Mexican Cooking (alt.food.mexican-cooking) A newsgroup created for the discussion and sharing of mexican food and recipes.

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  #1 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 30-09-2003, 03:42 AM
maiggy
 
Posts: n/a
Default Chile verde question

Chile Verde aka salsa verde is a Mexican recipe, but *******ized by the
latest southwest craze.
If you want a recipe, let me know and I'll give you mine as I am Mexican and
make all my own salsas, hot sauces, "chutneys", etc.
Molcajete Mama
"Karen O'Mara" wrote in message
om...
"TKA" wrote in message

...
Is chile verde a mexican recipe or a southwestern one? Does anybody have

a
good recipe to share? The hotter the better!


Try googling on this one... there's been lots of recipes posted on
chile verde here over the years.

I think chile verde is Mexican more than southwestern.

Karen




  #2 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 30-09-2003, 04:14 AM
maiggy
 
Posts: n/a
Default Chile verde question

I'm Mexican American and I can safely tell you that I have been complimented
by many Mexican nationals on my cooking and ask if I was born in Mexico.
Our dishes are not mild, the last 2-3 generations of Mexican Americans have
become wimps with *******ized and desensitized palates when it comes to
cooking. Most don't even cook at home other that quick, dirty and in a
hurry dishes (my husband's a jarhead). Chile verde is really salsa verde
and it is supposed to be hot and some of the recipes that I've seen on this
newsgroup are something I would never try and my husband is ditto on this
one and he's German American but eats enough spicy dishes and hot sauces to
qualify as being a Mexican. Hell, he say's he's more Mexican than I am! If
you want a true Mexican (not southwest) recipe then let me know and I will
send you my 3 variations of salsa verde. Kudos Jarhead!
"Jack Schidt®" wrote in message
news

"Jarhead" wrote in message
...

"Wayne Lundberg" wrote in message
...
| It's southwestern US because rarely do you find Mexican Mexican food

that
is
| designed to be really picante. Great care is taken to warn the diners

that
| the chile rellenos are this or that, or that the mole is this or that.
| Mostly Mexican Mexican cooking is mild and the salsas are added by the
| eaters from the dishes on the table of salsa verde, salsa borracha,

pico
de
| gallo, chipotle, etc.
|
| Wayne
|
| "TKA" wrote in message
| ...
| Is chile verde a mexican recipe or a southwestern one? Does anybody

have
a
| good recipe to share? The hotter the better!
|
|
|
|

Tell that to the Guadalajara Restaurant in Clovis, N.M. Papa Casillas
presented his Chili Verde as an authentic dish from his native land and
passed it on to his grandson. He also placed a potent salsa verde on

your
table unless you wanted a milder version. I dined there often when I

worked
for the AT&SF railroad 25 years ago, and when I asked about the

authenticity
of his recipe, was kindly set straight by Papa himself.

Jarhead



I think all rules and all traditions have variations. I like the sound of
the place you described.

Jack




  #3 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 30-09-2003, 04:16 AM
maiggy
 
Posts: n/a
Default Chile verde question

The recipe below is not for chile verde or salsa verde but rather for
"Chuletas de Puerco con Chile Verde" or "Pork Tips with Chile Verde".
Molcajete Mama
"The Ranger" wrote in message
...
Linda clarified in message
news[email protected] after Barfieldsr


asked in message .. .
I think chile verde is Mexican more than southwestern.

What difference does it make, as long as it taste good?

There's a *big* difference between Mexican and Southwestern...


Look at the poster your trying to reason with, Linda...

ObRecipe: ERNESTO'S MEXICAN FOOD CHILE VERDE
Source: Ernesto's Mexican Food, Sacramento, California

INGREDIENTS:
2 pounds lean pork roast (cut into 1/2-inch cubes)
10 green tomatillos
2 tablespoons diced jalapenos
1 small onion, chopped
1/2 bunch cilantro, chopped
1 tablespoon chopped garlic
Salt and pepper to taste
3 tablespoons canola oil

METHOD:
Place most of the ingredients in blender (except pork) and puree.
In a small pot, brown cubed pork with three tablespoons of canola

oil.
Make sure to brown all sides evenly. This should take about ten minutes.
Remove all excess oil from meat. Stir in pureed ingredients and let
simmer for 20 to 25 minutes. Cooking time depends on size of cube and how
much the meat cooked while browning.
Taste for flavor; for more spiciness, add jalapenos.


