really mean much to me. They all work just fine!

--- At a a very crowded local place in Little Saigon in Westminster,
CA there were two types of chopsticks on the tables - the "sanitary"
bamboo disposable kind and the reusable long plastic Chinese kind
which were loose, unwrapped. I noticed that most of the patrons were
favoring the long plastic chopsticks, and I think - having tried both
- that they are more efficient on the Vietnamese pho noodle soups.


Are you in the Westminster area? I'm in North-west Santa Ana so eat
there frequently. I've always seen plastic chinese chopsticks at the
table with the condiments; I've never once seen disposable chopsticks.
That would be about a 0 in 400 occasion for my Vietnamese dining in
Orange County.

--- Vietnamese like the long chopsticks; Japanese and Koreans the
short chopsticks.


So it seems. The legacy of the cuisines happen to be related as well.

"The cheezy, made-in-China chopsticks that -unfortunately- many
Japanese restaurants have come to rely upon are less than $0.05/pair."


These would be the "cheezy" disposable wooden kind then? I wish they
would dissapper. They have to whittle a lot of lumber, frequently from
Canada I understand to produce these billions of disposable chopsticks.

--- Less than one cent, even at retail (even now, 3 1/2 years after
that message was written!)

--- Those sanitary disposable chopsticks are not very sanitary at all,
often made from dirty bamboo that was used in construction and then
bleached out with corrosive chemicals, and some by slave labor in
Chinese prisons under the most unsanitary conditions. They are
starting to outlaw them in some places in China now because they are
very wasteful of wood.


How do you come by the information they are made of bamboo. They all
seem to be made of what looks like pine...?


There are two basic "kinds" of waribashi used in Japanese restaurants.
The cheaper kind does look like pine (or other wood) and is cut so that
there are 4 sides.
This is the type where sometimes one screws up and they break unevenly
requiring
a stealthy stretch over the the empty table next to you to grab another set.
(see top- white birch waribashi)
The other kind is bamboo. Although square at the top where the two
hashi are joined, the rest of the chopsticks are each circular and are
tapered at the end.
This type is also fairly common especially in the better Japanese
resaurants.
(See second from top)
Some Bamboo chopsticks are not rounded and cut square.
(See last two examples at bottom)

http://www.beeluck.co.jp/HZ.event/KH...n/waribasi.htm




  #77 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 20-09-2004, 08:49 PM
Musashi
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"werewolf" wrote in message
om...
"Musashi" wrote in message

...
"werewolf" wrote in message
om...
"Does anyone *like* those really long plastic blunt tip chopsticks
they have in Chinese restaurants?"


I grew up with the Japanese chopsticks so I find the Chinese ones too

long
for eating. But I have a bigger problem with them not being tapered,

after
all I have
no problem at all using Japanese long chopsticks when cooking.

--- At a a very crowded local place in Little Saigon in Westminster,
CA there were two types of chopsticks on the tables - the "sanitary"
bamboo disposable kind and the reusable long plastic Chinese kind
which were loose, unwrapped. I noticed that most of the patrons were
favoring the long plastic chopsticks, and I think - having tried both
- that they are more efficient on the Vietnamese pho noodle soups.


That's surprising. If I recall correctly, Pho noodles are like Japanese

Udon
but
flater and made from rice. I would have expected the bamboo chopsticks

to be
more popular as plastic ones really have a hard time holding noodles in
broth.





I think the difference is that the pho comes in a very big bowl. The
big plastic chopsticks seem to hold the noodles OK. The trick is to
put your face close to the bowl.


Must be great for clearing out sinuses

I found some nice long Chinese-style chopsticks made from a
multicoloured wood, coconut I think, in the Vietnamese shops in
Westminster, very inexpensive. They're nice, I like them better than
plastic, but the wood is much weaker than bamboo.


Yes, Bamboo seems to be the strongest.
Those fine laquered Japanese "family" chopsticks are bamboo.
Usually the laquer starts chipping well before the chopsticks themselves
show any signs of wear and tear.

snip


I'm not surprised that the Chinese are exporting low cost disposable
chopsticks.
Upto maybe 10 years ago, Japanese Waribashi (disposable chopsticks) were
made
from wood exported from the United States. Somewhere in the middle of

the
country
like Montana or Wyoming. Presume that's history now.


