Sushi (alt.food.sushi) For talking sushi. (Sashimi, wasabi, miso soup, and other elements of the sushi experience are valid topics.) Sushi is a broad topic; discussions range from preparation to methods of eating to favorite kinds to good restaurants.

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  #16 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 05-09-2004, 02:10 AM
Nomen Nescio
 
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None of the chopsticks on the site, especially the
Japanese ones, had the rough area near the tip.
My brother-in-law bought us two sets of Japanese
chopsticks during a trip that have this, and it makes
picking up the slippery stuff a lot easier.


Personally, I don't care, but is that traditional? If
they'd put a little hinge in the middle, along with the
serrations, you could use them like forceps and not miss
anything. Or why not just use a fork?

BTW, does "ohashi" refer to ALL chopsticks or just certain
kinds (breakapart; fancy polished chopsticks; other)?

I use chopsticks when eating out and get by with the
different kinds: breakapart disposables, plastic/fake
ivory square kind, etc. I have the biggest problems
with the pointy polished kind but can usually everything,
even all the rice.

Basically, I use what they give me. If the restaurant
set my place with Western utensils and no chopsticks I
don't make a fuss and eat that way. Although, I've never
ordered sushi and NOT gotten chopsticks. Since reading
about it in a.f.s as being acceptable, even in Japan, I
will sometimes use my fingers for maki and nigiri but not
chirashi or sashimi. I have little whorls, loops and arches
on my fingertips that make it easier to hold slippery things.







--
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  #17 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 05-09-2004, 02:10 AM
Nomen Nescio
 
Posts: n/a
Default

None of the chopsticks on the site, especially the
Japanese ones, had the rough area near the tip.
My brother-in-law bought us two sets of Japanese
chopsticks during a trip that have this, and it makes
picking up the slippery stuff a lot easier.


Personally, I don't care, but is that traditional? If
they'd put a little hinge in the middle, along with the
serrations, you could use them like forceps and not miss
anything. Or why not just use a fork?

BTW, does "ohashi" refer to ALL chopsticks or just certain
kinds (breakapart; fancy polished chopsticks; other)?

I use chopsticks when eating out and get by with the
different kinds: breakapart disposables, plastic/fake
ivory square kind, etc. I have the biggest problems
with the pointy polished kind but can usually everything,
even all the rice.

Basically, I use what they give me. If the restaurant
set my place with Western utensils and no chopsticks I
don't make a fuss and eat that way. Although, I've never
ordered sushi and NOT gotten chopsticks. Since reading
about it in a.f.s as being acceptable, even in Japan, I
will sometimes use my fingers for maki and nigiri but not
chirashi or sashimi. I have little whorls, loops and arches
on my fingertips that make it easier to hold slippery things.







--
Sent by xanadoog from yahoo piece from com
This is a spam protected message. Please answer with reference header.
Posted via http://www.usenet-replayer.com
  #18 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 05-09-2004, 03:22 AM
Dan Logcher
 
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Nomen Nescio wrote:
None of the chopsticks on the site, especially the
Japanese ones, had the rough area near the tip.
My brother-in-law bought us two sets of Japanese
chopsticks during a trip that have this, and it makes
picking up the slippery stuff a lot easier.



Personally, I don't care, but is that traditional? If
they'd put a little hinge in the middle, along with the
serrations, you could use them like forceps and not miss
anything. Or why not just use a fork?


Or why not use a shovel.

Basically, I use what they give me. If the restaurant
set my place with Western utensils and no chopsticks I
don't make a fuss and eat that way. Although, I've never
ordered sushi and NOT gotten chopsticks. Since reading
about it in a.f.s as being acceptable, even in Japan, I
will sometimes use my fingers for maki and nigiri but not
chirashi or sashimi. I have little whorls, loops and arches
on my fingertips that make it easier to hold slippery things.


Sashimi should never be eaten with your fingers, and that's
where chopsicks are more useful.