The Ranger




  #4 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 30-09-2003, 04:59 AM
Jack B
 
Posts: n/a
Default Chile verde question

In article , maiggy
wrote:

I'm Mexican American and I can safely tell you that I have been complimented
by many Mexican nationals on my cooking and ask if I was born in Mexico.
Our dishes are not mild, the last 2-3 generations of Mexican Americans have
become wimps with *******ized and desensitized palates when it comes to
cooking. Most don't even cook at home other that quick, dirty and in a
hurry dishes (my husband's a jarhead). Chile verde is really salsa verde
and it is supposed to be hot and some of the recipes that I've seen on this
newsgroup are something I would never try and my husband is ditto on this
one and he's German American but eats enough spicy dishes and hot sauces to
qualify as being a Mexican. Hell, he say's he's more Mexican than I am! If
you want a true Mexican (not southwest) recipe then let me know and I will
send you my 3 variations of salsa verde. Kudos Jarhead!


Yeah, post some recipes, please...

I'd love to see your and the jarhead's favorites.

And tell us a little about what parts of Mexico your ideas come from...

--
Jack
  #5 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 30-09-2003, 04:18 PM
The Ranger
 
Posts: n/a
Default Chile verde question

Top-postin' maiggy [aka Top-poster Molcajete Mama]
corrected previous messages in
. ..
I think chile verde is Mexican more than southwestern.

What difference does it make, as long as it taste good?

There's a *big* difference between Mexican and Southwestern...

Look at the poster your trying to reason with, Linda...

ObRecipe: ERNESTO'S MEXICAN FOOD CHILE VERDE
Source: Ernesto's Mexican Food, Sacramento, California

INGREDIENTS:
2 pounds lean pork roast (cut into 1/2-inch cubes)
10 green tomatillos
2 tablespoons diced jalapenos
1 small onion, chopped
1/2 bunch cilantro, chopped
1 tablespoon chopped garlic
Salt and pepper to taste
3 tablespoons canola oil

METHOD:
Place most of the ingredients in blender (except pork) and puree.
In a small pot, brown cubed pork with three tablespoons of canola
oil. Make sure to brown all sides evenly. This should take about
ten minutes. Remove all excess oil from meat. Stir in pureed
ingredients and let simmer for 20 to 25 minutes. Cooking time
depends on size of cube and how much the meat cooked while
browning. Taste for flavor; for more spiciness, add jalapenos.

The recipe [now correctly placed above] is not for chile verde or
salsa verde but rather for "Chuletas de Puerco con Chile Verde"
or "Pork Tips with Chile Verde".


Hmmm. The El Salvadoran, Oaxacan and Vera Cruz owers of restaurants I know
hold differing opinions than you. Their recipes are slightly different (some
being more soupy than others; all delicious) from each other as well as the
example above but they all list it as "Chile Verde" on their menus.

Can you provide a definitive source to back up your claim? Which part of
Mexico are you from? Do you count regional variations at authentico or hold
them in disdain as pail imitations?

The Ranger




  #6 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 30-09-2003, 09:54 PM
A1 WBarfieldsr
 
Posts: n/a
Default Chile verde question


"maiggy" wrote in message =
. ..
The recipe below is not for chile verde or salsa verde but rather for
"Chuletas de Puerco con Chile Verde" or "Pork Tips with Chile Verde".
Molcajete Mama
"The Ranger" wrote in message
...
Linda clarified in message
news[email protected] after Barfieldsr


asked in message .. .
I think chile verde is Mexican more than southwestern.

What difference does it make, as long as it taste good?

There's a *big* difference between Mexican and Southwestern...


Look at the poster your trying to reason with, Linda...