Yeah, Japan imports them from China now, like everybody else. I read
about a Japanese girl who made an experiment as part of her project to
prove that the disposable chopsticks were unhealthy as well as being
destructive to the forests. She placed one into a bowl of fish and the
fish died, presumably because of the chemicals released from the
treated wood.


Oh good grief.


  #78 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 20-09-2004, 09:15 PM
Gerry
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article , Musashi
wrote:

There are two basic "kinds" of waribashi used in Japanese
restaurants. The cheaper kind does look like pine (or other wood) and
is cut so that there are 4 sides. This is the type where sometimes
one screws up and they break unevenly requiring a stealthy stretch
over the the empty table next to you to grab another set. (see top-
white birch waribashi) The other kind is bamboo. Although square at
the top where the two hashi are joined, the rest of the chopsticks
are each circular and are tapered at the end. This type is also
fairly common especially in the better Japanese resaurants.


I'm surprised that the later (the good chopsticks) are bamboo. Seems it
would be more difficult to produce. Are they actually made from bamboo
pulp?

--
"A Dictionary of Japanese Food, Ingredients & Culture" by Richard Hosking
(Tuttle, '97). All the hints one might need for exploring Japanese food.

"The Sake Handbook" by John Gaunter (Tuttle, '02). An excellent intro and
reference to sake.
  #79 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 20-09-2004, 09:51 PM
Musashi
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Gerry" wrote in message
.. .
In article , Musashi
wrote:

There are two basic "kinds" of waribashi used in Japanese
restaurants. The cheaper kind does look like pine (or other wood) and
is cut so that there are 4 sides. This is the type where sometimes
one screws up and they break unevenly requiring a stealthy stretch
over the the empty table next to you to grab another set. (see top-
white birch waribashi) The other kind is bamboo. Although square at
the top where the two hashi are joined, the rest of the chopsticks
are each circular and are tapered at the end. This type is also
fairly common especially in the better Japanese resaurants.


I'm surprised that the later (the good chopsticks) are bamboo. Seems it
would be more difficult to produce. Are they actually made from bamboo
pulp?


Pulp as in....mashed up and reformed bamboo?
I don't think so because every bamboo chopstick I have ever broken
(yes I was not a quiet child) you could see spots, vertical strands.
I dont think you'd see this if it was pulp.


  #80 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 20-09-2004, 09:51 PM
Musashi
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Gerry" wrote in message
.. .
In article , Musashi
wrote:

There are two basic "kinds" of waribashi used in Japanese
restaurants. The cheaper kind does look like pine (or other wood) and
is cut so that there are 4 sides. This is the type where sometimes
one screws up and they break unevenly requiring a stealthy stretch
over the the empty table next to you to grab another set. (see top-
white birch waribashi) The other kind is bamboo. Although square at
the top where the two hashi are joined, the rest of the chopsticks
are each circular and are tapered at the end. This type is also
fairly common especially in the better Japanese resaurants.


I'm surprised that the later (the good chopsticks) are bamboo. Seems it
would be more difficult to produce. Are they actually made from bamboo
pulp?


Pulp as in....mashed up and reformed bamboo?
I don't think so because every bamboo chopstick I have ever broken
(yes I was not a quiet child) you could see spots, vertical strands.
I dont think you'd see this if it was pulp.




  #81 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 21-09-2004, 12:26 AM
Gerry
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article , Musashi
wrote:

I'm surprised that the later (the good chopsticks) are bamboo. Seems it
would be more difficult to produce. Are they actually made from bamboo
pulp?


Pulp as in....mashed up and reformed bamboo?
I don't think so because every bamboo chopstick I have ever broken
(yes I was not a quiet child) you could see spots, vertical strands.
I dont think you'd see this if it was pulp.


Yeah, true enough. Maybe the uncurl the bamboo and stamp it. Who
knows...

--
"A Dictionary of Japanese Food, Ingredients & Culture" by Richard Hosking
(Tuttle, '97). All the hints one might need for exploring Japanese food.

"The Sake Handbook" by John Gaunter (Tuttle, '02). An excellent intro and
reference to sake.
  #82 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 21-09-2004, 12:26 AM
Gerry
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article , Musashi
wrote:

I'm surprised that the later (the good chopsticks) are bamboo. Seems it
would be more difficult to produce. Are they actually made from bamboo
pulp?


Pulp as in....mashed up and reformed bamboo?
I don't think so because every bamboo chopstick I have ever broken
(yes I was not a quiet child) you could see spots, vertical strands.
I dont think you'd see this if it was pulp.