--
Dan

  #19 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 05-09-2004, 03:22 AM
Dan Logcher
 
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Default

Nomen Nescio wrote:
None of the chopsticks on the site, especially the
Japanese ones, had the rough area near the tip.
My brother-in-law bought us two sets of Japanese
chopsticks during a trip that have this, and it makes
picking up the slippery stuff a lot easier.



Personally, I don't care, but is that traditional? If
they'd put a little hinge in the middle, along with the
serrations, you could use them like forceps and not miss
anything. Or why not just use a fork?


Or why not use a shovel.

Basically, I use what they give me. If the restaurant
set my place with Western utensils and no chopsticks I
don't make a fuss and eat that way. Although, I've never
ordered sushi and NOT gotten chopsticks. Since reading
about it in a.f.s as being acceptable, even in Japan, I
will sometimes use my fingers for maki and nigiri but not
chirashi or sashimi. I have little whorls, loops and arches
on my fingertips that make it easier to hold slippery things.


Sashimi should never be eaten with your fingers, and that's
where chopsicks are more useful.

--
Dan

  #20 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 05-09-2004, 04:01 AM
Mekare
 
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On 4-Sep-2004, (Nomen Nescio)
wrote:

I have little whorls, loops and arches
on my fingertips that make it easier to hold slippery things.


Ha ha! Goof!



  #22 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 05-09-2004, 04:03 AM
Christopher Browne
 
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Oops! "D. Lutjen" was seen spray-painting on a wall:
"Dan Logcher" wrote in message
...
Mekare wrote:


They are veyr nice looking though.. but I have several sets of Thai
chopsticks made of different blends of laminated hardwood.


I bought my daily use chopsticks in Tokyo in 1987; ¥5,000 and well
worth every ¥en. Just beginning to show some wear on the tips. It
pays not to scrimp when it comes to chopsticks. I have a "his and
her" set I bought back in 1980 - never used. Made out of small
branches with a gorgeous finish . . . on the large end, you can see
the growth rings of the twig. Beautiful workmanship. I never use
these.


A $45 set of chopsticks sounds a tad high, but not too wildly so;
that's not outrageous for silverware...

Are there web-based sources for this sort of thing?

I'd certainly be _way_ more interested in something meant to be used
as opposed to something intended only for display purposes.
--
(reverse (concatenate 'string "gro.gultn" "@" "enworbbc"))
http://cbbrowne.com/info/postgresql.html
All syllogisms have three parts, therefore this is not a syllogism.
  #23 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 05-09-2004, 04:03 AM
Christopher Browne
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Oops! "D. Lutjen" was seen spray-painting on a wall:
"Dan Logcher" wrote in message
...
Mekare wrote:


They are veyr nice looking though.. but I have several sets of Thai
chopsticks made of different blends of laminated hardwood.


I bought my daily use chopsticks in Tokyo in 1987; ¥5,000 and well
worth every ¥en. Just beginning to show some wear on the tips. It
pays not to scrimp when it comes to chopsticks. I have a "his and
her" set I bought back in 1980 - never used. Made out of small
branches with a gorgeous finish . . . on the large end, you can see
the growth rings of the twig. Beautiful workmanship. I never use
these.


A $45 set of chopsticks sounds a tad high, but not too wildly so;
that's not outrageous for silverware...

Are there web-based sources for this sort of thing?

I'd certainly be _way_ more interested in something meant to be used
as opposed to something intended only for display purposes.
--
(reverse (concatenate 'string "gro.gultn" "@" "enworbbc"))
http://cbbrowne.com/info/postgresql.html
All syllogisms have three parts, therefore this is not a syllogism.
  #24 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 05-09-2004, 04:03 AM
Christopher Browne
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Oops! "D. Lutjen" was seen spray-painting on a wall:
"Dan Logcher" wrote in message
...
Mekare wrote:


They are veyr nice looking though.. but I have several sets of Thai
chopsticks made of different blends of laminated hardwood.