I wasn't implying there wasn't a difference in Mexican vs. Southwestern. =
I was saying if it taste good, what difference does it make whether it's =
Authentic Mexican or Southwestern, except to fulfill your curiosity. If =
a person had just enjoyed half a burrito from Taco Bell and was informed =
it was not Authentic Mexican food, would they then immediatly spit it =
out and start gagging just because it wasn't Authentic Mexican, or =
finish enjoying the burrito no matter what country it was thought up in.

  #7 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 30-09-2003, 10:25 PM
Misschef
 
Posts: n/a
Default Chile verde question




"A1 WBarfieldsr" wrote in message
...

What difference does it make, as long as it taste good?

There's a *big* difference between Mexican and Southwestern...


Look at the poster your trying to reason with, Linda...


I wasn't implying there wasn't a difference in Mexican vs. Southwestern. I
was saying if it taste good, what difference does it make whether it's
Authentic Mexican or Southwestern, except to fulfill your curiosity. If a
person had just enjoyed half a burrito from Taco Bell and was informed it
was not Authentic Mexican food, would they then immediatly spit it out and
start gagging just because it wasn't Authentic Mexican, or finish enjoying
the burrito no matter what country it was thought up in.

Maybe the difference is that this newsgroup is titled
"mexican-cooking"..............Did I actually read the words "Taco Bell"? I
know several people who swear they can't go a week without eating there and
if they, or anyone else enjoys it, that's great. In my opinion, it has no
place here. We are discussing and sharing Mexican recipes and
cooking........aren't we??? There are lots of food newsgroups that discuss
food in a more general sense. I check the posts here to find "authentic"
Mexican recipes and the history of the foods of Mexico and the people who
prepare/consume it. By reading appropriately directed dialogues I hope to
enrich my knowledge of the same. Otherwise, I would be wasting my time. (and
sometimes I am).


  #8 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 01-10-2003, 01:08 AM
A1 WBarfieldsr
 
Posts: n/a
Default Chile verde question

"Misschef" wrote in message =
hlink.net...
=20
=20
=20
"A1 WBarfieldsr" wrote in message
...
=20
=20

I wasn't implying there wasn't a difference in Mexican vs. =

Southwestern. I
was saying if it taste good, what difference does it make whether it's
Authentic Mexican or Southwestern, except to fulfill your curiosity. =

If a
person had just enjoyed half a burrito from Taco Bell and was informed =

it
was not Authentic Mexican food, would they then immediatly spit it out =

and
start gagging just because it wasn't Authentic Mexican, or finish =

enjoying
the burrito no matter what country it was thought up in.
=20
Maybe the difference is that this newsgroup is titled
"mexican-cooking"..............Did I actually read the words "Taco =

Bell"? I
know several people who swear they can't go a week without eating =

there and
if they, or anyone else enjoys it, that's great. In my opinion, it has =

no
place here. We are discussing and sharing Mexican recipes and
cooking........aren't we??? There are lots of food newsgroups that =

discuss
food in a more general sense. I check the posts here to find =

"authentic"
Mexican recipes and the history of the foods of Mexico and the people =

who
prepare/consume it. By reading appropriately directed dialogues I hope =

to
enrich my knowledge of the same. Otherwise, I would be wasting my =

time. (and
sometimes I am).
=20
Since this is the ONLY newsgroup that has anything to do with the =

Mexican STYLE of cooking, I suppose there might be some room for food =
that had their origins in Mexico. Since there is no "Authentic" Mexican =
cooking, unless you go back to the first Indians in the jungle. I look =
at this newsgroup as foods that originated in Mexico. Every country that =
conquered the people gave and took parts of each others cultural foods =
to make what is the TRADITIONAL style of cooking known today as Mexican =
cooking. When they cooked the first beef "Authentic" went out the window =
and the food has been changing slowly ever since. You don't have to live =
in Mexico to be one of those that prepare/consume the food. As far as =
the history of Mexican foods, Wayne seems to have a lot of knowledge on =
that subject. Gaining any knowledge is never a waste of time, but you =
would probably gain more knowledge by attending classes on the subject =
than reading newsgroups.
--=20
William Barfieldsr