Yeah, true enough. Maybe the uncurl the bamboo and stamp it. Who
knows...

--
"A Dictionary of Japanese Food, Ingredients & Culture" by Richard Hosking
(Tuttle, '97). All the hints one might need for exploring Japanese food.

"The Sake Handbook" by John Gaunter (Tuttle, '02). An excellent intro and
reference to sake.
  #83 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 21-09-2004, 02:06 AM
F t B
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Musashi" wrote in message
m...

"Gerry" wrote in message
.. .
In article , Musashi
wrote:

I'm not surprised that the Chinese are exporting low cost disposable
chopsticks. Upto maybe 10 years ago, Japanese Waribashi (disposable
chopsticks) were made from wood exported from the United States.
Somewhere in the middle of the country like Montana or Wyoming.
Presume that's history now.


The last report on this stuff that I read (maybe 4 years ago) spoke of
Canada as the prime location of exporting chopsticks to Japan. They may
have been exporting the lumber though, rather than the finished item.


I am not surprised at all.


Fort Nelson BC is home to the worlds largest chopstick factory. They pump
out 7.5 million a day or almost 2 billion a year. They use aspen which grows
like a weed up there.


  #84 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 21-09-2004, 02:36 AM
Gerry
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article [email protected], F t B
wrote:

Fort Nelson BC is home to the worlds largest chopstick factory. They pump
out 7.5 million a day or almost 2 billion a year. They use aspen which grows
like a weed up there.


Bingo. Thanks for the data!

--
"A Dictionary of Japanese Food, Ingredients & Culture" by Richard Hosking
(Tuttle, '97). All the hints one might need for exploring Japanese food.

"The Sake Handbook" by John Gaunter (Tuttle, '02). An excellent intro and
reference to sake.
  #85 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 21-09-2004, 03:37 PM
Musashi
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Gerry" wrote in message
.. .
In article , Musashi
wrote:

I'm surprised that the later (the good chopsticks) are bamboo. Seems

it
would be more difficult to produce. Are they actually made from

bamboo
pulp?


Pulp as in....mashed up and reformed bamboo?
I don't think so because every bamboo chopstick I have ever broken
(yes I was not a quiet child) you could see spots, vertical strands.
I dont think you'd see this if it was pulp.


Yeah, true enough. Maybe the uncurl the bamboo and stamp it. Who
knows...


After a discussion with the wife last night, plus a good look at all the
chopsticks we
have in the house, it seems that I did leave out something.
Apparently when I said "all the best chopsticks are bamboo" that was wrong.
Some of the finest chopsticks are made of hardwoods like oak, etc.




  #86 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 21-09-2004, 03:37 PM
Musashi
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Gerry" wrote in message
.. .
In article , Musashi
wrote:

I'm surprised that the later (the good chopsticks) are bamboo. Seems

it
would be more difficult to produce. Are they actually made from

bamboo
pulp?


Pulp as in....mashed up and reformed bamboo?
I don't think so because every bamboo chopstick I have ever broken
(yes I was not a quiet child) you could see spots, vertical strands.
I dont think you'd see this if it was pulp.


Yeah, true enough. Maybe the uncurl the bamboo and stamp it. Who
knows...


After a discussion with the wife last night, plus a good look at all the
chopsticks we
have in the house, it seems that I did leave out something.
Apparently when I said "all the best chopsticks are bamboo" that was wrong.
Some of the finest chopsticks are made of hardwoods like oak, etc.


  #87 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 21-09-2004, 03:52 PM
Dan Logcher
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Musashi wrote:

"Gerry" wrote in message
.. .

In article , Musashi
wrote:


I'm surprised that the later (the good chopsticks) are bamboo. Seems

it

would be more difficult to produce. Are they actually made from

bamboo

pulp?

Pulp as in....mashed up and reformed bamboo?
I don't think so because every bamboo chopstick I have ever broken
(yes I was not a quiet child) you could see spots, vertical strands.
I dont think you'd see this if it was pulp.

Yeah, true enough. Maybe the uncurl the bamboo and stamp it. Who
knows...



After a discussion with the wife last night, plus a good look at all the
chopsticks we
have in the house, it seems that I did leave out something.
Apparently when I said "all the best chopsticks are bamboo" that was wrong.
Some of the finest chopsticks are made of hardwoods like oak, etc.