I bought my daily use chopsticks in Tokyo in 1987; ¥5,000 and well
worth every ¥en. Just beginning to show some wear on the tips. It
pays not to scrimp when it comes to chopsticks. I have a "his and
her" set I bought back in 1980 - never used. Made out of small
branches with a gorgeous finish . . . on the large end, you can see
the growth rings of the twig. Beautiful workmanship. I never use
these.


A $45 set of chopsticks sounds a tad high, but not too wildly so;
that's not outrageous for silverware...

Are there web-based sources for this sort of thing?

I'd certainly be _way_ more interested in something meant to be used
as opposed to something intended only for display purposes.
--
(reverse (concatenate 'string "gro.gultn" "@" "enworbbc"))
http://cbbrowne.com/info/postgresql.html
All syllogisms have three parts, therefore this is not a syllogism.
  #25 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 05-09-2004, 05:50 AM
Gerry
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article , Christopher Browne
wrote:

A $45 set of chopsticks sounds a tad high, but not too wildly so;
that's not outrageous for silverware...


I just bought some high-dollar flatware, which I must admit is a
delight to use. $39 bucks a setting. So $45 dollars for two sticks
seems a bit hight compared to 5 pieces of high quality stainless steel.

--
"A Dictionary of Japanese Food, Ingredients & Culture" by Richard Hosking
(Tuttle, '97). All the hints one might need for exploring Japanese food.

"The Sake Handbook" by John Gaunter (Tuttle, '02). An excellent intro and
reference to sake.


  #26 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 05-09-2004, 05:50 AM
Gerry
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article , Christopher Browne
wrote:

A $45 set of chopsticks sounds a tad high, but not too wildly so;
that's not outrageous for silverware...


I just bought some high-dollar flatware, which I must admit is a
delight to use. $39 bucks a setting. So $45 dollars for two sticks
seems a bit hight compared to 5 pieces of high quality stainless steel.

--
"A Dictionary of Japanese Food, Ingredients & Culture" by Richard Hosking
(Tuttle, '97). All the hints one might need for exploring Japanese food.

"The Sake Handbook" by John Gaunter (Tuttle, '02). An excellent intro and
reference to sake.
  #27 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 06-09-2004, 04:40 AM
Nomen Nescio
 
Posts: n/a
Default

One of those amazing surprises: We bumped into a chopstick
store in the neightborhood of Kobe named Motomachi where
we probably spent 45 minues. Hundreds of pairs of chopsticks
on the wall, each beautiful, different, curious, fascinating.


What are the different names for different kinds of chopsticks?
I know "hashi" or "ohashi" but I don't know which kind that term
refers to or if it's generic for any (all) chopsticks.

Cheap, infinished break apart disposable wooden chopsticks,
kind of squarish
Inexpensive wooden, usually unfinished, reusable: square handles,
round, non-tapered ends
Inexpensive plastic (like fake ivory): square handles, round
non-tapered ends
Fancy plastic with tapered, almost pointy ends
Fancy wooden lacquered with tapered, almost pointy ends
Serrated, non-serrated
Etc.

("Western" tableware has forks, salad forks, shrimp forks, serving
forks, olive forks, ramekin forks, potato forks, cocktail forks, ...)

Would you ask for "ohashi" in a fancy restaurant or is that strictly the
cheap kind w/ take out?

Would it be polite to ask for "serrated chopsticks" (by whatever the
correct term is) in a restaurant? If enough people ask, maybe they'll
get some.

Or why not use a shovel.


A shovel would make quick work of the meal but for AYCE or
sushi eating contests (cf., pie eating contests) I think service in a
trough would be faster and more efficient. There might be some
disagreement whether nigiri sushi served in a trough is still sushi
if it quickly becomes chirashi, but I'll leave that to the experts.

Some Japanese guy keeps winning the Nathan's July 4 Hot Dog
Eating Contest at Coney Island (New York City). Is there a sushi
eating contest in Japan that accepts gaijin competitors? With
chopsticks or w/o?