  #9 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 01-10-2003, 02:31 AM
Douglas S. Ladden
 
Posts: n/a
Default Chile verde question

The Terran carbon-based unit designating itself as "A1 WBarfieldsr"
shared its ideas in alt.food.mexican-cooking on
Wed, 01 Oct 2003 00:08:28 GMT:

Since this is the ONLY newsgroup that has anything to do with the

Mexican STYLE of cooking, I suppose there might be some room for food
that had their origins in Mexico. Since there is no "Authentic"
Mexican cooking, unless you go back to the first Indians in the
jungle.


I think you are terribly mistaken here. Since "Mexico" didn't
exist until the Spaniards arrived and named it so, I think Authentic
Mexican food encompasses the food that has developed in the various
regions of the country now known as Mexico. It can certainly include
food that was used in pre-Columbian times, but it isn't limited to that.
We aren't talking Aztec food, nor Mayan food, nor Toltec food, we are
talking Mexican food. And yet, we aren't terribly interested in
modifications or recipes from outside the region of Mexico.

I look at this newsgroup as foods that originated in Mexico.


Right, and that is what it should be. Recipes and foods that
originated in Mexico.

Every country that conquered the people gave and took parts of each
others cultural foods to make what is the TRADITIONAL style of
cooking known today as Mexican cooking.


There is no doubt to this. However, how the people of Mexico
adapted the new foods and techniques to their cooking, is still Mexican
cooking.

When they cooked the first
beef "Authentic" went out the window and the food has been changing
slowly ever since.


I disagree. Though I guess it depends on how you define
"Authentic". I'll use Merriam-Webster's definition 2(c), since it the
most relevant: "c : made or done the same way as an original authentic
Mexican fare". Thus, if someone introduced beef, or Emu, for that
matter into Mexico, and they figured out some way to prepare it in
Mexico, that would still be authentic mexican cooking.

You don't have to live in Mexico to be one of
those that prepare/consume the food.


This is for sure.

As far as the history of Mexican
foods, Wayne seems to have a lot of knowledge on that subject.
Gaining any knowledge is never a waste of time, but you would
probably gain more knowledge by attending classes on the subject than
reading newsgroups.


Agreed that gaining knowledge is a good thing. However, if this
NG has a desire to discuss authentic mexican cooking and recipes, I
think we all should respect that. Cal-Mex, Tex-Mex, and Taco Bell
really do not qualify as authentic Mexican cooking, even though their
recipes may have at some point been modified from an authentic Mexican
recipe. It would be like saying that the Teriyaki Burger at Red Robin
is authentic Japanese food, because it uses Teriyaki sauce, originally
from Japan.

--Douglas
  #10 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 01-10-2003, 04:36 PM
A1 WBarfieldsr
 
Posts: n/a
Default Chile verde question



--
William Barfieldsr
"Douglas S. Ladden" wrote in message
7...
The Terran carbon-based unit designating itself as "A1 WBarfieldsr"
shared its ideas in alt.food.mexican-cooking on
Wed, 01 Oct 2003 00:08:28 GMT:

Since this is the ONLY newsgroup that has anything to do with the

Mexican STYLE of cooking, I suppose there might be some room for food
that had their origins in Mexico. Since there is no "Authentic"
Mexican cooking, unless you go back to the first Indians in the
jungle.


Agreed that gaining knowledge is a good thing. However, if this
NG has a desire to discuss authentic mexican cooking and recipes, I
think we all should respect that. Cal-Mex, Tex-Mex, and Taco Bell
really do not qualify as authentic Mexican cooking, even though their
recipes may have at some point been modified from an authentic Mexican
recipe. It would be like saying that the Teriyaki Burger at Red Robin
is authentic Japanese food, because it uses Teriyaki sauce, originally
from Japan.

--Douglas



At least we agree to disagree. From now on I will at least state that the
recipe may not be "Authentic". That way someone can enjoy the Mexican
flavor with the full knowledge that they are using a recipe that may not be
from Mexico.



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