I have 6 sets that are made with ironwood from Thailand, and two pair of
jade chopsticks from China. I've never used the jade sets, since I was told
they are too brittle and would shatter if dropped. I have 4 pair of lamenated
rough tip chopsticks, and the rest are a mixture of the plastic Chinese and the
bamboo Chinese chopsticks.

My parents have two sets of ivory chopsticks that were a gift from some
Japanese students.

--
Dan

  #88 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 21-09-2004, 03:52 PM
Dan Logcher
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Musashi wrote:

"Gerry" wrote in message
.. .

In article , Musashi
wrote:


I'm surprised that the later (the good chopsticks) are bamboo. Seems

it

would be more difficult to produce. Are they actually made from

bamboo

pulp?

Pulp as in....mashed up and reformed bamboo?
I don't think so because every bamboo chopstick I have ever broken
(yes I was not a quiet child) you could see spots, vertical strands.
I dont think you'd see this if it was pulp.

Yeah, true enough. Maybe the uncurl the bamboo and stamp it. Who
knows...



After a discussion with the wife last night, plus a good look at all the
chopsticks we
have in the house, it seems that I did leave out something.
Apparently when I said "all the best chopsticks are bamboo" that was wrong.
Some of the finest chopsticks are made of hardwoods like oak, etc.


I have 6 sets that are made with ironwood from Thailand, and two pair of
jade chopsticks from China. I've never used the jade sets, since I was told
they are too brittle and would shatter if dropped. I have 4 pair of lamenated
rough tip chopsticks, and the rest are a mixture of the plastic Chinese and the
bamboo Chinese chopsticks.

My parents have two sets of ivory chopsticks that were a gift from some
Japanese students.

--
Dan

  #89 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 21-09-2004, 04:00 PM
Musashi
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Dan Logcher" wrote in message
...
Musashi wrote:

"Gerry" wrote in message
.. .

In article , Musashi
wrote:


I'm surprised that the later (the good chopsticks) are bamboo. Seems

it

would be more difficult to produce. Are they actually made from

bamboo

pulp?

Pulp as in....mashed up and reformed bamboo?
I don't think so because every bamboo chopstick I have ever broken
(yes I was not a quiet child) you could see spots, vertical strands.
I dont think you'd see this if it was pulp.

Yeah, true enough. Maybe the uncurl the bamboo and stamp it. Who
knows...



After a discussion with the wife last night, plus a good look at all the
chopsticks we
have in the house, it seems that I did leave out something.
Apparently when I said "all the best chopsticks are bamboo" that was

wrong.
Some of the finest chopsticks are made of hardwoods like oak, etc.


I have 6 sets that are made with ironwood from Thailand, and two pair of
jade chopsticks from China. I've never used the jade sets, since I was

told
they are too brittle and would shatter if dropped. I have 4 pair of

lamenated
rough tip chopsticks, and the rest are a mixture of the plastic Chinese

and the
bamboo Chinese chopsticks.


I presume the Jade set is an decorative set, not for use.

My parents have two sets of ivory chopsticks that were a gift from some
Japanese students.


They did a good job getting it past US Customs.





  #90 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 21-09-2004, 04:00 PM
Musashi
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Dan Logcher" wrote in message
...
Musashi wrote:

"Gerry" wrote in message
.. .

In article , Musashi
wrote:


I'm surprised that the later (the good chopsticks) are bamboo. Seems

it

would be more difficult to produce. Are they actually made from

bamboo

pulp?

Pulp as in....mashed up and reformed bamboo?
I don't think so because every bamboo chopstick I have ever broken
(yes I was not a quiet child) you could see spots, vertical strands.
I dont think you'd see this if it was pulp.

Yeah, true enough. Maybe the uncurl the bamboo and stamp it. Who
knows...



After a discussion with the wife last night, plus a good look at all the
chopsticks we
have in the house, it seems that I did leave out something.
Apparently when I said "all the best chopsticks are bamboo" that was

wrong.
Some of the finest chopsticks are made of hardwoods like oak, etc.


I have 6 sets that are made with ironwood from Thailand, and two pair of
jade chopsticks from China. I've never used the jade sets, since I was

told
they are too brittle and would shatter if dropped. I have 4 pair of

lamenated
rough tip chopsticks, and the rest are a mixture of the plastic Chinese

and the
bamboo Chinese chopsticks.


I presume the Jade set is an decorative set, not for use.

My parents have two sets of ivory chopsticks that were a gift from some
Japanese students.


They did a good job getting it past US Customs.





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