--
Sent by xanadoog from yahoo piece from com
This is a spam protected message. Please answer with reference header.
Posted via http://www.usenet-replayer.com
  #28 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 06-09-2004, 04:40 AM
Nomen Nescio
 
Posts: n/a
Default

One of those amazing surprises: We bumped into a chopstick
store in the neightborhood of Kobe named Motomachi where
we probably spent 45 minues. Hundreds of pairs of chopsticks
on the wall, each beautiful, different, curious, fascinating.


What are the different names for different kinds of chopsticks?
I know "hashi" or "ohashi" but I don't know which kind that term
refers to or if it's generic for any (all) chopsticks.

Cheap, infinished break apart disposable wooden chopsticks,
kind of squarish
Inexpensive wooden, usually unfinished, reusable: square handles,
round, non-tapered ends
Inexpensive plastic (like fake ivory): square handles, round
non-tapered ends
Fancy plastic with tapered, almost pointy ends
Fancy wooden lacquered with tapered, almost pointy ends
Serrated, non-serrated
Etc.

("Western" tableware has forks, salad forks, shrimp forks, serving
forks, olive forks, ramekin forks, potato forks, cocktail forks, ...)

Would you ask for "ohashi" in a fancy restaurant or is that strictly the
cheap kind w/ take out?

Would it be polite to ask for "serrated chopsticks" (by whatever the
correct term is) in a restaurant? If enough people ask, maybe they'll
get some.

Or why not use a shovel.


A shovel would make quick work of the meal but for AYCE or
sushi eating contests (cf., pie eating contests) I think service in a
trough would be faster and more efficient. There might be some
disagreement whether nigiri sushi served in a trough is still sushi
if it quickly becomes chirashi, but I'll leave that to the experts.

Some Japanese guy keeps winning the Nathan's July 4 Hot Dog
Eating Contest at Coney Island (New York City). Is there a sushi
eating contest in Japan that accepts gaijin competitors? With
chopsticks or w/o?






--
Sent by xanadoog from yahoo piece from com
This is a spam protected message. Please answer with reference header.
Posted via http://www.usenet-replayer.com
  #29 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 06-09-2004, 05:12 PM
Gerry
 
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Default

In article , Nomen
Nescio wrote:

One of those amazing surprises: We bumped into a chopstick store in
the neightborhood of Kobe named Motomachi where we probably spent
45 minues. Hundreds of pairs of chopsticks on the wall, each
beautiful, different, curious, fascinating.


What are the different names for different kinds of chopsticks? I
know "hashi" or "ohashi" but I don't know which kind that term refers
to or if it's generic for any (all) chopsticks.


I don't think there are other names. Hashi means chopsticks. o-hashi
is the honorific version of same. I think that's about it. If you got
cheap and disposable chopsticks, you might qualify it with "better" or
"fancy" or "not junk" or something.

--
"A Dictionary of Japanese Food, Ingredients & Culture" by Richard Hosking
(Tuttle, '97). All the hints one might need for exploring Japanese food.

"The Sake Handbook" by John Gaunter (Tuttle, '02). An excellent intro and
reference to sake.


  #30 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 06-09-2004, 05:12 PM
Gerry
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article , Nomen
Nescio wrote:

One of those amazing surprises: We bumped into a chopstick store in
the neightborhood of Kobe named Motomachi where we probably spent
45 minues. Hundreds of pairs of chopsticks on the wall, each
beautiful, different, curious, fascinating.


What are the different names for different kinds of chopsticks? I
know "hashi" or "ohashi" but I don't know which kind that term refers
to or if it's generic for any (all) chopsticks.


I don't think there are other names. Hashi means chopsticks. o-hashi
is the honorific version of same. I think that's about it. If you got
cheap and disposable chopsticks, you might qualify it with "better" or
"fancy" or "not junk" or something.

--
"A Dictionary of Japanese Food, Ingredients & Culture" by Richard Hosking
(Tuttle, '97). All the hints one might need for exploring Japanese food.

"The Sake Handbook" by John Gaunter (Tuttle, '02). An excellent intro and
reference to sake.


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